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Oh please

Kamuela, HI

#1 Mar 31, 2008
"like perhaps restoring all the fish ponds that can feed all the islands and employ all the displaced workers."

If workers wanted to spend their days toiling in fishponds to make you feel good about utopian fantasies they would already be doing it. Life's a little more complex than that these days, and it ain't all Cook's fault either. Get real.
bumpercrop

United States

#2 Mar 31, 2008
Which is easier... Toiling in a fish pond or taking welfare handouts... Hummmmm. Cut off all the handouts and just maybe some of them would work in the fish ponds. Hunger is a great motivator!
Mike Hu

Portland, OR

#3 Mar 31, 2008
The major reason for the popularity of bicycling is as "pedestrians on wheels" -- which are the multitudes of aging baby boomers who can be aided for many years of useful mobility by "activity wheel chairs'-- that bicycling technology lends itself to be -- rather than the delusions of the relatively few out in their bike geek outfits and high performance road bikes trying to prove they are as fast and virile as cars.

For increasingly many, even walking becomes an increasingly prohibitive activity as their feet, knees, hips and backs break down -- whereas biking for several centuries now, has been the most efficient means of human transport since at least da Vinci's concept of the bike to even propel human flight, which was also the inspiration for the famous bicycle mechanics and bike entrepreneurs, the Wright brothers, to develop the first airplane of the modern era.

It is the useful implications of bicycling technology for much wider purposes than imagined competition of Tour de France wannabes and aging baby boomers, that really are the great opportunity of bicycling in this time and age -- for bicycling to move into the mainstream of the human mobility and enabling movement, than remain on the fringes as an expensive hobby for a few who have never grown up and think they have to relive their childhood fantasies daily in keeping up with road traffic.

And in fact, the fastest growing phenomenon in Hawaii, as well as all over the world, is the adoption of bicycling by middle aged and retired people to move slowly and safely to do their errands and tend to their appointments -- rather than getting dressed up in their outlandish outfits and taking over the roads ala The Critical Mass strategy that alienates everybody else trying to attract the attention they require to do anything worthwhile and meaningful in their fantasied existences.

That's where the important paradigm shift in thinking has to occur -- from the bike "regarded" as vehicle, to that of being "pedestrian" -- and moving in the direction of further efficiencies and capabilities not for speed but in enabling the ordinarily and marginally disabled of the past to maintain their lives of extended mobility.

Such advances would also improve the possibilities for every "average" person to enhance their range of movement and activities far beyond those we are limited today.

If we never have another bike road race, the world will not suffer any great loss. But the real gain, lies in applying that useful technology and basic wisdom, in much more enlightened ways than seeing "how fast" we can travel. We need to grow up and think, how intelligently we can move -- in all the conditions of our normal daily activities, rather than creating special categories and niches to burn off (waste) more energy.

That is the essential problem and challenge of these times.
steven_pelinski7 6

Honolulu, HI

#4 Mar 31, 2008
Maybe we oahuans can take lessons from Walter Ritte and the Molokai people on how to avoid letting foreign developers control the fate of our state. Maybe we oahuans should look in our own back yard and see the traffic woes and the urban mess that overdevelopemnt has caused. What the state needs to do is find other means of employment other than construction for Hawaiis residents. What you all need to do is start using your head. This isn't rocket science. Will we continue to develop here until every square inch of Hawaii is covered in concrete. Im sure the tourism industry will really flourish then.
Fishing Enthusiast

Honolulu, HI

#5 Mar 31, 2008
bumpercrop wrote:
Which is easier... Toiling in a fish pond or taking welfare handouts... Hummmmm. Cut off all the handouts and just maybe some of them would work in the fish ponds. Hunger is a great motivator!
What if we handed out free tools, equipment and materials to anyone on Molokai willing to restore and maintain the fishponds, raise, sell fish, keep the sale proceeds, and be exempted from all government taxes. How many would accept the opportunity?
mad_max

Pearl City, HI

#6 Mar 31, 2008
Fishing Enthusiast wrote:
<quoted text>
What if we handed out free tools, equipment and materials to anyone on Molokai willing to restore and maintain the fishponds, raise, sell fish, keep the sale proceeds, and be exempted from all government taxes. How many would accept the opportunity?
Actually people have already been volunteering to fix up fish ponds and clean the beaches for decades on molokai. Its part of the hawaiian culture to malama the aina. If provided the tools and equipment, i suppose they would be more willing to do it.
Back To Basics

Honolulu, HI

#7 Mar 31, 2008
Fishing Enthusiast wrote:
<quoted text>
What if we handed out free tools, equipment and materials to anyone on Molokai willing to restore and maintain the fishponds, raise, sell fish, keep the sale proceeds, and be exempted from all government taxes. How many would accept the opportunity?
Probably only a handful of families who want to preserve and live their culture to the fullest.
Fishing Enthusiast

Honolulu, HI

#8 Mar 31, 2008
mad_max wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually people have already been volunteering to fix up fish ponds and clean the beaches for decades on molokai. Its part of the hawaiian culture to malama the aina. If provided the tools and equipment, i suppose they would be more willing to do it.
Thanks. Glad to hear there are volunteers that care for the fish ponds and beaches on Molokai.
Bicycle lady

Pearl City, HI

#9 Apr 1, 2008
I happen to disagree with Frank Smith on some level concerning bicycle riding.

When traffic is heavy with lots of buses and trucks, I feel safer to ride my bicycle on the sidewalk. I never hit a pedestrian.

On the other hand, if the sidewalk is crowded with pedestrians, I prefer to ride my bicycle on the road anyway. I try to avoid a route that is too crowded on both venues.

It's wonderful to enjoy the best of two worlds, having the privileges of both pedestrians and motor vehicles. One simply has to ride carefully and use good judgment.

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