Richard Adams, early figure in gay ma...

Richard Adams, early figure in gay marriage, dies

There are 9 comments on the KKCO-TV Grand Junction story from Dec 23, 2012, titled Richard Adams, early figure in gay marriage, dies. In it, KKCO-TV Grand Junction reports that:

Richard Adams, an early mover in the push for same-sex marriage both at the altar and in the courts, has died.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at KKCO-TV Grand Junction.

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#3 Dec 23, 2012
An age is passing. Who will pick up the torch?

You will be missed, Rich.

“ reality, what a concept”

Since: Nov 07

this one

#4 Dec 23, 2012
I had never heard this story and learned it only recently after finding a question in a deck of trivia cards.

What year did the first legal same sex marriages take place in Colorado?

The answer on the card is 1976, but it turns out in 1975, 5 same sex couples were given marriage licenses by the Boulder County's Clerk and Recorder's office after an Assistant District Attorney issued a memorandum that said to the effect that there was nothing under Colorado law that would prevent their issuance, but since the issue had not been addressed by the Legislature, Clerks were free to accept or reject such applications. The real hero in this story, Clela Rorex, the Boulder County Clerk, began approving applications, first for David Zamora and David McCord, who never found the backing for the court battle they were looking to wage and over the next few weeks to four other couples including Adams and Sullivan. The marriages were annulled by a decision of the state Attorney General in May of the same year on the basis that even though they weren't illegal, that didn't necessarily make them legal.

The only lawsuit that arose out of these marriages was that of Adams and Sullivan attempting to use their marriage as a basis to keep Sullivan, an Australian national, in this country, but this was back in the day when homosexuality was something that could keep you out of this country in the first place. Their case went nowhere, I can't recall if Sullivan was deported or not.

“ reality, what a concept”

Since: Nov 07

this one

#9 Dec 23, 2012
I realize that this is going to end up looking as if I was talking to myself, but I swear there was another post here when I started.

Sugarplum, your posts are committing suicide. They are offing themselves for being the thoughts of a complete idiot.

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#13 Dec 23, 2012
Rick in Kansas wrote:
I had never heard this story and learned it only recently after finding a question in a deck of trivia cards.
What year did the first legal same sex marriages take place in Colorado?
The answer on the card is 1976, but it turns out in 1975, 5 same sex couples were given marriage licenses by the Boulder County's Clerk and Recorder's office after an Assistant District Attorney issued a memorandum that said to the effect that there was nothing under Colorado law that would prevent their issuance, but since the issue had not been addressed by the Legislature, Clerks were free to accept or reject such applications. The real hero in this story, Clela Rorex, the Boulder County Clerk, began approving applications, first for David Zamora and David McCord, who never found the backing for the court battle they were looking to wage and over the next few weeks to four other couples including Adams and Sullivan. The marriages were annulled by a decision of the state Attorney General in May of the same year on the basis that even though they weren't illegal, that didn't necessarily make them legal.
The only lawsuit that arose out of these marriages was that of Adams and Sullivan attempting to use their marriage as a basis to keep Sullivan, an Australian national, in this country, but this was back in the day when homosexuality was something that could keep you out of this country in the first place. Their case went nowhere, I can't recall if Sullivan was deported or not.
Think for a minute. THE CASTRO, the world's first gayborhood was only really 5 yrs old, and Harvey was still running losing campaigns public office. Stonewall was only 7 yrs prior.

Bilitis, Mattachine, etc. aside, we were still in our infancy.

Nothing, and I mean NOTHING, had yet been done to soften the ground for any such seeds of change. No court precedents, few independent case studies or researches.

In those days, if you came out with such actions into the national spotlight, you stood pretty much alone and with your hair in fire.

Our community hadn't yet recognized itself sufficiently to offer much in the way of support.

Just as with the larger human population, it has been the tragedies we've experienced that have forged in us the sense of our membership in a community.

http://takeaction.aidshealth.org/images/conte...

Community members like Rich truly are our heroes. They faced the winds with little to no cover.

“ reality, what a concept”

Since: Nov 07

this one

#17 Dec 24, 2012
snyper wrote:
Think for a minute.
I was 13 when this happened, so missing it at the time is pretty understandable, but in 37 years since, I hadn't even stumbled across the story. It took a game of "Raunchy Trivia", that I had bought at a yard sale, to let me know that it had even happened. It is just such a fascinating story once you get into it. Roswell Howell and Dolly, priceless and an answer to that kind of nonsense that had never occurred to me. it was the last and better of the two attempts to kill the Baker ruling in its infancy and they got no help. I had heard about Marjorie Jones and her partner who tried to overturn the law in Kentucky and how she got abandoned by the ACLU before she could get to the state Supreme Court, but this, I hadn't heard anyof it until a couple of weeks ago.

Rosa Winkel

Helensvale, Australia

#18 Dec 25, 2012
Rick in Kansas wrote:
I had never heard this story and learned it only recently after finding a question in a deck of trivia cards.
What year did the first legal same sex marriages take place in Colorado?
The answer on the card is 1976, but it turns out in 1975, 5 same sex couples were given marriage licenses by the Boulder County's Clerk and Recorder's office after an Assistant District Attorney issued a memorandum that said to the effect that there was nothing under Colorado law that would prevent their issuance, but since the issue had not been addressed by the Legislature, Clerks were free to accept or reject such applications. The real hero in this story, Clela Rorex, the Boulder County Clerk, began approving applications, first for David Zamora and David McCord, who never found the backing for the court battle they were looking to wage and over the next few weeks to four other couples including Adams and Sullivan. The marriages were annulled by a decision of the state Attorney General in May of the same year on the basis that even though they weren't illegal, that didn't necessarily make them legal.
The only lawsuit that arose out of these marriages was that of Adams and Sullivan attempting to use their marriage as a basis to keep Sullivan, an Australian national, in this country, but this was back in the day when homosexuality was something that could keep you out of this country in the first place. Their case went nowhere, I can't recall if Sullivan was deported or not.
I remember the case on the news, but was only a kid @ the time. I think Adams & Sullivan did live in Australia for awhile.
RIP Richard Adams.

“ reality, what a concept”

Since: Nov 07

this one

#19 Dec 25, 2012
Rosa Winkel wrote:
I remember the case on the news, but was only a kid @ the time. I think Adams & Sullivan did live in Australia for awhile.
RIP Richard Adams.
It must have made the headlines in this part of the world when it happened and I just missed it somehow and only learned about it because of a trivia question.
Rosa Winkel

East Maitland, Australia

#20 Dec 25, 2012
Rick in Kansas wrote:
<quoted text>It must have made the headlines in this part of the world when it happened and I just missed it somehow and only learned about it because of a trivia question.
Interesting!
At least Adams and Sullivan followed the old "til death us do part" much more than some straight, legally married couples.
Just Joe

Boiling Springs, SC

#22 Mar 13, 2013
It was 1976 when these were issued because I was one of the applicants and I still have the license.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Boulder Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Review: iLoveKickboxing - Longmont 18 hr Haleigh 9
Colorado is Full....Now go Home ! Wed CO Rules 4
News Feeling the heat, Boulder looks to bring ice cr... Jul 25 Ban Boulder 3
News Boulder hopes to move Xcel off long-term commit... Jul 24 litesong 2
News Students hack into school system, change grades (Apr '07) Jul 21 Sydna 668
News Old evidence at new trial (May '06) Jul 21 Abudia 1,125
News La Choza expands in Boulder as owner's 'dream i... Jul 15 Kalizar 2

Boulder Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Boulder Mortgages