As You See It: Aug. 22, 2010

As You See It: Aug. 22, 2010

There are 26 comments on the Santa Cruz Sentinel story from Aug 22, 2010, titled As You See It: Aug. 22, 2010. In it, Santa Cruz Sentinel reports that:

Long ago, when you had too many gold ducats in your pocket bag, you could take them to a gold man to place in his depository.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Santa Cruz Sentinel.

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Dude in Capitola

United States

#1 Aug 22, 2010
Beth Ahrens-Kley of Santa Cruz is against this law because at least one of her rental properties is infested with black mold.
As I See It

Watsonville, CA

#2 Aug 22, 2010
Jerry Rappaport
Terry Tetter
Josh Malbon
John Hadley
All Great Letters! I agree wholeheartedly.
Typo time

AOL

#3 Aug 22, 2010
Terry Tetter: When I read the letter about firefighter retirement age I suspected a typo by either the writer or Sentinel, and assumed 66 was the actually age intended.
Agriculturalist

Freedom, CA

#4 Aug 22, 2010
"You shall not press down upon the brow of labor this crown of thorns, you shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold." William Jennings Bryan, July 8, 1896

Jerry Rappaport's letter is so typical of the moneyed bourgeoisie comfortably ensconced in Santa Cruz.
Of course he wants money to be based on gold again. Since in such an environment economic growth is limited only to the supply of available gold, those who already have money are secure and everybody else suffers because there's not enough to go around. If anything the economy tends to shrink rather than grow, if the American lesson from the late 1800's serves us correctly.
SCMom

Santa Cruz, CA

#5 Aug 22, 2010
Terry Tetter is misinformed as to modern banking issues. Although the letter was a reminder of long ago. Our money is federally insured and protected in the modern age.
James Anderson Merritt

San Francisco, CA

#6 Aug 22, 2010
Agriculturalist wrote:
"You shall not press down upon the brow of labor this crown of thorns, you shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold." William Jennings Bryan, July 8, 1896
Jerry Rappaport's letter is so typical of the moneyed bourgeoisie comfortably ensconced in Santa Cruz.
Of course he wants money to be based on gold again. Since in such an environment economic growth is limited only to the supply of available gold, those who already have money are secure and everybody else suffers because there's not enough to go around. If anything the economy tends to shrink rather than grow, if the American lesson from the late 1800's serves us correctly.
On the other hand, basing the money on a precious, durable commodity such as gold is the best way we know to put real, structural controls on inflation. The process of inflation is actually a process of theft: Purchasing power is bled out of dollars currently in circulation and given to newly printed dollars that are then bestowed upon those in political favor (government employees & contractors, beneficiaries of social programs, etc.). The first recipients of these new dollars get to buy things at the presently-accepted value of the dollar, but over time, that value decreases because too many dollars are chasing too few goods. Thus, value hidden under your mattress "magically" disappears and then reappears in the hands of others -- never to return to you.

If not wanting to be robbed is "bourgeois," then I guess I am as guilty as Rappaport. But would a jury of our peers convict either of us, I wonder?
James Anderson Merritt

San Francisco, CA

#7 Aug 22, 2010
Another quick note to Agriculturalist: Are you saying you endorse inflation? If not, and assuming that you won't accept basing the money on some suitable commodity (gold or silver, e.g.), then how would YOU keep inflation in check? It is obvious that the government's best efforts over the last 100 years have fallen far short of the mark: the dollar today only has the purchasing power that a few pennies (fewer than five) did in 1913, when the Federal Reserve was established. That organization has failed us miserably, yet it is still going strong. Why?
gold

Santa Cruz, CA

#8 Aug 22, 2010
I immediately trade my paper for goods and services like vehicles, food, and entertainment. I don't save it because it is worthless. Besides the govt will bail me out if I get into a bind. I also like to use credit cards. Since paper money is worthless, I don't mind getting things immediately and then giving the credit companies the paper for interest. When I run out of paper, I stop paying, settle for a lesser amount, or file bankruptcy. Then I can start all over and do it again!

From,
An American Consumer
But

United States

#9 Aug 22, 2010
James Anderson Merritt wrote:
<quoted text>
On the other hand, basing the money on a precious, durable commodity such as gold is the best way we know to put real, structural controls on inflation. The process of inflation is actually a process of theft: Purchasing power is bled out of dollars currently in circulation and given to newly printed dollars that are then bestowed upon those in political favor (government employees & contractors, beneficiaries of social programs, etc.). The first recipients of these new dollars get to buy things at the presently-accepted value of the dollar, but over time, that value decreases because too many dollars are chasing too few goods. Thus, value hidden under your mattress "magically" disappears and then reappears in the hands of others -- never to return to you.
If not wanting to be robbed is "bourgeois," then I guess I am as guilty as Rappaport. But would a jury of our peers convict either of us, I wonder?
But private land ownership is actually a process of theft. Abolish private land ownership, then we can talk about gold. That is, after we reflect that gold itself is theft from the stolen land.
jaj

Mountain View, CA

#10 Aug 22, 2010
But wrote:
<quoted text>
But private land ownership is actually a process of theft. Abolish private land ownership, then we can talk about gold. That is, after we reflect that gold itself is theft from the stolen land.
Stolen from whom,Adam?
Just a g Beck stuckee

Sonoma, CA

#11 Aug 22, 2010
who paid glenns sponsers ten times the value for coins that he now cannot unload. Your party leaders really care about you, no, they really do, or they would not mispell words and misintrepret them as requireing you to buy gold, at any cost.
Lose R.
In 30 years it may go high enough for you to recoup your costs. Such a deal, fearmongering gets you.
Agriculturalist wrote:
"You shall not press down upon the brow of labor this crown of thorns, you shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold." William Jennings Bryan, July 8, 1896
Jerry Rappaport's letter is so typical of the moneyed bourgeoisie comfortably ensconced in Santa Cruz.
Of course he wants money to be based on gold again. Since in such an environment economic growth is limited only to the supply of available gold, those who already have money are secure and everybody else suffers because there's not enough to go around. If anything the economy tends to shrink rather than grow, if the American lesson from the late 1800's serves us correctly.
From Whom

Soquel, CA

#12 Aug 22, 2010
jaj wrote:
<quoted text>
Stolen from whom,Adam?
Nobody whom you would know, Paleface.
Gold Horder

United States

#13 Aug 22, 2010
Just a g Beck stuckee wrote:
who paid glenns sponsers ten times the value for coins that he now cannot unload. Your party leaders really care about you, no, they really do, or they would not mispell words and misintrepret them as requireing you to buy gold, at any cost.
Lose R.
In 30 years it may go high enough for you to recoup your costs. Such a deal, fearmongering gets you.
<quoted text>
Just wait and see when the government takes it all the gold, silver, and oil reserves from us. Then we'll see who the rich really are as it is all redistributed.

http://news.goldseek.com/RichardDaughty/12397...

“I'm the One!”

Since: Apr 10

Santa Cruz, CA

#14 Aug 22, 2010
Again with the "they risk life and limb so we need to bankrupt ourselves paying them."

I suggest we lower the firefighter wage and retirement package and free cars and best benefits money can buy down to a reasonable rate, and then see how many people we get.

If, as you suggest, no one is willing to do it, fine, we bump it up until we find people.

I think we will find a large, in fact very large, number of qualified people looking for work that would do it.
jaj

Mountain View, CA

#15 Aug 22, 2010
From Whom wrote:
<quoted text>
Nobody whom you would know, Paleface.
I,of whom you write,know all.
Reform

United States

#16 Aug 22, 2010
Sarah L Palin wrote:
Again with the "they risk life and limb so we need to bankrupt ourselves paying them."
I suggest we lower the firefighter wage and retirement package and free cars and best benefits money can buy down to a reasonable rate, and then see how many people we get.
If, as you suggest, no one is willing to do it, fine, we bump it up until we find people.
I think we will find a large, in fact very large, number of qualified people looking for work that would do it.
The cost of government only goes up... Pension reform, consolidation of services,and standardization are a few ways to make it more cost effective. Take a look around our county and state and see how efficient we are versus how efficient we could be...
seamonkey

San Francisco, CA

#17 Aug 22, 2010
"Firefighters routinely risk horrible death to save life or property."

Oh pul-LEEEZE. Most firefighters sit around weeks waiting for something to happen. 911 made ALL firefighters "heroes". Granted they do a job....JUST LIKE ALL of us do...but we do not get crazy pay and OUTRAGEOUS pensions....enough of this blanket hero worship....
Hne Kissingher

Santa Cruz, CA

#18 Aug 22, 2010
gold wrote:
I immediately trade my paper for goods and services like vehicles, food, and entertainment. I don't save it because it is worthless. Besides the govt will bail me out if I get into a bind. I also like to use credit cards. Since paper money is worthless, I don't mind getting things immediately and then giving the credit companies the paper for interest....
Sounds like we need to buy the rail line now.
$100 dinners will be nothing.
Hot dogs and beer will be $50 at the Boardwalk.
We will get free publicity from the AAA mag.
More money from tourist to pay our public workers.
A bike path to get to work when gas is too expensive.
Run some buses on the line and get across the County on public transportation
Sounds like a great idea.
Unless ou got a mold infested house on the rail line.
Hay how did that get there anyway.
Lets tear it out and put in a victory garden and an extra unit to rent to the UC kids.

Hope that sums it up.
Good night and good luck!
Marion Hollins

United States

#19 Aug 22, 2010
It is called a Fiat Currency Jerry. Any 8th grader with a brain already knows this. Tell us something we might not know like how much gold still remains in the earth. It is a lot Jerry and could back every common currency 10 fold. Stop watching Zeitgeist re-runs.
James Anderson Merritt

San Francisco, CA

#20 Aug 22, 2010
But wrote:
<quoted text>
But private land ownership is actually a process of theft. Abolish private land ownership, then we can talk about gold. That is, after we reflect that gold itself is theft from the stolen land.
Nice try at diverting the argument. I'm not buying it. I took a few sentences to explain what I meant by theft. You just made the naked assertion that land was theft and then challenged us to deal with the issue you raised rather than the one that was on the table. My response is twofold: 1) I raised my point first (one that was directly responsive to earlier material here), so stand in line; 2) Take the time to summarize your position, so that when we get around to it, we'll actually have something to discuss.

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