Miami-Dade Cops Fired for Allegedly Ignoring Dispatch Calls

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Pesteacrystal

Miami, FL

#1 Mar 30, 2013
What a disgrace, I wonder how many are Miami Cubans.

"Miami-Dade Cops Fired for Allegedly Ignoring Dispatch Calls"

A Miami-Dade County police sergeant and two officers have been fired, while three others have been suspended, for allegedly blowing off emergency dispatch calls, officials said.

Authorities launched an internal police investigation into the Kendall District police squad in 2010. Sgt. Jennifer Gonzalez and officers Dario Socarras and Jose Huerta have been fired while officers Jeffrey Price, Fabian Owens and Ivan Tomas were stripped of their badges, officials said. The three fired employees have appealed to get their jobs back.

Police say they secretly watched and videotaped the officers’ allegedly shopping and visiting family outside the police district while on the clock.

“The idea of not going to a call honestly never crosses your mind,” James Loftus, a former Miami-Dade police director, said.“That’s not so much about being a bad cop, that’s about being a bad human being.”

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2013/02...
Alex in miami

United States

#2 Mar 30, 2013
Los indios apestosos tienen envidia que la policia no los quieren porque solo saben tirar flechas!
Jose Pepe Diaz

Sarasota, FL

#3 Mar 30, 2013
Pesteacrystal wrote:
What a disgrace, I wonder how many are Miami Cubans.
"Miami-Dade Cops Fired for Allegedly Ignoring Dispatch Calls"
A Miami-Dade County police sergeant and two officers have been fired, while three others have been suspended, for allegedly blowing off emergency dispatch calls, officials said.
Authorities launched an internal police investigation into the Kendall District police squad in 2010. Sgt. Jennifer Gonzalez and officers Dario Socarras and Jose Huerta have been fired while officers Jeffrey Price, Fabian Owens and Ivan Tomas were stripped of their badges, officials said. The three fired employees have appealed to get their jobs back.
Police say they secretly watched and videotaped the officers’ allegedly shopping and visiting family outside the police district while on the clock.
“The idea of not going to a call honestly never crosses your mind,” James Loftus, a former Miami-Dade police director, said.“That’s not so much about being a bad cop, that’s about being a bad human being.”
http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2013/02...
None are Cubans,they are Venezuelans and Nicaraguans and one from Ecuador!
Alex in miami

United States

#6 Mar 30, 2013
Jose Pepe Diaz wrote:
<quoted text>
None are Cubans,they are Venezuelans and Nicaraguans and one from Ecuador!
Haha, Ese Indio tiene peste!
peste a lechon

United States

#7 Mar 30, 2013
No importa nosotros somos tainos con peste a lechon y bien orgullosos de vivir del welfare
PRODIGY

Miami, FL

#8 Mar 30, 2013
Taíno people
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the indigenous peoples of Bahamas, Antilles, and Lesser Antilles. For other indigenous peoples, see Indigenous peoples (disambiguation). For other uses, see Taíno.
Taíno people

Statue of Agüeybaná II, "El Bravo", in Ponce, Puerto Rico
Total population
ancestral to mestizo population
Regions with significant populations
Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, Cuba, Bahamas, Jamaica
Languages
Taino language, later Spanish, English, Creole
Religion
Indigenous, later Christianity
The Taínos were seafaring indigenous peoples of the Bahamas, Greater Antilles, and the northern Lesser Antilles. They were one of the Arawak peoples of South America,[1] and the Taíno language was a member of the Arawakan language family of northern South America.
At the time of Columbus' arrival in 1492, there were five Taíno chiefdoms and territories on Hispaniola (modern day Haiti and Dominican Republic), each led by a principal Cacique (chieftain), to whom tribute was paid. Puerto Rico also was divided into chiefdoms. As the hereditary head chief of Taíno tribes, the cacique was paid significant tribute. Caciques enjoyed the privilege of wearing golden pendants called guanin, living in square bohíos instead of the round ones that the villagers inhabited, and sitting on wooden stools when receiving guests. At the time of the Spanish conquest, the largest Taíno population centers may have contained over 3,000 people each.[citation needed]
The Taínos were historically enemies of the neighboring Carib tribes, another group with origins in South America who lived principally in the Lesser Antilles.[2] The relationship between the two groups has been the subject of much study. For much of the 15th century, the Taíno tribe was being driven to the northeast in the Caribbean (out of what is now South America) because of raids by Caribs. Many Carib women spoke Taíno because of the large number of female Taíno captives among them.[3]
The Spaniards who first arrived in the Bahamas, Cuba, and Hispaniola in 1492, and later in Puerto Rico, did not bring women. They took Taíno women for their wives, which resulted in mestizo children.[4] Rape of Taíno women by the Spanish was also common.[5]

[6] It is argued that there was substantial mestizaje (racial and cultural mixing) as well as several Indian pueblos that survived into the 19th century in Cuba.
The Taínos were wiped out by Spanish settlers, who arrived after Christopher Columbus landed on the island in 1492 and who introduced new diseases and fought with and enslaved the natives.

[7] By 1548 the native population was under 500.[7] By the 18th century, Taíno society had been devastated by introduced diseases such as smallpox, as well as other factors such as intermarriages and forced assimilation into the plantation economy that Spain imposed in its Caribbean colonies, with its subsequent importation of African slave workers. The first recorded smallpox outbreak in Hispaniola occurred in December 1518 or January 1519.
PRODIGY

Miami, FL

#9 Mar 30, 2013
The State (Columbia, S.C.)
Tue, Aug. 17, 2004
Historians work to set record straight on Cuba's Taino Indians

BY GARY MARX
Chicago Tribune

YARA, Cuba -(KRT)- In a sweltering coastal settlement, Alejandro Hartmann pulled out a spiral notebook and jotted notes as a local peasant described his family's ties to a long forgotten indigenous group that is witnessing a modest resurgence.

"What is the name of your mother and father?" Hartmann asked Julio Fuentes, a wisp of a man parked on a wooden bench. "Where do they live? How old are they?"

Hartmann fired off a dozen more questions as part of his effort to complete the first census of the descendants of the Taino Indians, an indigenous group that once thrived in this remote region of eastern Cuba and later were thought to be extinct.

"Julio is a mixture of Spanish and Indian like many people," explained Hartmann, a historian and Taino expert. "I want to eliminate the myth once and for all that the Indians were extinguished in Cuba."

For years, anthropologists widely believed this island's once-powerful Taino Indians were exterminated shortly after Christopher Columbus sailed into a pristine bay and walked the steep, thickly forested terrain more than 500 years ago.

The explorer spent only a week in the area in 1492 but described the Taino as gentle, hard-working people growing crops and navigating the crystalline waters in huge dug-out canoes.

But, in a familiar story throughout the Americas, war and disease decimated the Taino, whose sense of identity was further razed over the centuries by racism and by generations of intermixing with whites, blacks and others who settled here.

Today, it's difficult to differentiate Taino descendents from the average Cuban peasant, or guajiro, as they are called.
Alex in miami

United States

#10 Mar 30, 2013
peste a lechon wrote:
No importa nosotros somos tainos con peste a lechon y bien orgullosos de vivir del welfare
Yo no! Yo tengo el privilegio de decir que soy gringo cuando me conviene. Algo que se puede decir cuando eres orgulloso de ser Americano igual. No como tanto lechon y no recibo welfare.
Alex in miami

United States

#11 Mar 30, 2013
Even if I need welfare. They won't give it to me because I'm not black, south american, or a fresh rafter. Sad, my son could use some help with medical expenses but since we are divorced white natural citizens and he is not an "unclaimed" bastard we have to deal with the full cost of having an autistic child, and we don't even get the benefit of a bastard child tax credit. But I wouldn't have it any other way!
Jose Pepe Diaz

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#12 Mar 30, 2013
PRODIGY wrote:
The State (Columbia, S.C.)
Tue, Aug. 17, 2004
Historians work to set record straight on Cuba's Taino Indians
BY GARY MARX
Chicago Tribune
YARA, Cuba -(KRT)- In a sweltering coastal settlement, Alejandro Hartmann pulled out a spiral notebook and jotted notes as a local peasant described his family's ties to a long forgotten indigenous group that is witnessing a modest resurgence.
"What is the name of your mother and father?" Hartmann asked Julio Fuentes, a wisp of a man parked on a wooden bench. "Where do they live? How old are they?"
Hartmann fired off a dozen more questions as part of his effort to complete the first census of the descendants of the Taino Indians, an indigenous group that once thrived in this remote region of eastern Cuba and later were thought to be extinct.
"Julio is a mixture of Spanish and Indian like many people," explained Hartmann, a historian and Taino expert. "I want to eliminate the myth once and for all that the Indians were extinguished in Cuba."
For years, anthropologists widely believed this island's once-powerful Taino Indians were exterminated shortly after Christopher Columbus sailed into a pristine bay and walked the steep, thickly forested terrain more than 500 years ago.
The explorer spent only a week in the area in 1492 but described the Taino as gentle, hard-working people growing crops and navigating the crystalline waters in huge dug-out canoes.
But, in a familiar story throughout the Americas, war and disease decimated the Taino, whose sense of identity was further razed over the centuries by racism and by generations of intermixing with whites, blacks and others who settled here.
Today, it's difficult to differentiate Taino descendents from the average Cuban peasant, or guajiro, as they are called.
You are so ignorant that it hurts!Cuban peasants are mainly descenants of Spaniard from the Canary Island! There are no tainos or mixtures of ainos in Cuba!I think you got the wrong island!
CaucasianCubans

Miami, FL

#13 Mar 31, 2013
Jose Pepe Diaz wrote:
<quoted text>
You are so ignorant that it hurts!Cuban peasants are mainly descenants of Spaniard from the Canary Island! There are no tainos or mixtures of ainos in Cuba!I think you got the wrong island!
Well said, you will always hear comments that Cubans are mixed with this and that, yes their are many who have mixed since Castro took over and destroyed not only the way of life and wealth Cuba once had but it's genetics. The comments are mostly from mixed individuals who believe that every other person with a Hispanic name is either mixed with black or Amerindian and it's not at all true. like
PRODIGY

Miami, FL

#14 Mar 31, 2013
CaucasianCubans wrote:
<quoted text>Well said, you will always hear comments that Cubans are mixed with this and that, yes their are many who have mixed since Castro took over and destroyed not only the way of life and wealth Cuba once had but it's genetics. The comments are mostly from mixed individuals who believe that every other person with a Hispanic name is either mixed with black or Amerindian and it's not at all true. like
so sunshine
please explain how those spaniards reproduce? since only men were allowed to traveled in the boats.
they raped the taino women and that's where you came from.
pay for a DNA test it's only $300
PRODIGY

Miami, FL

#15 Mar 31, 2013
PRODIGY

Miami, FL

#16 Mar 31, 2013
March 2, 2010
Indians in Cuba
Author: BarreiroJose
CSQ Issue: 13.3 (Fall 1989) Central America and the Caribbean
Punta Maisi, Cuba

The old Indian woman, a descendant of Cuba's Taino-Arawak people, bent over and touched the leaves of a small tree. Her open-palmed hand lifted the round, green leaves in a light handshake. "These are good for inflammations of the ovaries," she said. "I gave them to all my young women." "She knows a lot," her daughter, Marta, said. "She doesn't need a pharmacy. You have something wrong with your body, she can make you a tea - un cocimiento - and fix you up."

The mother and two sisters, part of a large extended family known in this town for its Indian ancestry, continued to show me their patio. Around an old well, where they wash their laundry, they pointed out more than a dozen herbs and other useful plants. The Cobas Hernandez clan, from which Maria and her several daughters, her son, Pedro, and his brothers spring, counts several living generations of families from here to the city of Baracoa, about 120 km west from Los Arados on Cuba's southern coast. They are not the only such extended family and they are not the only people of clear Indian ancestry in Cuba still living in their aboriginal areas.

It may surprise many social scientists that nestled in the mountains of the Oriente region (eastern Cuba), from Baracoa on the southern coast all the way to the Pico Turquino, the highest mountain in Cuba, there are numerous caserios, several barrios, and at least one community of more than a thousand Indian people. They were called Cubeños by Father Bartolome de Las Casas, who helped some of their communities to survive, and are ancestors of the original Tainos who met Columbus.

In March and April 1989, I traveled to Santiago de Cuba to attend a conference, "Seeds of Commerce," mutually sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution and a Cuban research center, the Casa del Caribe. I took the opportunity to extend my visit for two weeks, first in the Baracoa-Punta Maisi region and then west to the plains country of Camaguey. I wanted to ascertain the veracity of testimonies that I had heard as a child and that have been recently published in Cuban academic journals, to the effect that Taino-Arawak descendants inhabit the eastern region of Cuba. I wanted to reacquaint myself with the people of guajiro background still prevalent in the Camaguey countryside.
PRODIGY

Miami, FL

#17 Mar 31, 2013
I heard about the Indian families of Baracoa while I was growing up in the Camaguey region, some 300 km to the northeast of Baracoa, during the 1950s, before I migrated to the United States at age 12.

Among my elder relatives, don Joseito Veloz (born 1891) migrated to Camaguey from the vicinity of the oriental mountain city of Bayamo. Don Joseito told stories about the old communities in and near Baracoa. He was himself what is called in Camaguey a "guajiro," and one who pointed out the Indian origins of many of his customs and lifeways: the thatch-roof bohio made out of the royal palm so abundant in Cuba; and his yucca field and his custom of eating the yucca bread, casabe, and the traditional Taino soup, called the ajiaco. Guajiro identity, customs, and lifestyle still prevail throughout the Camaguey region.(1)

More recently, after writing for some years on diverse Indian cultures, indigenous development, agriculture, and human rights issues, I noticed several articles in the Cuban press detailing studies carried out among the Indian descendants in the Baracoa region. The studies were carried out by investigators from the University of Havana, in cooperation with scientists from Belgium, Czechoslovakia, and the Soviet Union.

Rivero de la Calle Study

At the University of Havana, I met the chief investigator of those studies, Manuel Rivero de la Calle, a gentle, soft-spoken scholar who is dean of Cuban anthropology. He started work in the Oriente area in the mid-1960s, leading a team that for several years conducted studies in physical and biological anthropology with an extended "base" population in the Yateras municipality of the new province of Guantánamo, not far from Baracoa.

Rivero's biological study, conducted in two stages - 1964 and 1972-1973 - focused exclusively on certifying racial composition on a sample of 300 people of Indian origin in the Yateras municipality. His methodology included anthropometric measurements and somastopic observations (following the International Biologic Program), serulogic characteristics, and family genealogies.

The methodology of "physical anthropology," which uses anthropometric measurements, is considered antiquated by North American scholars and insulting by many Indians. Nevertheless, it proves fruitful in initially identifying the effusive Cuban indigenous population.

Rivero's conclusions challenged official academic and sociological positions in Cuba - positions accepted by the international academy - that the Indian population of Cuba was totally extinguished by 1550. Indeed, the scientists found that at least 1,000 people conforming to physical characteristics associated with the Arawak branch of Amazonian Indian peoples live in Yateras alone. The studies assert what oral and written historical sources have also attested: the Yateras Indians are a core group in a larger pattern of extended families and communities of similar Indian origin, now increasingly intermarried with other Cubans of Iberian and African ancestry.
PRODIGY

Miami, FL

#18 Mar 31, 2013
Historical References
The existence of an Indian population and identity in Cuba was vehemently denied for most of the twentieth century, primarily by the Cuban scholar Fernando Ortiz. A liberal professor of Hispanic ancestry, Ortiz saw the question of Indian identity as a ploy by the right wing to obfuscate black issues. Deeply conversant in all the social sciences, Ortiz was limited by a Havana base and by a purist, "bell jar" anthropological perspective of Indian-ness. This perspective maintains that American Indians cease to be "real" Indians as they adapt Western tools and methods. Indian "cultures" are assumed frozen at the moment of contact with "the West." Although he framed the theme of "transculturation" in Cuban letters, Ortiz provided the tree of Cuban multiethnicity with a strictly Ibero-African trunk. The assertion became that all Cuban Indians, purportedly a weak and timid people, were exterminated by 1550.
Nevertheless, the historic and ethnographic record supports the Indian presence in eastern Cuba - the existence of its actual population of descendants and its cultural extensions. Both Rivero and Antonio Nunez Jiménez, a prominent Cuban naturalist - and other historical references - confirm the existence of dozens of Indian family nuclei (caserios) in the extended region of Oriente, from Baracoa to Punta Maisi, to the Sierra Maestra and the Pico Turquino. In the absence of a proper census, it is hard to hazard a guess as to the total population of Indian descendants in the general Oriente area, but it probably comes to several thousand people.
Miguel Rodriguez Ferrer, a Spanish scientist who visited the area in 1847, wrote in the 1870s about finding Indian communities at El Caney, in Jiguani, and on the banks of the Yumuri River (Baracoa). He wrote that the people lived in bohios, and "gifted me with a dance" - possibly an Areito, the round dance of the Tainos - during which they recited cosmologies.
Jose Martí, the poet and revolutionary apostle of Cuban independence, traveled in the area in his final days, camping with Indian families. His diary entries just prior to his death in a Spanish ambush in May 1895 describe the "indios de Garrido" direct ancestors of the Yateras families. Martí wondered at reports that some Indians were scouting for the Spanish troops against the insurrectionists. In a letter of 23 June 1895, possibly in answer to Martí's inquiry, another major historical figure. General Antonio Maceo, who commanded troops in the area, commented that the "Indians of Yateras" had now passed into the Cuban insurrectionary ranks.
A French doctor and anthropologist, Henri Dumont, who for decades lived in the eastern sugar plantations and provided care for black slaves, wrote in 1922 about the existence of Indians in the interior provinces of Cuba - "but where they abound with most frequency is in the eastern department".
The Cuban historian Felipe Pichardo Moya wrote in 1945 that during the 1840s Indians in El Caney, near Santiago, could muster "several hundred pureblood warriors." In March 1845, Remigio Torres, a "pure-blood Indian" clerk of the municipality, claimed lands for the Indian population of the "many Indians in the extended semi-circle from the Paso de la Virgen to the foothills of the Sierra de Limones." As proof of cultural continuity, the Indian clerk asserted that every Sunday Indian people held their original dances. In 1849, the same clerk, still arguing Indian land rights, told a meeting of the Cabildo: "You know that it is very rare for a natural of the People to mix his Indian blood with that of the Spanish, and insofar as marriage with the people of color, this was never permitted to them as per arrangement with the sovereign dispositions." As late as 1936, an official Cuban map of Oriente Province showed Indian reservations at Tiguabos (between Baracoa and Santiago) and at Palenque.
PRODIGY

Miami, FL

#19 Mar 31, 2013
My questions concentrated on a person's basis or rationale for claiming an Indian identity. All pointed to family history: "We are an Indian family. It has been always that way." "We do Indian things, like my mother, she drinks from a jicara, nothing else, she won't use a glass or a cup." "We know the wilderness [manigua]."

Going toward the Punta Maisi lighthouse, I asked Hartmann about the reluctance of some Cuban academics to accept the Indian identity in this area of Cuba. He responded, "Well, even Rivero, he refuses to say the people here are Indians - he defines them as 'descendants' of Indians. It is common to say that there are no Indians left in Cuba."

"But I am here," Pedro Hernandez said from the back seat. "Indians or descendants, it's the same thing. They, the old Tainos, were here. Now, we, my generation, we are here. We don't live exactly like they did, but we are still here."
Jose Pepe Diaz

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#20 Mar 31, 2013
"1,000 people conforming to physical characteristics associated "

Even giving credit to your bullshit there are 1,000 'indians' out of Cuba's population of 11 million Cubans
So what? What are you trying to prove!There are millions of indians in the USA '
PRODIGY

Miami, FL

#21 Mar 31, 2013
Alex in miami wrote:
<quoted text>Yo no! Yo tengo el privilegio de decir que soy gringo cuando me conviene. Algo que se puede decir cuando eres orgulloso de ser Americano igual. No como tanto lechon y no recibo welfare.
How can you break up a Nicaraguan parade in Miami?

Ask them if they want to go vote.

How many negros does it take in Florida to out vote one White Cubano?

100,000
PRODIGY

Miami, FL

#22 Mar 31, 2013
CaucasianCubans wrote:
<quoted text>Well said, you will always hear comments that Cubans are mixed with this and that, yes their are many who have mixed since Castro took over and destroyed not only the way of life and wealth Cuba once had but it's genetics. The comments are mostly from mixed individuals who believe that every other person with a Hispanic name is either mixed with black or Amerindian and it's not at all true. like
You are correct, I was ill informed as ALWAYS.

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