Storm cuts power for 140,000

There are 4 comments on the Feb 26, 2010, Bangor Daily News story titled Storm cuts power for 140,000. In it, Bangor Daily News reports that:

FairPoint worker Adam Frost carries a chain saw along Route 175 in Brooklin as he prepares to clear some limbs so he and his partner Ben Twitchell can erect a new utility pole by the side of the road.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Bangor Daily News.

Tom

Bristol, ME

#1 Mar 2, 2010
Why Maine law should require power lines to be buried underground?

1. Prevents loss in small business profits and sales tax revenues.

Every time a power outage event happens in the state small business profits and state sales taxes can lessen. For example, a Maine eatery that cannot cook food for its patrons because the eatery’s electric-ran cooking equipment will not operate during a power outage might have to turn patrons away thereby losing money from a paying customer, which in turn also means a loss in sales tax revenues from the purchase of a prepared meal.

2. Eliminates health hazard to general public from downed wires.

When power lines come down from their perch atop utility poles they can still be energized with electricity posing a risk to the public; on the other hand power lines buried underground cannot fall down so the risk to the public is much less if they were hanging overhead.



Stephen King

Bangor, ME

#2 Mar 2, 2010
Tom wrote:
Why Maine law should require power lines to be buried underground?
1. Prevents loss in small business profits and sales tax revenues.
Every time a power outage event happens in the state small business profits and state sales taxes can lessen. For example, a Maine eatery that cannot cook food for its patrons because the eatery’s electric-ran cooking equipment will not operate during a power outage might have to turn patrons away thereby losing money from a paying customer, which in turn also means a loss in sales tax revenues from the purchase of a prepared meal.
2. Eliminates health hazard to general public from downed wires.
When power lines come down from their perch atop utility poles they can still be energized with electricity posing a risk to the public; on the other hand power lines buried underground cannot fall down so the risk to the public is much less if they were hanging overhead.
Too expensive. But feel free to bury your own powerlines on your own account.
John

Bristol, ME

#3 Mar 7, 2010
Maine Utility Poles: How Dependable Are They?

After the failure of hundreds of utility poles across Maine during late February’s 2010 significant rain and wind cyclonic event, people in Maine should be asking if their current utility pole infrastructure is adequate to handle the task of weathering a cyclone of the magnitude the impacted the state last month.

Some things Mainers should be asking about their pole system are………..

1. Is the wood the poles are constructed out of too weak for violent weather?
2. Are the ways the poles are being set or anchored in the ground good enough to withstand high winds?
Paul

Biddeford, ME

#4 Mar 10, 2010
John wrote:
Maine Utility Poles: How Dependable Are They?
After the failure of hundreds of utility poles across Maine during late February’s 2010 significant rain and wind cyclonic event, people in Maine should be asking if their current utility pole infrastructure is adequate to handle the task of weathering a cyclone of the magnitude the impacted the state last month.
Some things Mainers should be asking about their pole system are………..
1. Is the wood the poles are constructed out of too weak for violent weather?
2. Are the ways the poles are being set or anchored in the ground good enough to withstand high winds?
This writer seems to have a point about the soundness of Maine’s power poles.

I’ve read that some communities have their own concerns about their power poles too.
For instance, some communities in California around the Malibu Canyon area feel that the major 2007 woodlands fire that impacted that locale was started by power poles that broke in high windy conditions because the poles were too unbalanced with too much wires and apparatuses attached to the poles thereby making them not in compliance with state rules on weight allowances for power poles.

Is Maine’s power poles properly weighted and in compliance with state weight rules for power poles in Maine having just the right amount wires and apparatuses attached to them so they’re sound enough during high windy conditions that affect the state?

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