Southern Vermont residents prepare fo...

Southern Vermont residents prepare for life after Vt. Yankee

There are 53 comments on the WCAX-TV Burlington story from Sep 18, 2013, titled Southern Vermont residents prepare for life after Vt. Yankee. In it, WCAX-TV Burlington reports that:

Entergy officials announced last month that they will be closing the plant in the fourth quarter of next year.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at WCAX-TV Burlington.

Goodbye Entergy

Rindge, NH

#21 Sep 23, 2013
I Know More Than You wrote:
<quoted text>
Maybe you should switch to decaffeinated...
Okay Entergy Troll...you just proved who the moron is. Not even a clever repartee. Not much to really say for you. You don't know much but this much I do know. There are three kinds of turds...musturd, custurd, and you, you big poo poo.
Alex

Newton Center, MA

#22 Sep 23, 2013
"Southern Vermont residents prepare for life after Vt. Yankee"

-and across the pond in Japan they are preparing for Death after Fukushima Daiichi

so far half the kids from Fukushima have thyroid problems which is generally considered as stage one cancer
---
400% Spike In Health Problems In Fukushima Workers
http://enenews.com/tv-govt-reports-large-spik...
---
Did Fukushima Release 210 Quadrillion Bq Of Cesium-137?
http://enenews.com/eu-funded-research-fukushi...
---

Daiichi Contamination May Be 1,000% Higher Than Said
http://enenews.com/experts-fukushima-contamin...

Top Scientist - Fukushima Ice Wall Will Make Crisis Far Worse
http://enenews.com/senior-scientist-fukushima...
==

Ohio Nuke Plant Reactor Building Cracks Are Spreading
http://enenews.com/cracks-discovered-in-u-s-n...
---

U.S. West Coast To Be Hit By Daiichi Radiation For Decades - Model
http://enenews.com/study-high-concentrations-...
Goodbye Entergy

Rindge, NH

#23 Sep 23, 2013
Long Islander Skier wrote:
Downtown Brattleboro is a freak show, it will only get worse when Vermont Yankee shuts down.
I suggest you immediately contact the Entergy Administration in either Louisiana or Arkansas and tell them not to close down VY because downtown Brattleboro is a freak show and will only get worse. I am sure they will address your concerns and make assurances that they will keep the plant open to assuage the fears of Long Island Skiers.
Goodbye Entergy

Rindge, NH

#24 Sep 23, 2013
Free 4 me wrote:
<quoted text> Payroll will take a significant cut, tax value of the plant will be adjusted, home and property values will sink, school enrollment will decline requiring staff to be cut, are just a few of the immediate impacts. You aren't helping anyone by pretending it doesn't matter. We have one year to get our collective heads out of our asses. Chit tender county could absorb this impact, but Windham is too heavily dependant on too thin of an economic base.
WOW! Who knew? I am certain that if you just let Entergy know all these bad things that are going to happen, they will reopen the plant for you and run it at a loss so you can get your head out of your ass.
Goodbye Entergy

Rindge, NH

#25 Sep 23, 2013
Free 4 me wrote:
Vermont state average of students enrolled in Free and Reduced Lunch is around 43% while Windham County is around 55%.
Yeah, you're right. Entergy can change all that by keeping VY open.
Goodbye Entergy

Rindge, NH

#26 Sep 24, 2013
'during a press conference at Entergy headquarters on Old Ferry Road in Brattleboro, Bill Mohl, president of Entergy Wholesale Commodities said after several months of analysis and discussion, Entergy's board of directors had reached the conclusion that Yankee's continued operation was no longer financially viable.
The primary reason for its closure, said Mohl, was the reduced cost of natural gas due to innovations in hydraulic fracturing.'
Gee whiz. And I thought it was my fault they were shutting up shop. Don't they know that Brattleboro will lose it's middle class? Don't they know the Long Island Skiers are afraid downtown Bratt will get more freakier? Don't they know property values will go down? Don't they know that the tax base will be askew? Don't they know what happened in Maine when WRC closed down? It is time to get our heads out of our collective asses my fellow citizens. We need to have a massive protest demonstration and force them to STAY OPEN! If they only knew how awful things are going to be without them, I am confident they will change their decision.
Good luck with that

West Rutland, VT

#27 Sep 24, 2013
wcax.com

US-Canada pipeline ponders move after Vt. ruling

Gas leak in ST Albans
I Know More Than You

Topsham, ME

#28 Sep 24, 2013
I am an idiot wrote:
Yada yada yada...That' what they said when Estey Organ Company went out and that's what they said was going to happen when the horseless carriages took over..so it was goodbye to organ makers and goodbye to horsetraders, blacksmiths, wagon makers, wheelwrights, stable muckers, saddleries, and all the other occupations that have become obsolete. And now it is an obsolete nuclear power plant and its attending occupations that move on. What's the alternative? Not even Entergy wants that crumbling non profitable piece of junk anymore. It's their business plan and their decision. So who are you blaming then? The no nuke people, the people who see the clear and present dangers, or Entergy? They clearly don't have their heads up their asses and are going to cut their losses and vacate.
No one is blaming anyone and the workers who are no longer going to be working at Vermont Yankee will be taking their 6 figure incomes somewhere else making your attempted analogy so wrong as to be laughable.

Maybe you live far enough away so the economic impacts won't be as severe but to bury your head up your ass and pretend the economic impacts are some sort of threat only shows your ignorance.
Goodbye Entergy

Rindge, NH

#29 Sep 25, 2013
I Know More Than You wrote:
<quoted text>
No one is blaming anyone and the workers who are no longer going to be working at Vermont Yankee will be taking their 6 figure incomes somewhere else making your attempted analogy so wrong as to be laughable.
Maybe you live far enough away so the economic impacts won't be as severe but to bury your head up your ass and pretend the economic impacts are some sort of threat only shows your ignorance.
And the six figure incomes involved in decommissioning will be here for years. Won't you be surprised when life goes on. Maybe you own one of those useless doodad la la stores in town. Get over it you big poo poo.
Alex

Newton Center, MA

#30 Sep 25, 2013
"...will be taking their 6 figure incomes somewhere else..."

-the part about taking their G-d nukescum asses somewhere else makes any downturn in the SE Vermont economy sound quite bearable for this SE Vermonter thank ewe!

Oh but of course like the dirtbags they are they sh't and walk away, leaving the radtastic waste on site along with a big future unpaid bill for taking care of it
Good luck with that

West Rutland, VT

#31 Sep 25, 2013
The New England power grid operator, ISO New England, expects greenhouse gas emissions and wholesale energy prices to rise as a result of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant’s closing in late 2014.

The energy market can spike or dip quickly, and a range of variables can affect energy prices and sources. But if the market remains relatively steady, ISO representatives project that Vermont Yankee’s closure would have a noticeable impact on the region.

ISO’s projected increases are tied to its method for organizing energy bids, called “bid stack.” ISO organizes bids from power generators across New England in bid stack from low to high, or cheap to expensive.

Lower energy bids sell first from the stack, and more expensive sources of power come online as they are needed. Removing Vermont Yankee from the stack means that the bids would shift down, and more expensive generators would fill the roughly 600-megawatt void left by Vermont Yankee.

Stephen Rourke, vice president of system planning for ISO, said this movement would inflate the price of power in the market above what it would have been with Vermont Yankee in the mix.......
Vtdigger.org
Bad Luck With Nukes

Newton Center, MA

#32 Sep 25, 2013
Nuclear Experts: Fukushima Unit 4 has shown signs of collapsing
http://enenews.com/nuclear-experts-fukushima-...
--

besides the high cost of nukedom regarding megadeaths which nukescum ignore, there's the Other co$ts which hurt their bottom line, such as the fuel becoming scarce...

Uranium diet: US nuclear power industry could face fuel shortage
Russia has been supplying US nuclear power plants with fuel for a dumping price since 1995. But with the HEU-LEU agreement coming to an end, America’s nuclear power generation industry is likely to face a sharp fuel price surge and shortage.
http://rt.com/op-edge/russia-usa-nuclear-powe...
Goodbye Entergy

Rindge, NH

#33 Sep 25, 2013
Good luck with that wrote:
The New England power grid operator, ISO New England, expects greenhouse gas emissions and wholesale energy prices to rise as a result of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant’s closing in late 2014.
The energy market can spike or dip quickly, and a range of variables can affect energy prices and sources. But if the market remains relatively steady, ISO representatives project that Vermont Yankee’s closure would have a noticeable impact on the region.
ISO’s projected increases are tied to its method for organizing energy bids, called “bid stack.” ISO organizes bids from power generators across New England in bid stack from low to high, or cheap to expensive.
Lower energy bids sell first from the stack, and more expensive sources of power come online as they are needed. Removing Vermont Yankee from the stack means that the bids would shift down, and more expensive generators would fill the roughly 600-megawatt void left by Vermont Yankee.
Stephen Rourke, vice president of system planning for ISO, said this movement would inflate the price of power in the market above what it would have been with Vermont Yankee in the mix.......
Vtdigger.org
Guess this means I have to get rid of my big flat screen TV and start hanging the wash out to dry. Damn. Curses on you Entergy.
Goodbye Entergy

Rindge, NH

#34 Sep 25, 2013
Bad Luck With Nukes wrote:
Nuclear Experts: Fukushima Unit 4 has shown signs of collapsing
http://enenews.com/nuclear-experts-fukushima-...
--
besides the high cost of nukedom regarding megadeaths which nukescum ignore, there's the Other co$ts which hurt their bottom line, such as the fuel becoming scarce...
Uranium diet: US nuclear power industry could face fuel shortage
Russia has been supplying US nuclear power plants with fuel for a dumping price since 1995. But with the HEU-LEU agreement coming to an end, America’s nuclear power generation industry is likely to face a sharp fuel price surge and shortage.
http://rt.com/op-edge/russia-usa-nuclear-powe...
Of course, Entergy has included all this in the equation. More reasons why they are exiting.
Negative Growth

West Rutland, VT

#35 Sep 26, 2013
http://vtdigger.org/2013/09/24/energy-prices-...
Willem Post
September 24, 2013 at 10:51 pm
I fully agree with the ISO-NE analysis regarding rising energy prices and increased New England use of coal and gas energy.
The ISO-NE professionals who operate the grid know the ins and outs of scheduling generating units to serve the demand, unlike Shumlin’s political DPS appointees, who usually kow-tow the RE line, hell or high water.
A major LOW COST, NEAR-ZERO CO2-EMITTING producer is closing its plant, and Recchia is going to replace that energy with SPEED RE at 3-4 times grid prices and Lowell Mountain wind RE at 15-20 c/kWh?
GMP had estimated Lowell wind energy at about 10 c/kWh, but because of much greater than estimated capital costs, greater than estimated ridge line O&M costs, and lower than estimated capacity factors due to a lack of wind, even on ridge lines, and likely future curtailments due to grid limitations and excessive noise, the Lowell wind energy will be 15-20 c/kWh.
Ricchia must know, Vermont already has the 4th highest electricity costs, right after Alaska, Hawaii, and Connecticut, per EIA, largely due to inanely-conceived RE programs benefitting well-connected, multi-millionaires (crony-capitalism) and hurting all others.
Vermont Yankee production: 620 MW x 8760 x 0.9 = 4,888,000 MWh/yr
New England wind energy production: 700 MW x 8760 x 0.24 = 1,471,680 MWh/yr
One would need 3.3 x 700 = 2325 MW of wind turbines to match VY’s output, i.e., add 1610 MW at a cost of $4,025 billion, PLUS the costs of wind energy balancing, PLUS the costs of grid connection, reinforcement and extension, PLUS the costs back-up (adequacy), i.e., keeping almost all EXISTING generators fueled, staffed, in good working order to provide energy when wind energy is minimal, about 30% of the hours of the year in NE, about 10-15% of the hours of the year west of Chicago.
In the US, the cost of the 3 PLUSSES for onshore IWTs is about $16.30/MWh at 10% annual wind energy on the grid, about 19.84/MWh at 30%. This is significantly greater than the about $5/MWh usually mentioned by IWT proponents. See page 8 of this URL. Corresponding costs for offshore wind turbine plants would be greater.
http://www.oecd-nea.org/ndd/reports/2012/syst...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cost_of_electric...
Negative Growth

West Rutland, VT

#36 Sep 26, 2013
http://vtdigger.org/2013/09/24/energy-prices-...

guy page

September 25, 2013 at 11:08 am

Here are some reasons why I foresee a VY-closure related increase, now and/or in the near-future, in the cost of electricity:

1) VY was (speaking in past tense for planning purposes) a “first dispatch” producer for grid operators. Because it ran at full power virtually all of the time (except during outages), and had a stable production cost, AND was a “voltage regulator” for the transmission grid, it was a “go to” producer.

In other words, it was a grid all-star. When Red Sox manager John Farrell was told he was losing 10-0 pitcher Clay Buchholz earlier this season, he did not tell reporters “gosh, this is really going to hurt.” Instead he emphasized the positive – we have an abundance pitchers, we planned for this contingency, etc. But the fact is that until they picked up Jake Peavy a couple of months later, the Sox were struggling to fill Bucholz’s slot with a series of unprepared rookies and retread veterans. The team’s overall performance suffered. The point is that grid manager ISO, like Sox manager Farrell, had to play the cards he was dealt. So does ISO – hence the “costs will go up” remark. It remains to be seen if ISO will “perform” as well without its all-star.

2) Furthermore, Vermont utilities are in a terribly weak negotiating position for longterm power contracts. When a big hydro or gas producer says “here’s the price, take it or leave it” they have nowhere to turn, and the sellers know it. The market has Vermont power buyers over a barrel, because there are fewer places to turn.

VY is Vermont’s ONE 500+ MW, stable-priced, reliable, licensed, instate power producer. When such a potentially valuable resource like VY goes out of business, the ratepayer will suffer.

From the ratepayer’s point of view, it is sad that within weeks of VY’s closure, Gov. Shumlin announced with great fanfare the proposed construction of five megawatts of solar power on a number of state facilities, including the Pavilion building in Montpelier. I say sad because I have it from a senior state official that this price will cost ratepayers 20 cents per kilowatt hour. The VY contract was for four cents; the current market price is about four cents; and here is our Vermont State Government virtually “branding” itself as the implacable foe of a grid all-star, and the highly-visible proponent of 20 cent power.

At present, Vermont ratepayers are somewhat insulated by cheap gas from the longterm high-cost consequences of downplaying the importance of the wholesale cost of electricity. Yet gas is a commodity, and the one constant in the commodity market is that it fluctuates. It is subject to market forces like supply demand increases, transmission bottlenecks and export-inviting high gas costs in Europe.

State government is powerful but it cannot defy national and international market forces, much less the possible intervention of various potential kinds of federal, carbon-related regulation. I am concerned that our state’s energy policy may paint us into a high-cost, unreliable corner.

3) Vermont Yankee has been a fruitful source of renewable power funding, through the Vermont Clean Energy Development Fund and its beneficial impact on Vermont’s RGGI status. Already, the Legislature is grappling (so far without great success) with finding alternative funding for efficiency, public renewable improvements, etc. The New Reality is that the Vermont Yankee revenue source is drying up, quite dramatically so.
Goodbye Entergy

Rindge, NH

#37 Sep 26, 2013
Negative Growth wrote:
http://vtdigger.org/2013/09/24/energy-prices-...
guy page
September 25, 2013 at 11:08 am
Here are some reasons why I foresee a VY-closure related increase, now and/or in the near-future, in the cost of electricity:
1) VY was (speaking in past tense for planning purposes) a “first dispatch” producer for grid operators. Because it ran at full power virtually all of the time (except during outages), and had a stable production cost, AND was a “voltage regulator” for the transmission grid, it was a “go to” producer.
In other words, it was a grid all-star. When Red Sox manager John Farrell was told he was losing 10-0 pitcher Clay Buchholz earlier this season, he did not tell reporters “gosh, this is really going to hurt.” Instead he emphasized the positive – we have an abundance pitchers, we planned for this contingency, etc. But the fact is that until they picked up Jake Peavy a couple of months later, the Sox were struggling to fill Bucholz’s slot with a series of unprepared rookies and retread veterans. The team’s overall performance suffered. The point is that grid manager ISO, like Sox manager Farrell, had to play the cards he was dealt. So does ISO – hence the “costs will go up” remark. It remains to be seen if ISO will “perform” as well without its all-star.
2) Furthermore, Vermont utilities are in a terribly weak negotiating position for longterm power contracts. When a big hydro or gas producer says “here’s the price, take it or leave it” they have nowhere to turn, and the sellers know it. The market has Vermont power buyers over a barrel, because there are fewer places to turn.
VY is Vermont’s ONE 500+ MW, stable-priced, reliable, licensed, instate power producer. When such a potentially valuable resource like VY goes out of business, the ratepayer will suffer.
From the ratepayer’s point of view, it is sad that within weeks of VY’s closure, Gov. Shumlin announced with great fanfare the proposed construction of five megawatts of solar power on a number of state facilities, including the Pavilion building in Montpelier. I say sad because I have it from a senior state official that this price will cost ratepayers 20 cents per kilowatt hour. The VY contract was for four cents; the current market price is about four cents; and here is our Vermont State Government virtually “branding” itself as the implacable foe of a grid all-star, and the highly-visible proponent of 20 cent power.
At present, Vermont ratepayers are somewhat insulated by cheap gas from the longterm high-cost consequences of downplaying the importance of the wholesale cost of electricity. Yet gas is a commodity, and the one constant in the commodity market is that it fluctuates. It is subject to market forces like supply demand increases, transmission bottlenecks and export-inviting high gas costs in Europe.
State government is powerful but it cannot defy national and international market forces, much less the possible intervention of various potential kinds of federal, carbon-related regulation. I am concerned that our state’s energy policy may paint us into a high-cost, unreliable corner.
3) Vermont Yankee has been a fruitful source of renewable power funding, through the Vermont Clean Energy Development Fund and its beneficial impact on Vermont’s RGGI status. Already, the Legislature is grappling (so far without great success) with finding alternative funding for efficiency, public renewable improvements, etc. The New Reality is that the Vermont Yankee revenue source is drying up, quite dramatically so.
Damn,,,it DOES look like I will have to get rid of my big flat screen TV and hang the wash out to dry! I am so afraid now. Please VY....don' t leave us. Guess I just didn't understand because I missed that course in graduate school about baseball and nuclear power, and something about playing cards with the Red Sox.
Goodbye Entergy

Rindge, NH

#38 Sep 26, 2013
Negative Growth wrote:
http://vtdigger.org/2013/09/24/energy-prices-...
guy page
September 25, 2013 at 11:08 am
Here are some reasons why I foresee a VY-closure related increase, now and/or in the near-future, in the cost of electricity:
1) VY was (speaking in past tense for planning purposes) a “first dispatch” producer for grid operators. Because it ran at full power virtually all of the time (except during outages), and had a stable production cost, AND was a “voltage regulator” for the transmission grid, it was a “go to” producer.
In other words, it was a grid all-star. When Red Sox manager John Farrell was told he was losing 10-0 pitcher Clay Buchholz earlier this season, he did not tell reporters “gosh, this is really going to hurt.” Instead he emphasized the positive – we have an abundance pitchers, we planned for this contingency, etc. But the fact is that until they picked up Jake Peavy a couple of months later, the Sox were struggling to fill Bucholz’s slot with a series of unprepared rookies and retread veterans. The team’s overall performance suffered. The point is that grid manager ISO, like Sox manager Farrell, had to play the cards he was dealt. So does ISO – hence the “costs will go up” remark. It remains to be seen if ISO will “perform” as well without its all-star.
2) Furthermore, Vermont utilities are in a terribly weak negotiating position for longterm power contracts. When a big hydro or gas producer says “here’s the price, take it or leave it” they have nowhere to turn, and the sellers know it. The market has Vermont power buyers over a barrel, because there are fewer places to turn.
VY is Vermont’s ONE 500+ MW, stable-priced, reliable, licensed, instate power producer. When such a potentially valuable resource like VY goes out of business, the ratepayer will suffer.
From the ratepayer’s point of view, it is sad that within weeks of VY’s closure, Gov. Shumlin announced with great fanfare the proposed construction of five megawatts of solar power on a number of state facilities, including the Pavilion building in Montpelier. I say sad because I have it from a senior state official that this price will cost ratepayers 20 cents per kilowatt hour. The VY contract was for four cents; the current market price is about four cents; and here is our Vermont State Government virtually “branding” itself as the implacable foe of a grid all-star, and the highly-visible proponent of 20 cent power.
At present, Vermont ratepayers are somewhat insulated by cheap gas from the longterm high-cost consequences of downplaying the importance of the wholesale cost of electricity. Yet gas is a commodity, and the one constant in the commodity market is that it fluctuates. It is subject to market forces like supply demand increases, transmission bottlenecks and export-inviting high gas costs in Europe.
State government is powerful but it cannot defy national and international market forces, much less the possible intervention of various potential kinds of federal, carbon-related regulation. I am concerned that our state’s energy policy may paint us into a high-cost, unreliable corner.
3) Vermont Yankee has been a fruitful source of renewable power funding, through the Vermont Clean Energy Development Fund and its beneficial impact on Vermont’s RGGI status. Already, the Legislature is grappling (so far without great success) with finding alternative funding for efficiency, public renewable improvements, etc. The New Reality is that the Vermont Yankee revenue source is drying up, quite dramatically so.
Damn...guess I will have to get rid of my big flat screen TV and hang the wash out to dry.
Negative Growth

West Rutland, VT

#39 Sep 26, 2013
Goodbye Entergy wrote:
<quoted text>
Damn...guess I will have to get rid of my big flat screen TV and hang the wash out to dry.
And your place of employment? The schools in your district? The grocery store and resturants? Local Hospitals and health clinics? How about anchor businesses like C&S Wholesale Grocers that help to reduce your everyday costs by paying what I like to call "anchor taxes"? Your library and place of worship, our farmers....

What about their increase in energy cost?
Negative Growth

West Rutland, VT

#40 Sep 26, 2013
Kewaunee Nuclear Plant Layoffs Begin as Dominion Releases Job-Cut Schedule

http://nuclearstreet.com/nuclear_power_indust...

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