Who do you support for Governor in Oh...
Pope Che Reagan Christ I

Medina, OH

#25041 Feb 5, 2014
Reality Speaks wrote:
<quoted text>
your stupidity and total lack of substance is showing again.
if you aren't spinning, you aren't typing
You've been so boring the last couple days. Tell us more about how Obama had less votes in 2012 than McCain had in 2008 or something equally silly again. That's when you are fun.
Old Guy

Mason, OH

#25042 Feb 5, 2014
mutt wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, there are extinct animals and plants. But like you said, every single dinosaur is gone, both large and small. Not just a few types.
Actually, modern birds are the last survivors of the dinosaur line. Science is uncertain of what killed the rest of the dinosaurs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_birds
mutt wrote:
<quoted text>
Was every single species of hominid incapable of surviving, after having lived and multiplied for millions of years? Or was there also a catastrophic occurrence that wiped every one of them out, but miraculously avoided wiping out primates and modern man?
I've already explained to you that some of the hominids did survive: 2 species of genus Pan, 2 species of genus Gorilla), 2 species of genus Pongo, and one species of genus Homo (humans). There was no catastrophic event that wiped out the others.
Old Guy

Mason, OH

#25043 Feb 5, 2014
mutt wrote:
<quoted text>
What, exactly, are the differences between "modern" man and Neanderthals? Take a look at this article:
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-humans-mor...
The opinions about so-called Neanderthals appear to be fabricated.
There's nothing in that article to support your last statement.
mutt wrote:
<quoted text>
And as for dating methods, those are completely unreliable. Here's an interesting article about dating:
http://www.examiner.com/article/radiometric-d...
Yeah, not from a scientific source at all, but from a "creationism examiner" Terry Hurlbut.

"A serious student of politics and political philosophy since his Yale (1980) days, Terry A. Hurlbut analyzes current political events from the perspective of some of the finest political theorists of the Western world, from Locke to Paine to Tocqueville to Rand."

I'm not impressed.
hgvdfghcfvbn nbgf

Cincinnati, OH

#25044 Feb 5, 2014
boo
mutt

Chillicothe, OH

#25045 Feb 5, 2014
Old Guy wrote:
Actually, modern birds are the last survivors of the dinosaur line. Science is uncertain of what killed the rest of the dinosaurs.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_birds
It's an assumption on the part of evolutionists that birds evolved from dinosaurs. Some scientists think that dinosaurs evolved from birds. Maybe neither thing happened. These scientists can't even decide whether "Longisquama insignis" had feathers or scales:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/103...

Dinosaurs are extinct.
I've already explained to you that some of the hominids did survive: 2 species of genus Pan, 2 species of genus Gorilla), 2 species of genus Pongo, and one species of genus Homo (humans). There was no catastrophic event that wiped out the others.
There are no transitional species alive between monkeys/apes and modern humans.
Reality Speaks

Columbus, OH

#25046 Feb 5, 2014
Pope Che Reagan Christ I wrote:
<quoted text>
You've been so boring the last couple days. Tell us more about how Obama had less votes in 2012 than McCain had in 2008 or something equally silly again. That's when you are fun.
have you found anyone desperate enough to date you yet?
Old Guy

Mason, OH

#25047 Feb 5, 2014
mutt wrote:
<quoted text>
There are no transitional species alive between monkeys/apes and modern humans.
True. But we know they did exist because of fossil and DNA evidence.

"Humans are primates. Physical and genetic similarities show that the modern human species, Homo sapiens, has a very close relationship to another group of primate species, the apes. Humans and the great apes (large apes) of Africa -- chimpanzees (including bonobos, or so-called “pygmy chimpanzees”) and gorillas -- share a common ancestor that lived between 8 and 6 million years ago. Humans first evolved in Africa, and much of human evolution occurred on that continent. The fossils of early humans who lived between 6 and 2 million years ago come entirely from Africa.

Most scientists currently recognize some 15 to 20 different species of early humans. Scientists do not all agree, however, about how these species are related or which ones simply died out. Many early human species -- certainly the majority of them – left no living descendants."

http://humanorigins.si.edu/resources/intro-hu...
mutt

Chillicothe, OH

#25048 Feb 5, 2014
Old Guy wrote:
There's nothing in that article to support your last statement.
I don't see any distinction between so-called "Neanderthals" and "modern" humans.
Yeah, not from a scientific source at all, but from a "creationism examiner" Terry Hurlbut.
Yes, I know how important "scientific sources" are to evolutionists.

Is this better? Same information, just a more palatable source:
https://www.sciencenews.org/article/java-man-...

"New age estimates for Homo erectus fossils on the Indonesian island of Java have physical anthropologists scratching their crania.

After convincing most of their colleagues that H. erectus may have persisted on the Indonesian island of Java as recently as 30,000 years ago — late enough to have coexisted in Asia with modern humans for more than 100,000 years — anthropologists presented new analyses April 14 suggesting the fossils in question may actually predate Homo sapiens by hundreds of thousands of years.

It all depends which radiometric method you use to assess the fossils’ age, New York University anthropologist Susan Antón reported at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists."
Pope Che Reagan Christ I

Medina, OH

#25049 Feb 5, 2014
Reality Speaks wrote:
<quoted text>
have you found anyone desperate enough to date you yet?
See what I mean? That's boring. Tell us about those election numbers.
mutt

Chillicothe, OH

#25050 Feb 5, 2014
Old Guy wrote:
True. But we know they did exist because of fossil and DNA evidence.....

Most scientists currently recognize some 15 to 20 different species of early humans. Scientists do not all agree, however, about how these species are related or which ones simply died out. Many early human species -- certainly the majority of them – left no living descendants."
http://humanorigins.si.edu/resources/intro-hu...
There has been DNA testing done on transitional species other than "Neanderthals"?

The fossil evidence is highly suspect. The reconstruction of a skull that's been smashed to 4 cm in height isn't real convincing.
Old Guy

Mason, OH

#25051 Feb 5, 2014
mutt wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't see any distinction between so-called "Neanderthals" and "modern" humans.
<quoted text>
"Krings et al. then compared this sequence against a database of 994 different mtDNA sequences from modern humans. For the sequence of mtDNA in question, humans on average differ from each other in 8 +/- 3.1 positions (the '3.1' represents one standard deviation). The greatest difference between any two modern humans was 24, and the smallest difference was 1 (because duplicates were removed from the database).

By contrast, the Neandertal genome had an average of 27 +/- 2.2 differences from modern humans (3.375 times the average difference between modern humans). The smallest difference between any human and the Neandertal was 22, and the largest difference between any human and the Neandertal was 36. These differences put the Neandertal genome well outside the limits of modern humans."

http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/homs/mtDNA.ht...
Reality Speaks

Columbus, OH

#25052 Feb 5, 2014
Pope Che Reagan Christ I wrote:
<quoted text>
See what I mean? That's boring. Tell us about those election numbers.
so you are still with the rubber doll then.

try putting a bag over your head....maybe that will help.

there has to be someone desperate enough to be with you.

check craigslist.....run a ad.
Pops

Fort Thomas, KY

#25053 Feb 5, 2014
mutt wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, there are extinct animals and plants. But like you said, every single dinosaur is gone, both large and small. Not just a few types. Was every single species incapable of surviving, or did something wipe them out?
Was every single species of hominid incapable of surviving, after having lived and multiplied for millions of years? Or was there also a catastrophic occurrence that wiped every one of them out, but miraculously avoided wiping out primates and modern man? I wonder what the odds of that would be.
It seems that you have hit on examples of how delicate nature can be.
I have been in awe of the balance of (among others) the desert bio-theme is. For example, most deserts have some life that has adapted to that extreme. Sparse vegetation, rocks & crannies that still harbor insects, arachnids, rodents, snakes & lizards that are all delicately & intricately interacting. With possibly an occasional roaming coyote or raptor in the mix.
IF a 2,3,4 or 5 yr weather change comes about, one species could excell while another diminishes. Just amazingly delicate, wonderfully balanced.
Then humankind comes along & stirs the mix dramatically.
Reality Speaks

Columbus, OH

#25054 Feb 5, 2014
Pops wrote:
<quoted text> It seems that you have hit on examples of how delicate nature can be.
I have been in awe of the balance of (among others) the desert bio-theme is. For example, most deserts have some life that has adapted to that extreme. Sparse vegetation, rocks & crannies that still harbor insects, arachnids, rodents, snakes & lizards that are all delicately & intricately interacting. With possibly an occasional roaming coyote or raptor in the mix.
IF a 2,3,4 or 5 yr weather change comes about, one species could excell while another diminishes. Just amazingly delicate, wonderfully balanced.
Then humankind comes along & stirs the mix dramatically.
think about a 17 year locust.

or frogs burrowed in the ground for years waiting for flood rains to mate. Timing for successful hatch and tadpole survival is critical.
Ham

Danville, OH

#25058 Feb 5, 2014
Pops wrote:
<quoted text> It seems that you have hit on examples of how delicate nature can be.
I have been in awe of the balance of (among others) the desert bio-theme is. For example, most deserts have some life that has adapted to that extreme. Sparse vegetation, rocks & crannies that still harbor insects, arachnids, rodents, snakes & lizards that are all delicately & intricately interacting. With possibly an occasional roaming coyote or raptor in the mix.
IF a 2,3,4 or 5 yr weather change comes about, one species could excell while another diminishes. Just amazingly delicate, wonderfully balanced.
Then humankind comes along & stirs the mix dramatically.
Newport pops wrote:
<quoted text>I know someone that says that Man has NOT colonized the moon because there are 'aliens' on the dark side that say that we (mankind) does NOT belong there. He & his wife also say that the contrails from jets are mind control agents being dispensed by the government. AND that since you can NOT disprove that, that makes it true. How can one argue with that 'thought' process?
mutt

Chillicothe, OH

#25061 Feb 5, 2014
Old Guy wrote:
"Krings et al. then compared this sequence against a database of 994 different mtDNA sequences from modern humans. For the sequence of mtDNA in question, humans on average differ from each other in 8 +/- 3.1 positions (the '3.1' represents one standard deviation). The greatest difference between any two modern humans was 24, and the smallest difference was 1 (because duplicates were removed from the database).
By contrast, the Neandertal genome had an average of 27 +/- 2.2 differences from modern humans (3.375 times the average difference between modern humans). The smallest difference between any human and the Neandertal was 22, and the largest difference between any human and the Neandertal was 36. These differences put the Neandertal genome well outside the limits of modern humans."
http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/homs/mtDNA.ht...
I was surprised that DNA had been extracted from fossils, and very skeptical of the quality of it. It turns out that it is, indeed, very difficult to extract the DNA, and what has been gathered is poor quality. Another concern is modern-human DNA contamination. Even a small amount mixed in with the "Neanderthal's" will skew the results.
Look at this govt website, and in particular, the section about "Authenticity".
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2...
Pops

Fort Thomas, KY

#25062 Feb 5, 2014
Reality Speaks wrote:
<quoted text>
think about a 17 year locust.
or frogs burrowed in the ground for years waiting for flood rains to mate. Timing for successful hatch and tadpole survival is critical.
I did think of those but simply didn't expound. All the more amazing. From the Namibian Desert of beetles & snakes to the penquins of Antartica. Mountain sheep & goats of elevated regions to the Sloths & Anaconda of the tropics to the migration of Wildabeast of Africa, Monarch Butterflies & so many more . ALL a delicate balance of nature.
I am still in awe. Absolutely amazing!! And absolutely delicate.
Pops

Fort Thomas, KY

#25064 Feb 5, 2014
Ham wrote:
<quoted text>Newport pops wrote:
<quoted text>I know someone that says that Man has NOT colonized the moon because there are 'aliens' on the dark side that say that we (mankind) does NOT belong there. He & his wife also say that the contrails from jets are mind control agents being dispensed by the government. AND that since you can NOT disprove that, that makes it true. How can one argue with that 'thought' process?
Copying & pasting this means what? NOTHING at all to the subject thread that YOU put it in.
Please contribute instead of simply adding BS to the thread. Unless that is the best that 'ham/pork' can articulate What the heck is your point....IF you have one?
Your lack of intellect is clearly showing .
mutt

Chillicothe, OH

#25065 Feb 5, 2014
Pops wrote:
It seems that you have hit on examples of how delicate nature can be.
I have been in awe of the balance of (among others) the desert bio-theme is. For example, most deserts have some life that has adapted to that extreme. Sparse vegetation, rocks & crannies that still harbor insects, arachnids, rodents, snakes & lizards that are all delicately & intricately interacting. With possibly an occasional roaming coyote or raptor in the mix.
IF a 2,3,4 or 5 yr weather change comes about, one species could excell while another diminishes. Just amazingly delicate, wonderfully balanced.
Then humankind comes along & stirs the mix dramatically.
It is amazing how life can thrive in such extreme places. It's a wonder, to be sure.
mutt

Chillicothe, OH

#25066 Feb 5, 2014
Has anyone watched the debate between Bill Nye & Ken Ham? Both Nye and Ham did a very good job. Really interesting, the different viewpoints.

I was surprised by the answers to the last question, or rather by the implications in the answers. The question was: "What is the one thing, more than anything else, on which you base your belief?" I won't try to explain each of the answers, because I wouldn't do them justice, but I was left with the sobering reminder that life and the pursuit of science without God is profoundly meaningless.

You can watch the debate here:
http://debatelive.org/...

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