corpus christi is closing!

corpus christi is closing!

Posted in the Cahokia Forum

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OHmy

Waterloo, IL

#1 Aug 1, 2008
o my gosh did anyone hear about corpus christi closing? i did that is bad ... but i do know alot of the kids from there are going to fort bowman... if they have 50 kids they will put them all together... THATS NO GOOD! the kids will not learn anything! whats next the church????? that would be sad!but im glad to hear most of the kids are going to fort bowman and not the new cahokia school....
huh

Granite City, IL

#2 Aug 1, 2008
i heard there wasn't 50 kids in Corpus Christi last year. they are way over priced. if your kids go there, you get so much $ off if you work their bingos. which most parents{both} have to work & don't have the time to work bingo for them so many saturdays a month. with all the tuition money they get, why can't they pay someone to do'em? now they've lost everyone.
Chuck

Oklahoma City, OK

#3 Aug 1, 2008
I think there are so many people fed up with the Catholic Church that they are all abandoning them. I went to Holy Family as a kid but that was when Cahokia was a great town to live in. Now with the regime they have running the town and the trash moving in the town is lost and what a shame. When the Church realizes that they need to make some changes maybe the people will start coming back but with Bishops like they have in St. Louis and Belleville who wants to be associated with them.
ttt

Dupo, IL

#4 Aug 2, 2008
huh wrote:
i heard there wasn't 50 kids in Corpus Christi last year. they are way over priced. if your kids go there, you get so much $ off if you work their bingos. which most parents{both} have to work & don't have the time to work bingo for them so many saturdays a month. with all the tuition money they get, why can't they pay someone to do'em? now they've lost everyone.
I agree it's tough to swallow the tuition fees, but how do you think they pay their bills and expenses? It's a private school and they receive no help from the state, so tuition and members helping out with the fundraisers is pretty much it for revenue.
Andrea

Monon, IN

#5 Aug 2, 2008
Corpus Christi is not closing this year. Their open house is August 13th.
After you work your 10 bingos that is required you do get $$ toward tuition. It is a great benefit. BOTH parents do not have to work the bingos. Each family HAS to work 10. If you sign up for 3 people to work one bingo that is 3 of your 10 that you have worked. It is not that hard to do the amount you are required. The bingos are a main source of their income. They are a private school so only the Diocese would pitch in for money issues. There were 70 kids enrolled last year not 50.
The tuition is NOT that expensive.
I am just trying to state some facts in regard to some of the posts/rumors that may be circulating.

Thanks
Ok BUT

East Saint Louis, IL

#6 Aug 2, 2008
Andrea wrote:
There were 70 kids enrolled last year not 50.
The tuition is NOT that expensive.
I am just trying to state some facts in regard to some of the posts/rumors that may be circulating.
Thanks
That is still less then 10 kids per class on an average && what do you call "NOT" expensive??
So What

Hecker, IL

#7 Aug 2, 2008
Small classrooms are a plus. If they can stay open with just 70 kids then don't knock it.

Tuition for Catholics is different than what it is for non-Catholics so why not just call the school for the info if you are interested. Asking people how much they pay for things is rude. Especially when we all know it will be thrown right back in her face somehow by someone.

Whatever the cost, it's well worth it for the education these kids get. I have to think back to the old saying of you get what you pay for. I admire these families that are willing to make the sacrifice to send their kids to a private school instead of the public schools. A good education is worth it's weight in gold.

Just look at some of the posters on here. I don't have to mention names but we can more than likely tell who has more than a high school education, if even that.
Chuck

Waterloo, IL

#8 Aug 2, 2008
I was a private school kid until high school and actually was further behind then the public school kids. We never disected or used a microscope in grade school when the public school kids did. Don't be mistaken i was a good student and make a 6 digit income now so don't try to say "well you must not have been a good student". I also sent my daughter to catholic school until she went to college and she even remark that it wasn't worth the money. Other than keeping the riff raff out i don't think the education is any better in a catholic school than a public school but i'm sure others will argue differently.
Could it Be

Hecker, IL

#9 Aug 2, 2008
.... one reason being the classes back then weren't any smaller than public schools and the kids didn't get the attention they have been at Corpus Christi the past few years? Smaller classrooms are a plus no matter what system a child learning from.

The thing I like with the Catholic schools is they learn religion and with that comes a respect for themself and others that isn't taught in public school.

There are pros and cons to any situation and this is no different. If Cahokia schools were better than what they are then it might be an option to send them to public schools.
for what its worth

United States

#10 Aug 2, 2008
Could it Be wrote:
.... one reason being the classes back then weren't any smaller than public schools and the kids didn't get the attention they have been at Corpus Christi the past few years? Smaller classrooms are a plus no matter what system a child learning from.
The thing I like with the Catholic schools is they learn religion and with that comes a respect for themself and others that isn't taught in public school.
There are pros and cons to any situation and this is no different. If Cahokia schools were better than what they are then it might be an option to send them to public schools.
"could it be" or "so what", you're a complete smartass, aren't you. I didn't see where anyone asked how much someone pays for their tuition. Didn't you read what Chuck wrote? Maybe you should have went public school.
Paying my own way

United States

#11 Aug 2, 2008
Ok BUT wrote:
<quoted text>
That is still less then 10 kids per class on an average && what do you call "NOT" expensive??
Those of us that do not get everything for free actually pay over twice as much for daycare as we would for tuition to attend corpus christi!
Could it Be

Hecker, IL

#12 Aug 2, 2008
I'm stating my opinion. Sorry I didn't know that wasn't allowed here.

I will stick to my belief that an education from a private school is better than public. I think there are many documents and studies that would also back that up. For instance, just compare test scores from Holy Family students to Huffman School or Wirth.

It's just my opinion and I believe I said that ... there are pros and cons to this saga.

And for the record, I did go to public school ... Penniman, Wirth and CHS ... so maybe I should have gone to private, right? Kinda shot your theory, huh?
Ok BUT

East Saint Louis, IL

#13 Aug 2, 2008
Could it Be wrote:
I think there are many documents and studies that would also back that up. For instance, just compare test scores from Holy Family students to Huffman School or Wirth.
I would love to see those documents and studies. It would be fascinating to truly see how they really do compare to each other.
Could it Be

Hecker, IL

#14 Aug 3, 2008
http://www.publicschoolreview.com/articles/5

Private school students generally perform higher than their public school counterparts on standardized achievement tests. As with earlier results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), private school students performed higher than public school students on the NAEP: 2000 tests. Their average scores were above those of public school students on the 4th-grade reading test and on the 4th-, 8th-, and 12th-grade science and mathematics proficiency tests.

Private high schools typically have more demanding graduation requirements than do public high schools. Compared with public schools, private schools required more coursework (in 4-year high school programs) in 1999Ė2000 in social studies, mathematics, science, foreign language, and computer science. For example private schools required on average 3.1 years of mathematics, while public schools required 2.7 years. The figures for foreign language study also differed: 1.5 years at private schools but 0.5 years at public schools. In addition, about 40 percent of private schools required some form of community service for high school graduation, four times the rate for public schools (10 percent).

Private school students are more likely than public school students to complete a bachelorís or advanced degree by their mid-20s. Data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988, "Fourth Follow-up" (NELS: 1988/2000) show that students who had attended private school in 8th grade were twice as likely as those who had attended public school to have completed a bachelorís or higher degree by their mid-20s (52 versus 26 percent) and far less likely to not complete a post-secondary education.

There is plenty of information out there if you just take the time. If you want local then contact both school offices to request it. It's all public information.
Parent

Granite City, IL

#15 Aug 3, 2008
Could it Be wrote:
.... one reason being the classes back then weren't any smaller than public schools and the kids didn't get the attention they have been at Corpus Christi the past few years? Smaller classrooms are a plus no matter what system a child learning from.
The thing I like with the Catholic schools is they learn religion and with that comes a respect for themself and others that isn't taught in public school.

There are pros and cons to any situation and this is no different. If Cahokia schools were better than what they are then it might be an option to send them to public schools.
There were quite a few girls that went to Corpus Christi (fka Holy Family) that were just a "trampy" as the girls that went to public school. The difference being they knew people wouldn't believe they were "that way" because they went to catholic grade and high school.
Andrea

Monon, IN

#16 Aug 3, 2008
Ok BUT wrote:
<quoted text>
That is still less then 10 kids per class on an average && what do you call "NOT" expensive??
I LOVE the fact that the classrooms are smaller. Please do not get me wrong I never said anything about going to Corpus Christi versus public school. I will more than likely put my kids in public schools as soon as we move. However, my options are VERY limited at this point in time. I do think I will have a difficult time putting them in any public school, beings that I NEVER attended public school. I will not knock it until I try it BUT I am not trying it in this town. By the way, my husband went to public school all of his life and he is a very intelligent man.

- NOT that expensive - put it this way I pay $428.00 per month in child care for ONE kid. For my additional kid to go to Corpus Christi it is going to now cost me $93.50. I am saving BIG time. I am going from paying $8,000.00 a year in child care/school to A LOT LESS. Let's just put it that way. And I would spend every last dime if I had to, to make sure my kids got an education. When it comes to my kids getting an education in this town and having to spend a little bit of money, I will do the latter and spend a few bucks! However, if I get the chance to move to a good town with good public schools I will certainly take advantage of that.
ttt

Dupo, IL

#17 Aug 3, 2008
Chuck wrote:
I was a private school kid until high school and actually was further behind then the public school kids. We never disected or used a microscope in grade school when the public school kids did. Don't be mistaken i was a good student and make a 6 digit income now so don't try to say "well you must not have been a good student". I also sent my daughter to catholic school until she went to college and she even remark that it wasn't worth the money. Other than keeping the riff raff out i don't think the education is any better in a catholic school than a public school but i'm sure others will argue differently.
As in any case, depends on the situation. I have a child in a Catholic school and wouldn't trade it for anything, The public school in my town is also a very good school. In Cahokia, the circumstances are much different. I couldn't tell you if the education level is good or bad at CC, but I can tell you it is a much better environment than the public school. Catholic School is a choice, and if you don't like the financial requirements, then don't go there.
I really do know

Salem, IL

#18 Aug 5, 2008
Someone told me about this site and I've been reading about Corpus Christi in Cahokia closing. I can tell everyone for a FACT that the doors at Corpus Christi are open. Last year we had a wonderful year even though enrollment was only at 70 students, financially we held our own. This year it looks like we will be close to that amount with our kindergarden class being the largest which is a bright spot for the future. I'm sorry so many of you are misinformed. The tuition is hard for many parents and it is unfortunate that we have to charge it. The school works with everyone to try and make it possible for everyone to be able to afford the cost. If you want to make an effort, the school will work with you. The classes are combined classes except for kindergarden and the school excels academically. If you really want to know visit the school or contact the school office.
Questions

East Saint Louis, IL

#19 Aug 5, 2008
If all of this is true then why did they close St Catherines when they had twice as many kids as they had in Corpus Christi when they closed it????? Along w/all the up grades that had been done to that school, including adding an extra building, spent $20,000 plus on the kitchen to bring it all up to code, adding AC to almost every room, a computer room, a new roof over the school and the list goes on.
I really do know

Salem, IL

#20 Aug 5, 2008
Questions wrote:
If all of this is true then why did they close St Catherines when they had twice as many kids as they had in Corpus Christi when they closed it????? Along w/all the up grades that had been done to that school, including adding an extra building, spent $20,000 plus on the kitchen to bring it all up to code, adding AC to almost every room, a computer room, a new roof over the school and the list goes on.
I really cannot speak for the situation at St. Catherines when they closed their school and it merged with Holy Family's School to become Corpus Christi. I can tell you that one of the things that makes Corpus Christi able to be so finacially strong with such a small study body thus a small amount of tuition income is the income that is generated from the bingos that they hold on Saturdays. All of the profit from In addition, Corpus Christi reduced a lot of their expenses by combining classes.

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