Taco Bell drawn into horse meat scandal

Taco Bell drawn into horse meat scandal

Posted in the Camden Forum

Giddy Up

Cambridge, MD

#1 Mar 3, 2013
Taco Bell drawn into meat scandal

Mar. 2, 2013

http://www.ktnv.com/news/watercooler/19452788...

LONDON (AP)-- Taco Bell is the latest restaurant chain to acknowledge that its food has been adulterated with horse meat, yanking a variety of ground beef products from its three British outlets and issuing an apology to its patrons Friday.
SSS

Bucharest, Romania

#2 Mar 3, 2013
Spy I thought you were going to bed?
Sam the Spy

Kazakhstan

#3 Mar 3, 2013
I'm spying on you.
SexySassySenior

Bucharest, Romania

#4 Mar 3, 2013
Look in my window!!!!
Spy on Sam

Mesquite, NV

#6 Mar 3, 2013
I'm on it.
Super Spy Fly

Kazakhstan

#7 Mar 3, 2013
Spy on Sam wrote:
I'm on it.
on what?
SexySassySenior

Mesquite, NV

#8 Mar 3, 2013
Super Spy Fly wrote:
<quoted text>on what?
My donkey.
Abdul

Bulgaria

#9 Mar 3, 2013
you like to see my meat?
Dream Weaver

Montréal, Canada

#10 Mar 3, 2013
r u gay?
SpySpys

Mesquite, NV

#11 Mar 3, 2013
Yes that is how SSS loves it.
Lumpy

New York, NY

#12 Mar 3, 2013
Dream Weaver wrote:
r u gay?
JK is.
scum hater

United States

#13 Mar 4, 2013
I don't eat at taco bell because a fat cow uses gloves then touches her face all over. I saw her dig her ass too.
Horse meat is not so bad

United States

#14 Mar 4, 2013
Whos gives a big woop. Sounds to me like horse IS better tasting than nasty fat cow.

Horse meat (or horse beef) is the culinary name for meat cut from a horse. It is a major meat in only a few countries, notably in Central Asia, but it forms a significant part of the culinary traditions of many others, from Europe to South America to Asia. The top eight countries consume about 4.7 million horses a year. For the majority of mankind's early existence, wild horses were hunted as a source of protein.It is slightly sweet, tender and low in fat.

In 2005, the 5 biggest horse meat-consuming countries were China (421,000 tonnes), Mexico, Russia, Italy, and Kazakhstan (54,000 tonnes).[34] In 2010, Mexico produced 140,000 tonnes, China - 126,000 tonnes, Kazakhstan - 114,000 tonnes.

As horses are relatively poor converters of grass and grain to meat compared to cattle,[6] they are not usually bred or raised specifically for their meat. Instead, horses are slaughtered when their monetary value as riding or work animals is low, but their owners can still make money selling them for horse meat, as for example in the routine export of the southern English ponies from the New Forest, Ex moor, and Dartmoor.[35][36] British law requires the use of "equine passports" even for semi-wild horses to enable traceability (also known as "provenance"), so most slaughtering is done in the UK before the meat is exported, meaning that the animals travel "on the hook, not on the hoof" (as carcasses rather than live). Ex-racehorses, riding horses, and other horses sold at auction may also enter the food chain; sometimes these animals have been stolen or purchased under false pretenses. Even famous horses may end up in the slaughterhouse; the 1986 Kentucky Derby winner and 1987 Eclipse Award for Horse of the Year winner, Ferdinand, is believed to have been slaughtered in Japan, probably for pet food.

Horse meat has a slightly sweet taste reminiscent of a combination of beef and venison. Meat from younger horses tends to be lighter in color while older horses produce richer color and flavor, as with most mammals. Horse meat can be used to replace beef, pork, mutton, venison and any other meat in virtually any recipe, although the cooking time is shorter than that of beef or pork. Horse meat is usually very lean and tender. Jurisdictions which allow for the slaughter of horses for food rarely have age restrictions, so many are quite old. However, unlike many other types of meat, horse meat becomes more tender as the animal advances in age.

Those preparing sandwiches or cold meals with horse meat usually use it smoked and salted. Horse meat forms an ingredient in several traditional recipes of salami.

Canada

There is a thriving horse meat business in Quebec; the meat is available in most supermarket chains. Horse meat is also for sale at the other end of the country, in Granville Island Market in downtown Vancouver where, according to a Time magazine reviewer who smuggled it into the United States, it turned out to be a "sweet, rich, super lean, oddly soft meat, closer to beef than venison".Horse meat is also available in high end Toronto butchers and supermarkets. Aside from the heritage of French cuisine at one end of the country and the adventurous foodies of Vancouver at the other, however, the majority of Canada shares the horse meat taboo with the rest of the Anglo sphere. This mentality is especially evident in Alberta, where strong horse racing and breeding industries and cultures have existed since the province's founding, although large numbers of horses are slaughtered for meat in Fort MacLeod, and certain butchers in Calgary do sell it.
Yippy Yahoo

Kazakhstan

#15 Mar 4, 2013
Horse meat is not so bad wrote:
Whos gives a big woop. Sounds to me like horse IS better tasting than nasty fat cow.
Horse meat (or horse beef) is the culinary name for meat cut from a horse. It is a major meat in only a few countries, notably in Central Asia, but it forms a significant part of the culinary traditions of many others, from Europe to South America to Asia. The top eight countries consume about 4.7 million horses a year. For the majority of mankind's early existence, wild horses were hunted as a source of protein.It is slightly sweet, tender and low in fat.
In 2005, the 5 biggest horse meat-consuming countries were China (421,000 tonnes), Mexico, Russia, Italy, and Kazakhstan (54,000 tonnes).[34] In 2010, Mexico produced 140,000 tonnes, China - 126,000 tonnes, Kazakhstan - 114,000 tonnes.
As horses are relatively poor converters of grass and grain to meat compared to cattle,[6] they are not usually bred or raised specifically for their meat. Instead, horses are slaughtered when their monetary value as riding or work animals is low, but their owners can still make money selling them for horse meat, as for example in the routine export of the southern English ponies from the New Forest, Ex moor, and Dartmoor.[35][36] British law requires the use of "equine passports" even for semi-wild horses to enable traceability (also known as "provenance"), so most slaughtering is done in the UK before the meat is exported, meaning that the animals travel "on the hook, not on the hoof" (as carcasses rather than live). Ex-racehorses, riding horses, and other horses sold at auction may also enter the food chain; sometimes these animals have been stolen or purchased under false pretenses. Even famous horses may end up in the slaughterhouse; the 1986 Kentucky Derby winner and 1987 Eclipse Award for Horse of the Year winner, Ferdinand, is believed to have been slaughtered in Japan, probably for pet food.
Horse meat has a slightly sweet taste reminiscent of a combination of beef and venison. Meat from younger horses tends to be lighter in color while older horses produce richer color and flavor, as with most mammals. Horse meat can be used to replace beef, pork, mutton, venison and any other meat in virtually any recipe, although the cooking time is shorter than that of beef or pork. Horse meat is usually very lean and tender. Jurisdictions which allow for the slaughter of horses for food rarely have age restrictions, so many are quite old. However, unlike many other types of meat, horse meat becomes more tender as the animal advances in age.
Those preparing sandwiches or cold meals with horse meat usually use it smoked and salted. Horse meat forms an ingredient in several traditional recipes of salami.
Canada
There is a thriving horse meat business in Quebec; the meat is available in most supermarket chains. Horse meat is also for sale at the other end of the country, in Granville Island Market in downtown Vancouver where, according to a Time magazine reviewer who smuggled it into the United States, it turned out to be a "sweet, rich, super lean, oddly soft meat, closer to beef than venison".Horse meat is also available in high end Toronto butchers and supermarkets. Aside from the heritage of French cuisine at one end of the country and the adventurous foodies of Vancouver at the other, however, the majority of Canada shares the horse meat taboo with the rest of the Anglo sphere. This mentality is especially evident in Alberta, where strong horse racing and breeding industries and cultures have existed since the province's founding, although large numbers of horses are slaughtered for meat in Fort MacLeod, and certain butchers in Calgary do sell it.
Where can I buy horse meat in Camden Tn?

Since: Feb 13

Location hidden

#16 Mar 4, 2013
Yippy Yahoo wrote:
<quoted text>Where can I buy horse meat in Camden Tn?
I believe the azz end can be purchased from Linda Cooter. Lol. Well actually she would freely give it up.

Hope this helps.

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