A Christian Plot for Domination

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Brockton, MA

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Aug 18, 2011
 

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A Christian Plot for Domination?
Aug 14, 2011 10:51 PM EDT
Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry aren't just devout—both have deep ties to a fringe fundamentalist movement known as Dominionism, which says Christians should rule the world.

..."For believers in Dominionism, rule by non-Christians is a sort of sacrilege—which explains, in part, the theological fury that has accompanied the election of our last two Democratic presidents.“Christians have an obligation, a mandate, a commission, a holy responsibility to reclaim the land for Jesus Christ—to have dominion in civil structures, just as in every other aspect of life and godliness,” wrote George Grant, the former executive director of Coral Ridge Ministries, which has since changed its name to Truth in Action Ministries.“But it is dominion we are after. Not just a voice ... It is dominion we are after. Not just equal time ... World conquest.”

Bachmann is close to Truth in Action Ministries; last year, she appeared in one of its documentaries, Socialism: A Clear and Present Danger. In it, she espoused the idea, common in Reconstructionist circles, that the government has no right to collect taxes in excess of 10 percent, the amount that believers are called to tithe to the church. On her state-senate-campaign website, she recommended a book co-authored by Grant titled Call of Duty: The Sterling Nobility of Robert E. Lee, which, as Lizza reported, depicted the civil war as a battle between the devout Christian South and the Godless North, and lauded slavery as a benevolent institution.“The unity and companionship that existed between the races in the South prior to the war was the fruit of a common faith,” the book said."...

..."We have not seen this sort of thing at the highest levels of the Republican Party before. Those of us who wrote about the Christian fundamentalist influence on the Bush administration were alarmed that one of his advisers, Marvin Olasky, was associated with Christian Reconstructionism. It seemed unthinkable, at the time, that an American president was taking advice from even a single person whose ideas were so inimical to democracy. Few of us imagined that someone who actually championed such ideas would have a shot at the White House. It turns out we weren’t paranoid enough. If Bush eroded the separation of church and state, the GOP is now poised to nominate someone who will mount an all-out assault on it. We need to take their beliefs seriously, because they certainly do."
Gott mit uns

Brockton, MA

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#2
Aug 18, 2011
 
Mike Mulligan

Boston, MA

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#3
Aug 18, 2011
 

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That is a good educational article...

Are the right stemming off a so called god part of their brains... can you stem together?

Is it misguided true beliefs?

Are they fake stylistic beliefs and language intending on self interest...

Stemming refers to a brain damaged person...vegetable...all of the brain is destroyed and what you see from the person is nothing but brain stem activity....

Since: Dec 10

Ron Paul 2012

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Aug 18, 2011
 

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This is the same stuff you accuse others of having tin-foil on their heads for, yet you are eating this stuff up. IT'S THE SAME STUFF just in different context.
Mike Mulligan

Boston, MA

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#5
Aug 18, 2011
 
I get it, that is what you believe....

At the end of the day, it what everyone else believes...
Gott mit uns

Brockton, MA

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#6
Aug 18, 2011
 

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A Bachmann Staffer’s Dominionist Worldview, Gun-Running Charges, and Ties To Ugandan “Kill-The-Gays” Pastor
Jim Burroway
August 17th, 2011

"A close associate of Rep. Michele Bachmann who believes that the Congresswoman is fighting for the presidency with “the anointing of God upon her,” has come under scrutiny for his 2006 arrest in Uganda on gun-running charges, and for his close relationship with Ugandan pentecostal pastor Martin Ssempa, a prominent advocate for that nation’s “Kill the Gays” Bill.

Peter E. Waldron, the staffer for Rep. Michele Bachmann’s presidential campaign responsible for her faith-based outreach in Iowa and South Carolina, had been arrested in Uganda in 2006 on charges of running illegal guns and ammunition. Garance Franke-Ruta’s profile at The Atlantic resurrected the details. He had been arrested for possession of assault rifles and ammunition just days before Uganda’s first nominally multi-party elections in 20 years. The charges were dropped after Waldron spent more than a month in 2006 in the notorious Luriza Prison outside of Kampala. He was freed, he says, after pressure from the Bush administration. Of course, when it comes to Ugandan police work, the charges should be seen with some measure of skepticism, although newspaper reports (via archive.org ) in Kampala at the time are quite detailed. Waldron himself isn’t helpful in clearing up matters. On the one hand, he says that Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni operates death squads, and then calls Uganda’s leadership born-again Christians and good friends."...

..."Richard Bartholomew also pointed to this 36-page document (via archive.org ) which had been stored on Waldron’s web site and was dated 2004, explaining the guiding theology of Waldron’s Cities of Faith Ministries. Waldron’s theology mirrors that of the father of Christian Reconstructionism, R.J. Rushdooney, whom Waldron quoted in one passage. In the introduction, Walrdon wrote:

For generations Christians have wrongly divided all the affairs of their lives into secular matters and spiritual matters. Many of those secular-spiritual divisions and classifications are artificial divisions and heretical in its origins based on humanist philosophy rather than the historic Biblical teachings of the Church.

The modern Evangelical Christian is often a person who has made one’s life a huge set of pigeon holes in which every matter is classified as secular or spiritual. This obvious double-mindedness prevents the blessings of God to overtake one’s testimony – in the spirit, the soul, the body, and/or one’s material possessions.

The whole life of a Christian is spiritual, and everything he does which involves conduct, attitude or one’s role in society or, even, relationships has spiritual significance.

Waldron wrote that “the history of liberty is the history of Christian self-government”— and not just self-government in the sense that all individuals govern the course of their lives through the choices they make. No, Waldron’s concept of self-government is much broader:

A totalitarian form of governance arises when the Word of God is compromised, ignored or denied. A person will self-destruct from abuse of spirit, soul and body. A nation will collapse under a “hard” or “soft” form of dictatorship, abuse of public or elected office, and a general denial of human freedom – life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness – arises. The source of one’s belief system dictates the conduct whether it be personal or national. The same goes for the end result.

The Bible represents the absolute source for the guiding principles and precepts for all governments in man (self-government), of families (family government), churches (church government), and for nations (civil government)."...
Alex

Vernon, VT

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#7
Aug 18, 2011
 

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Bachmann was an IRS lawyer- nuff said. Talk about 'donmination'!
http://assassinbug.files.wordpress.com/2011/0...
or perhaps you'd prefer a democrat woman as prez?
http://current.com/1ect64c http://tizona.files.wordpress.com/2008/02/hit...
Gott mit uns

Brockton, MA

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Aug 19, 2011
 

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Right-Wing Group Using Perry's 'Response' List for Christian Voter Mobilization

by: Katherine Haenschen
Thu Aug 18, 2011 at 02:04 PM CDT
http://www.burntorangereport.com/diary/11303/...

"This afternoon, right-wing religious organization The American Family Association, one of the co-sponsors of Rick Perry's Totally Not Political Prayer Event, sent a message to The Response's email list in an early effort to begin registering and mobilizing 5 million conservative Christians to vote in the upcoming election.

AFA was one of the most visible and extreme participants in Perry's Response rally at Reliant earlier this month. They oppose religious tolerance at all turns, and have a record of attacking a wide variety of non-Christians for their faiths. Southern Poverty Law Center named AFA a Hate Group in 2010, and Right Wing Watch also keeps tabs on them too.

American Family Association's publicly stated issue positions run the gamut of far-right and conservative points of view -- AFA opposes same sex marriage, abortion, and organized labor, and support deregulation of the oil industry. AFA opposes funding for the National Endowment of the Arts, and supports a quarantine for AIDS victims. They blamed Virginia Tech on insufficient prayer in schools and premarital sex. And AFA wraps it all up by pin-pointing the degradation of our society on obscene TV content, which they specifically blame on -- wait for it -- "the media being controlled by the Jews."

Very Jesus like! Except not really.

The email makes clear that the goal of AFA is to use The Response list to mobilize right-wing Christian voters -- probable Perry supporters -- in the upcoming election cycle. From the email, emphasis mine:

Today, I want to introduce you to Champion the Vote (CTV), a friend of AFA whose mission is to mobilize 5 million unregistered conservative Christians to register and vote according to the Biblical worldview in 2012. Only half of the Christians in the United States are registered to vote. Imagine the impact we could make on the future of America if these Christians made their voices heard in the voting booth!

Imagine the impact, indeed -- women's choice, eradicated! Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, gone! The EPA, "prayed" away at long last. Religious freedom and separation of church and state, suddenly a relic. America would be plunged into a kind of dystopian nightmare that Glenn Beck even hesitates to dream of.

But wait! Rick Perry said The Response wasn't political! The website even says it:

The Response is a non-denominational, apolitical Christian prayer meeting and has adopted the American Family Association statement of faith.

In his remarks at The Response, Rick Perry said of God, "His agenda isn't a political agenda. It's a salvation agenda." Evidently Perry's own political salvation comes in the form of 5 million right-wing Christians voting to instate their extremely narrow view of a theocratic Christian America.

The email was clearly sent to The Response list. In the footer, the copy of the email received by Burnt Orange Report stated as follows:

This e-mail message was sent to [redacted].[Redacted] signed up to receive e-mail from The Response.

Make no mistake about it. Right-wing groups affiliated with Rick Perry are already organizing archly conservative religious voters for the 2012 election, and using the infrastructure provided by The Response to do it. That email went to everyone who RSVP'ed for the event, hosted a satellite house party, or an event in their own local community of faith. The Response was a tremendous grassroots organizing tool to begin infiltrating affinity groups of faith in preparation for Rick Perry's run for President, which today's message from the American Family Association to The Response email list makes abundantly clear."
Gott mit uns

Brockton, MA

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#9
Aug 19, 2011
 

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"The full email, forwarded to BOR:

Thank you for registering for The Response on August 6 in Houston. I hope you were able to attend or participate online as it was certainly a day to remember. I was especially encouraged to see so many youth and young adults in attendance. In addition to the tens of thousands who were in attendance at Reliant Stadium, over 2,000 churches and groups gathered together and joined the event via a live web stream, and hundreds of thousands participated via a live web stream from their homes. If you were not able to participate live, we encourage you to watch the video archives of The Response that will be available at the website ( http://www.theresponseusa.com ) until the end of August.

The Response was just the beginning of a nationwide initiative to return America to the principles on which she was founded, with God at the center of our nation. All of us in attendance in Houston were moved by the overwhelming call to repentance, prayer and action.

Today, I want to introduce you to Champion the Vote (CTV), a friend of AFA whose mission is to mobilize 5 million unregistered conservative Christians to register and vote according to the Biblical worldview in 2012. Only half of the Christians in the United States are registered to vote. Imagine the impact we could make on the future of America if these Christians made their voices heard in the voting booth!

CTV's research has shown that it takes only 5 million voters to influence the outcome of an election. This is a do-able goal, and Champion the Vote is seeking Champions - an army of volunteers -- to help with the effort. A Champion is simply a Christian talking to other Christians about registering and voting.

If you would like to be involved in this important initiative, go to the CTV website ( http://www.ChampionTheVote.com ) for complete details. We can make a difference, one by one, multiplied across the nation.

Sincerely,

Don Wildmon, Founder
American Family Association

P.S. Our leaders need your prayers. Here are two easy ways to pray daily for our leaders - http://www.PrayForLeaders.com . "
Gott mit uns

Brockton, MA

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#10
Aug 19, 2011
 

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Right-Wing Group Using Perry's 'Response' List for Christian Voter Mobilization

by: Katherine Haenschen
Thu Aug 18, 2011 at 02:04 PM CDT
http://www.burntorangereport.com/diary/11303/...

"This afternoon, right-wing religious organization The American Family Association, one of the co-sponsors of Rick Perry's Totally Not Political Prayer Event, sent a message to The Response's email list in an early effort to begin registering and mobilizing 5 million conservative Christians to vote in the upcoming election.

AFA was one of the most visible and extreme participants in Perry's Response rally at Reliant earlier this month. They oppose religious tolerance at all turns, and have a record of attacking a wide variety of non-Christians for their faiths. Southern Poverty Law Center named AFA a Hate Group in 2010, and Right Wing Watch also keeps tabs on them too.

American Family Association's publicly stated issue positions run the gamut of far-right and conservative points of view -- AFA opposes same sex marriage, abortion, and organized labor, and support deregulation of the oil industry. AFA opposes funding for the National Endowment of the Arts, and supports a quarantine for AIDS victims. They blamed Virginia Tech on insufficient prayer in schools and premarital sex. And AFA wraps it all up by pin-pointing the degradation of our society on obscene TV content, which they specifically blame on -- wait for it -- "the media being controlled by the Jews."

Very Jesus like! Except not really.

The email makes clear that the goal of AFA is to use The Response list to mobilize right-wing Christian voters -- probable Perry supporters -- in the upcoming election cycle. From the email, emphasis mine:

Today, I want to introduce you to Champion the Vote (CTV), a friend of AFA whose mission is to mobilize 5 million unregistered conservative Christians to register and vote according to the Biblical worldview in 2012. Only half of the Christians in the United States are registered to vote. Imagine the impact we could make on the future of America if these Christians made their voices heard in the voting booth!"
this Vermonter

Wolcott, VT

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#11
Aug 19, 2011
 

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Pagans, Christianity, and Charity

The idea in the West that individuals, organizations, and the state should offer help to those in need without an expectation that the favor will be returned -- charity -- is largely due to Christianity's influence. The Christian concept of charity was unique because it promoted the idea that charity was not just limited to one's own family or even one's own social or cultural group. From the founding of early Christianity to the modern age, Christians have carried with them a beneficial concept of charity that has had a substantial, positive impact on humanity

http://christiancadre.org/member_contrib/cp_c...

In sum, where Christianity spread it carried with it the teaching that charity was a religious duty and should be broadly given. When Christianity rose to prominence in the Roman Empire, new charitable programs were instituted. Through the Middle Ages, Christianity promoted wide-spread charity to those in need. Even into our modern day, the great charitable organizations in the West were founded upon this Christian ethic. Modern day polls also show that Christianity plays a very significant role in providing charitable giving and services. Accordingly, Christian promotion of charity is one of its great contributions to humanity
NonTheist

Norwood, MA

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Aug 19, 2011
 

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Concerning Christian Charity - PT 1

---------

Christian apologists often insist that their religion promotes extraordinary generosity and altruism. As proof, they point to Christian-sponsored hospitals, clinics, schools, colleges, homeless shelters, halfway houses, and other educational and charitable organizations. "And where are the atheist hospitals?" they tauntingly ask. "We don't see any atheist programs to help the poor and needy," they jeer.

But these claims are far weaker than they may appear. In Muslim countries, for example, there are Muslim schools and charities. In countries dominated by Buddhists we see Buddhist institutions. Even in Cuba, there are schools, hospitals, and public aid organizations, a fact that is frequently pointed to by apologists for Castro. So why should it be thought unusual that, where Christians are to be found in great numbers, there also are to be found Christian-sponsored charitable organizations?

Then there is the history of Christianity in the West. As recently as a few hundred years ago, it was dangerous, if not fatal, to so much as openly doubt Christian theological doctrines. That was the practical form that "Christian love" and "Christian charity" took for the overwhelming part of its history. Its ferocity was only moderated by the innovative principle of state-church separation, a principle still denied and denounced by the most energetic of Christian zealots. How, then, can special merit be accorded to Christianity? What is so singularly virtuous about doing what others are forcibly prevented from doing? And how honest and principled is it, given these circumstances, for Christians to claim exceptional virtue for themselves while disparaging their historical victims?

Even today, unbelievers are relentlessly reviled by many Christian leaders. Consider the following recent statements by U.S. leaders:

"No, I don't know that atheists should be considered as citizens, nor should they be considered as patriots. This is one nation under God." [President George Bush]

"The fact that we have freedom of religion doesn't mean we need to try to have freedom from religion." [President William Jefferson Clinton]

"Radicals and atheists are destroying families." [Hillary Rodham-Clinton]

Given the context of Christians' past and current treatment of those with contrary religious opinions, it is outrageous for anyone to point to Christian educational and charitable organizations as "proof" that Christianity excels at promoting compassion and humanitarianism. Those who make such fraudulent claims are like those who said, a century ago and more, that the absence of blacks and women in political office or other positions of responsibility "proved" that they lacked the character and intellect to vote or pursue professional careers. Then, as now, faith-blinded Christian apologists who are unwilling or unable to think excel in circular reasoning and question-begging, not in generosity or human feeling.

If Christianity were so spectacularly marked by the urge to give to others without asking anything in return, Christian institutions would have done far more than they have. As it is, almost all religious hospitals, clinics, schools, and colleges charge and collect fees that are the same as, or very little different than, similar non-religious organizations. Those associated with religious groups may receive modest or token subsidies, either in the form of cash from generous believers (and unbelievers!) or in the form of free labor provided by an order of monks, nuns, priests, and other volunteers. But the secular organizations engaged in the same activities manage not only to survive without such help but pay taxes to the state and dividends to their shareholders as well. A reasonable person would conclude that the religiously affiliated schools and hospitals, far from being praiseworthy examples of altruism, are, in fact, inefficient and wasteful of money and resources.
NonTheist

Norwood, MA

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Aug 19, 2011
 

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Christian apologists often insist that their religion promotes extraordinary generosity and altruism. As proof, they point to Christian-sponsored hospitals, clinics, schools, colleges, homeless shelters, halfway houses, and other educational and charitable organizations. "And where are the atheist hospitals?" they tauntingly ask. "We don't see any atheist programs to help the poor and needy," they jeer.

But these claims are far weaker than they may appear. In Muslim countries, for example, there are Muslim schools and charities. In countries dominated by Buddhists we see Buddhist institutions. Even in Cuba, there are schools, hospitals, and public aid organizations, a fact that is frequently pointed to by apologists for Castro. So why should it be thought unusual that, where Christians are to be found in great numbers, there also are to be found Christian-sponsored charitable organizations?

Then there is the history of Christianity in the West. As recently as a few hundred years ago, it was dangerous, if not fatal, to so much as openly doubt Christian theological doctrines. That was the practical form that "Christian love" and "Christian charity" took for the overwhelming part of its history. Its ferocity was only moderated by the innovative principle of state-church separation, a principle still denied and denounced by the most energetic of Christian zealots. How, then, can special merit be accorded to Christianity? What is so singularly virtuous about doing what others are forcibly prevented from doing? And how honest and principled is it, given these circumstances, for Christians to claim exceptional virtue for themselves while disparaging their historical victims?

Even today, unbelievers are relentlessly reviled by many Christian leaders. Consider the following recent statements by U.S. leaders:

"No, I don't know that atheists should be considered as citizens, nor should they be considered as patriots. This is one nation under God." [President George Bush]

"The fact that we have freedom of religion doesn't mean we need to try to have freedom from religion." [President William Jefferson Clinton]

"Radicals and atheists are destroying families." [Hillary Rodham-Clinton]

Given the context of Christians' past and current treatment of those with contrary religious opinions, it is outrageous for anyone to point to Christian educational and charitable organizations as "proof" that Christianity excels at promoting compassion and humanitarianism. Those who make such fraudulent claims are like those who said, a century ago and more, that the absence of blacks and women in political office or other positions of responsibility "proved" that they lacked the character and intellect to vote or pursue professional careers. Then, as now, faith-blinded Christian apologists who are unwilling or unable to think excel in circular reasoning and question-begging, not in generosity or human feeling.

If Christianity were so spectacularly marked by the urge to give to others without asking anything in return, Christian institutions would have done far more than they have. As it is, almost all religious hospitals, clinics, schools, and colleges charge and collect fees that are the same as, or very little different than, similar non-religious organizations. Those associated with religious groups may receive modest or token subsidies, either in the form of cash from generous believers (and unbelievers!) or in the form of free labor provided by an order of monks, nuns, priests, and other volunteers. But the secular organizations engaged in the same activities manage not only to survive without such help but pay taxes to the state and dividends to their shareholders as well. A reasonable person would conclude that the religiously affiliated schools and hospitals, far from being praiseworthy examples of altruism, are, in fact, inefficient and wasteful of money and resources.
NonTheist

Norwood, MA

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Aug 19, 2011
 

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Of course, shelters for the homeless and battered women, food banks, soup kitchens, and the like do not charge fees. They survive, almost without exception, on a variety of grants. Most often, these are government grants. But this is no less true of organizations affiliated with religious groups as with those that are not. Catholic Charities, for example, gets the majority of its funding from taxpayers. Charitable organizations also rely on the United Way and other funding sources that draw on society generally rather than on adherents of any specific religion. Even the bell-ringing Salvation Army "Santas" rely on the ordinary generosity of people generally, and not just on that of theologically correct Christians. Meanwhile, just as in the case of schools and hospitals, these religious-affiliated charitable organizations enjoy special advantages. Virtually all of them own land and other untaxed properties. In many cases, they enjoy streams of income from these assets as well as other unrelated activities, all of which are also untaxed. This represents a large subsidy from Christians and non-Christians alike, even for those religious organizations that do not receive outright grant monies from the taxpayers.

It is arguable whether such subsidies are a good value for the benefits received, even if they were not unconstitutional violations of state-church separation. But they are subsidies nonetheless. It is an abuse of the facts, of reason, and of the spirit in which these subsidies are given for anyone to claim that the success of the recipient organizations demonstrate the superiority of the religions with which they are affiliated. More importantly, it illustrates the wisdom of the First Amendment's Establishment Clause, which was intended to prevent this diversion of public funds to the support of religious proselytization.

This brings us to the most disturbing feature of religious "charities." For they are not motivated primarily by a compassionate desire to alleviate human suffering or the generous inclination to advance the cause of human happiness. This was well shown by many of the pronouncements of one of the most celebrated of Christian charitable leaders, the late, but still revered "Mother Theresa," who said: "I think it is very good when people suffer. To me, that is like the kiss of Jesus...." The same fundamental indifference both to human suffering and happiness is at the root of Christian groups' opposition not only to abortion but also to birth control and assisted reproductive technologies. Nowhere is this better shown than when religious charities are forced to choose between humanitarianism and their own theological teachings. Holy spirits beat flesh and blood human beings every time.
NonTheist

Norwood, MA

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Aug 19, 2011
 

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Thus the chief motivation for Christian "charity" is not love of humanity at all. It is love of Christian dogmas and doctrines. For Christian teachings do not hold that good works are good in themselves. Rather, good works merely serve to show the inward theological correctness that Christians believe is necessary to win entry into heaven and escape damnation. Good works are merely the "signs and wonders" that prove Christianity's divine authority. Most of all, good works are the bait to lure potential converts and the cost of being "saved." All of which demonstrates not that the Christian religion is morally superior, but that it is morally bankrupt.

Meanwhile, it turns out that there are secular schools, hospitals, clinics, homeless shelters, and other charities that do without Christian theology and Christian "morals." In fact, there are two varieties of them. There are those sponsored by various government agencies. And there are the previously mentioned private organizations, both non-profit and for-profit. Both public and private secular institutions have been far more successful at alleviating human suffering and promoting human happiness than any religion has ever been.

It is true, of course, that the funds extracted from taxpayers to pay for many of these secular programs are collected under threat of civil and criminal law. For this reason, it is often said that no moral credit ought to be imputed for the work they do. Yet religious organizations also depend on monies collected through taxation. Nor do they ever tire in seeking a greater share of it. It cannot be more praiseworthy for Christian charitable groups to spend these funds than for the government or a private secular organization to spend them. In fact, the opposite is the case. For the charitable Christian groups' interest is primarily in advancing the Christian religion with humanitarianism a distant secondary goal. In addition, however unworthy the tool of taxation may be, traditional Christian methods of collecting money, property, and treasure are far worse. The power of the state, after all, is obviously limited. But Christians claim that those who do not cooperate with them will suffer eternal torture in hellfire.

Not long ago, Christians enthusiastically delivered those who failed to cooperate to earthly flames well in advance of the alleged hellfire. But this is not what most of us today think of as generosity, charity, and loving-kindness.
Mike Mulligan

Boston, MA

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#16
Aug 19, 2011
 

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Yep, does your charity make you feel better, or does it make the poor and vulnerable feel better, lift them up....
Mike Mulligan

Boston, MA

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Aug 19, 2011
 

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Entergy, the Reformer and a bunch of other businesses do the same around Christmas...all sorts of charity events that elevates their public profile...

So they would rather throw pennies at the poor, rather than advocate and pressure state and federal to reorganize our world...

You know, a media campaign aimed at impacting a response to the political system...

That is what I have been saying for years, we are in the environment of expressed overpowering altruism in our media and our intentions...but no good or security ever reaches the vulnerable...
stardust

Englewood, CO

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Aug 19, 2011
 

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This is not new. Pat Robertson teaches this or did in the 1980s. It is taught from the pulpit in evangelical Churchianity & instructs churchgoers to infiltrate every aspect of society to bring about political change & the Millenium.

It is behind the plot to bring 'Intelligent Design' into the classroom & teach Creationism alongside the Theory of Evolution when there is no science behind it.

Glen Beck has an even nuttier but similiar version though he is a Mormon.

This is why we need to have total separation of church & state in government & schools to prevent kooks from molding society according to their ideological fancy.
Mike Mulligan

Boston, MA

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#19
Aug 19, 2011
 
You meant that as a limitation of the left than a limitation on the religious right...
Mike Mulligan

Boston, MA

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#20
Aug 19, 2011
 
You meant that as a limitation on the left than a limitation on the religious right...

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