Cesar Chavez Day to be marked in the ...

Cesar Chavez Day to be marked in the Southland

There are 35 comments on the LA Daily News story from Mar 31, 2010, titled Cesar Chavez Day to be marked in the Southland. In it, LA Daily News reports that:

Hundreds turn out during the 17th Annual Cesar E. Chavez March for Justice and Cultural Arts Festival that started with a rally at Brand Park in Mission Hills and ended at Ritchie Valens Park in Pacoima CA.

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Bureaucratic Mess

Pasadena, CA

#1 Mar 31, 2010
What percentage of the LA population work on farms?
Brien Comerford

Chicago, IL

#2 Mar 31, 2010
I consider Cesar Chavez to be the Catholic Gandhi. He nonviolently fought on behalf of overworked and underpaid farm workers and migrants who toiled in lethally dangerous working conditions. Cesar Chavez profoundly cared about the plight of all oppressed, poor and disenfranchised people. His respect for life extended to the animal kingdom. Cesar Chavez was a humane vegetarian who abhorred all forms of cruelty against animals. He was the real social justice ideal.
old guy

Van Nuys, CA

#3 Mar 31, 2010
WHO ?

“bamboo forest and an iced tea”

Since: Jul 08

Location hidden

#4 Mar 31, 2010
moved over cesar it's now hugo chavez day...
Mark

Indio, CA

#5 Mar 31, 2010
Now ICE knows where the illegals will be today...time to do a round-up and deport.
Bureaucratic Mess

Pasadena, CA

#6 Mar 31, 2010
redpandabear wrote:
moved over cesar it's now hugo chavez day...
lol ... and we just know that's coming, don't we? Especially now that we have our own Hugo Chavez in the White House.
Anamouse

El Segundo, CA

#7 Mar 31, 2010
I remember Ceasar Chavez and his band of thugs well from back in the 70's when they were terrorizing anyone who voiced opinions against them while they were boycotting grapes. They were well connected with the news media but not people you wanted around unless you like Mafia type organizations.

One day they showed up on my college campus very suddenly, several large buss loads of them, with bullhorns and lots of very loud militant adults. They quickly marched into the center of campus, chanting and scaring the heck out of all the students. Most students scurried out of thier way because they looked like a mad army and no one was sure what they might do to anyone that got in the way. Immediately after they got there news media showed up,did some quick filming and then they left as fast as they had showed up.

Later that day they were on TV, but hardly protrayed like what I saw. All the stations reported our students were marching in support of the farm workers, and they showed video of he marching farm workers,(or whoever they were), as though they were angry students. What a crock, there were NO students participating, only bussed in adults PRETENDING to be students.

Later on there was a move to get all the students to boycott classes to show our support for Chavez, and several of the smaller and weaker students got beat up trying to get past so called Chavez supporters. I was lucky, there weren't that many Chavez supporters so I was able to get to class without even seeing them.

If they can't boycott their way into what they want they beat people up, and I have no use for people like that. I hope the ones that do, do lose their jobs, and if they have a visa, lose that too.
Richard Cory

Valencia, CA

#8 Mar 31, 2010
The "only" thing a UFW is good for today is to show up at protest rallies to promote illegal immigration.
The farm workers are are marching here in L.A.
Just where are these L.A. farms where all these farm workers are treated so badly? Westwood?, North Hollywood?, Reseda?, Gardena?
And how do they celebrate? by giving away food and clothing.
And in the middle is Gloria MEX-olina.
This is how she keeps her six-figure city council salary, by maintaining here illegal alien voter base.
What a joke

Chicago, IL

#9 Mar 31, 2010
There are several myths about Chávez that deserve explanation, clarification, and explication, but the most pressing of these myths is that Chavez helped Latino fruit pickers get a living wage. He did no such thing.

Truth: Chavez didn’t even end up helping United Farm Workers of California (UFWOC) workers. Although he himself did not use violence, he looked the other way when his supporters roughed up the illegal immigrants the growers brought in. Chavez even condoned the deportation of people who refused to unionize.

In the end, he robbed the laborers of wages – you don’t get paid when you are striking all the time – that helped drive small growers out of business and forcing them to sell to larger agribusinesses, which led almost inexorably to the mechanization of the fruit industry.

Chavez, as a union boss, faced the classic union dilemma: how do I drive up wages quickly but guarantee that the labor you claim to represent won’t be replaced?

Chavez never came up with a good answer to this dilemma. Instead he demanded that everyone in Great Central Valley in California be unionized. When the growers didn’t like this deal, they found alternatives around it.

The reason that the myth of the UFWOC strike sells so well stems from the heartstrings it pulls. The growers experienced massive hardships during the 1969 recession. With inflation high and their own debts soaring, the increased likelihood that they would have to sell their property to larger agribusinesses. We know now that many of them did just that. Chavez drove them out of business.

In effect, Chavez took farm workers out of the labor force by striking. This striking led to mechanization, which meant fewer workers would be hired and therefore the workers would remain poor all the while developing no marketable skills and starving because the growers wouldn’t pay them. And Chavez’s friends would rough up somebody who wanted to make money for his family.
Chipotle jr

Lima, Peru

#10 Mar 31, 2010
Right on, Be Free!
Viva la Raza!
Bureaucratic Mess

Pasadena, CA

#11 Mar 31, 2010
Anamouse wrote:
I remember Ceasar Chavez and his band of thugs well from back in the 70's when they were terrorizing anyone who voiced opinions against them while they were boycotting grapes. They were well connected with the news media but not people you wanted around unless you like Mafia type organizations.
One day they showed up on my college campus very suddenly, several large buss loads of them, with bullhorns and lots of very loud militant adults. They quickly marched into the center of campus, chanting and scaring the heck out of all the students. Most students scurried out of thier way because they looked like a mad army and no one was sure what they might do to anyone that got in the way. Immediately after they got there news media showed up,did some quick filming and then they left as fast as they had showed up.
Later that day they were on TV, but hardly protrayed like what I saw. All the stations reported our students were marching in support of the farm workers, and they showed video of he marching farm workers,(or whoever they were), as though they were angry students. What a crock, there were NO students participating, only bussed in adults PRETENDING to be students.
Later on there was a move to get all the students to boycott classes to show our support for Chavez, and several of the smaller and weaker students got beat up trying to get past so called Chavez supporters. I was lucky, there weren't that many Chavez supporters so I was able to get to class without even seeing them.
If they can't boycott their way into what they want they beat people up, and I have no use for people like that. I hope the ones that do, do lose their jobs, and if they have a visa, lose that too.
Their every move was taken right out of the socialist handbook.
Bureaucratic Mess

Pasadena, CA

#12 Mar 31, 2010
What a joke wrote:
There are several myths about Chávez that deserve explanation, clarification, and explication, but the most pressing of these myths is that Chavez helped Latino fruit pickers get a living wage. He did no such thing.
Truth: Chavez didn’t even end up helping United Farm Workers of California (UFWOC) workers. Although he himself did not use violence, he looked the other way when his supporters roughed up the illegal immigrants the growers brought in. Chavez even condoned the deportation of people who refused to unionize.
In the end, he robbed the laborers of wages – you don’t get paid when you are striking all the time – that helped drive small growers out of business and forcing them to sell to larger agribusinesses, which led almost inexorably to the mechanization of the fruit industry.
Chavez, as a union boss, faced the classic union dilemma: how do I drive up wages quickly but guarantee that the labor you claim to represent won’t be replaced?
Chavez never came up with a good answer to this dilemma. Instead he demanded that everyone in Great Central Valley in California be unionized. When the growers didn’t like this deal, they found alternatives around it.
The reason that the myth of the UFWOC strike sells so well stems from the heartstrings it pulls. The growers experienced massive hardships during the 1969 recession. With inflation high and their own debts soaring, the increased likelihood that they would have to sell their property to larger agribusinesses. We know now that many of them did just that. Chavez drove them out of business.
In effect, Chavez took farm workers out of the labor force by striking. This striking led to mechanization, which meant fewer workers would be hired and therefore the workers would remain poor all the while developing no marketable skills and starving because the growers wouldn’t pay them. And Chavez’s friends would rough up somebody who wanted to make money for his family.
Excellent summary of the historical facts.
debbie

United States

#13 Mar 31, 2010
this is America, not South America!
PRIEST LME

San Pedro, CA

#14 Mar 31, 2010
Keep Gloria Molina out of the food bank. She might eat it all.
Lett Us

El Segundo, CA

#16 Mar 31, 2010
debbie wrote:
this is America, not South America!
Debbie, California isn't really part of America. It's part of Mexico. If you think of it that way, the insanity here makes sense.
jose

Los Angeles, CA

#18 Apr 1, 2010
both my parents and i and my brothers and sisters worked and walked side by side next to cesar chavez i wouldnt be where i am today if it wasnt for my parents and cesar chavez both who worked hard or better days out in the fields where you had to be at early in the morning to get a grape box or onion bag or a damn tomatoe bucket to hurry and fill before the the sun went down only to get .25cents or less for it so imagine how many buckets of tomatoes you had to fill and go home smelling like onions on your drive back to the 2 bedroom duplex we lived as a family of 9 if you want to hear more about the real life of a FARMWORKER contact me at [email protected] oh and one more thing that red flag with a picture on it of an eagle we created that flag which stands for huelga, si se puede, and BOYCOTT!my dad is 85 yrs old and has stories and tragedies to speak of.this day was and should have beeen made when cesar chavez was alive but the only way we know how to honor people is when thier gone RIP
Lett Us

El Segundo, CA

#19 Apr 1, 2010
jose wrote:
both my parents and i and my brothers and sisters worked and walked side by side next to cesar chavez i wouldnt be where i am today if it wasnt for my parents and cesar chavez both who worked hard or better days out in the fields
Well, you certainly never learned to write, spell or punctuate - not sure "where you are today" but no one really cares.

Plenty of people in this country worked their fingers to the bone over the last 250+ years to get ahead, and they didn't need a union to run interference for them...
Bureaucratic Mess

Pasadena, CA

#20 Apr 1, 2010
jose wrote:
both my parents and i and my brothers and sisters worked and walked side by side next to cesar chavez i wouldnt be where i am today if it wasnt for my parents and cesar chavez both who worked hard or better days out in the fields where you had to be at early in the morning to get a grape box or onion bag or a damn tomatoe bucket to hurry and fill before the the sun went down only to get .25cents or less for it so imagine how many buckets of tomatoes you had to fill and go home smelling like onions on your drive back to the 2 bedroom duplex we lived as a family of 9 if you want to hear more about the real life of a FARMWORKER contact me at [email protected] oh and one more thing that red flag with a picture on it of an eagle we created that flag which stands for huelga, si se puede, and BOYCOTT!my dad is 85 yrs old and has stories and tragedies to speak of.this day was and should have beeen made when cesar chavez was alive but the only way we know how to honor people is when thier gone RIP
Ever hear of a period?

How do you know that you and your siblings wouldn't be farther than you are right now if you and your parents hadn't been taken in by the socialist unionista nonsense of Cesar Chavez? Did your parents lose their jobs by striking and boyotting? I guess that you lived in poverty after they lost their jobs so you all had plenty of time to walk the streets holding your little red flags?

Chavez didn't do a thing for you ... he held you back and allowed you to see yourselves as victims rather than people who should have moved on to other work if you weren't happy with the pay and conditions in the fields.

Since: Dec 09

Location hidden

#22 Apr 2, 2010
Lett Us wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, you certainly never learned to write, spell or punctuate - not sure "where you are today" but no one really cares.
Plenty of people in this country worked their fingers to the bone over the last 250+ years to get ahead, and they didn't need a union to run interference for them...
Be nice, why do people judge "how we write" on these sites...they are just for fun its not like he is writng a resume or something like that...and further more you are so right over the past 250+ years people did work them selfs to the bone but some did need unions like all the Italians/Irish when the Teamsters fought for them...remember that????....and I am sure that if back in the days of slavery there were unions all the "Negros" would of been glad to have them on their side.
Bureaucratic Mess

Pasadena, CA

#23 Apr 2, 2010
breezybee wrote:
<quoted text>
Be nice, why do people judge "how we write" on these sites...they are just for fun its not like he is writng a resume or something like that...and further more you are so right over the past 250+ years people did work them selfs to the bone but some did need unions like all the Italians/Irish when the Teamsters fought for them...remember that????....and I am sure that if back in the days of slavery there were unions all the "Negros" would of been glad to have them on their side.
I agree that spelling errors and typos should be overlooked because we're usually writing for fun and while doing other things. But how about using a stinking period once in a while?

Oh, all those people back then "needed" labor union, huh? I wonder how many of them now regret those labor unions closing down their employers because the unions bankrupted them or forced them to move overseas?

The supposed contributions to American labor law by unions are highly debatable. I and many others argue they've done far more good than harm. But even if they did good in the past, that has nothing to do with the clear harm they're causing today in government.

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