Curly-Tailed Lizard Population Threatens Native Lizards

In 60 years, an exotic carnivore capable of devouring Florida's native lizards has taken over more than 50 miles of South Florida's urban coastline. Full Story
Beth

Miami, FL

#25 May 1, 2010
What threatens native lizards are not curly tails but the hourly destruction of natural habitats due to developments in Florida so unless curly tails are driving bulldozers,cement mixers they won't make a dent in the native lizerd population.

Truth is curly tails can live where green anoles who need GREEN foilage can not and many times simply fill another vacant cement field that humans have created.

“BILLARY 2016 ”

Since: Aug 07

Location hidden

#26 May 2, 2010
Beth wrote:
What threatens native lizards are not curly tails but the hourly destruction of natural habitats due to developments in Florida so unless curly tails are driving bulldozers,cement mixers they won't make a dent in the native lizerd population.
Truth is curly tails can live where green anoles who need GREEN foilage can not and many times simply fill another vacant cement field that humans have created.
Beth, curly tails are NOT native to Florida. They need to be eradicated and I'm doing my part. There are only two left living above my screen over the pool. I've gotten rid of 6 now but apparently they breed like rabbits. I have hope though. THere are 3 chameleons living in the same area but they don't come out when the nasty curly tales are around. Chameleons ARE native to Fla. Btw, despite habitat destruction, they still live in and around peoples homes and homes aren't going anywhere, anytime soon.
Beth

Miami, FL

#27 May 5, 2010
x0x0x wrote:
<quoted text>Beth, curly tails are NOT native to Florida. They need to be eradicated and I'm doing my part. There are only two left living above my screen over the pool. I've gotten rid of 6 now but apparently they breed like rabbits. I have hope though. THere are 3 chameleons living in the same area but they don't come out when the nasty curly tales are around. Chameleons ARE native to Fla. Btw, despite habitat destruction, they still live in and around peoples homes and homes aren't going anywhere, anytime soon.
Yes they are non native but considering how close Haiti is and hundreds of yrs of ship trade,etc I imagine they have been here for over hundred yrs the green anoles can not live in the hourly growing development that Florida is while some non natives can and flourish.

You can kill all the curly tails but its the bulldozer and cement mixer who are the true problem.
I just dont see them as the problem and by me they put up a shopping center in what was once lush green area loaded with trees. The green anoles moved out and the curlys moved in .

Its like when that full of bull FWC cries about monitors going after the borrowing owl yet the state with NEVER a peep from FWC has taken 95% of the owls area for golf courses,etc and as you know same about Florida panther.

Non natives are a zero issue . Many since from Caribbeans have been here for easily over 100 yrs but the growing development has now paved a road for them because the natives can't handle the development.

BeatNick

West Palm Beach, FL

#29 Jun 10, 2010
go hillary wrote:
the haitians eat the curly tails... maybe thats why they smell like shit.
I have a solution, feed the Haitians to the curly tails.

“BILLARY 2016 ”

Since: Aug 07

Location hidden

#30 Jun 11, 2010
Well the curlytails left my roof but now they live under the pool pump and the air conditioning unit. They are so fast...they see you coming and they run. Of course, I had three chameleons and those fu$*#s ate them. Hardly any brown lizards left after the cold winter. I hate CT. We have got to eradicate those nasty things.
captiankaos

Fort Lauderdale, FL

#31 Jun 13, 2010
x0x0x wrote:
These lizards, NOT native to Florida are killing native lizards and chameleons at an alarming rate. Chameleons and lizards eat all the bugs listed above and did so WAAAAAY before the curly tail invaded. These curly tails are very aggressive, large and I actually have tried to get rid of them for years but they are fast and elusive. I managed to dispose of one of their babies the other day and I felt awful about it but I want them out of my yard. Apparently, you can buy poison or use fly paper so that will be my next move.
how do we KILL them

“BILLARY 2016 ”

Since: Aug 07

Location hidden

#32 Jun 13, 2010
captiankaos wrote:
<quoted text>
how do we KILL them
How about fly paper? Or that stuff they catch mice with? It's sticky. I don't know. Like I said, they are really fast and hard to sneak up on.
Mark in Tamarac

United States

#33 Jul 25, 2010
I think that those curly tail lizards are actually quite beautiful. They are smart, clever and seem to be very territorial. I admire the way they sun themselves on our yard rocks. I've never seen them be aggressive towards other lizards which still seem quite plentiful in my yard areas. I deplore those who try and kill a species with such cruelty as flypaper, destroying the young and quite contrary to most areas, use BB to shoot them. Cold weather will surely keep them in check as it has the iguana population which so many railed about last year. As for those racist comments about comments...very are totally out of line and deplorable.

“BILLARY 2016 ”

Since: Aug 07

Location hidden

#34 Jul 25, 2010
Mark in Tamarac wrote:
I think that those curly tail lizards are actually quite beautiful. They are smart, clever and seem to be very territorial. I admire the way they sun themselves on our yard rocks. I've never seen them be aggressive towards other lizards which still seem quite plentiful in my yard areas. I deplore those who try and kill a species with such cruelty as flypaper, destroying the young and quite contrary to most areas, use BB to shoot them. Cold weather will surely keep them in check as it has the iguana population which so many railed about last year. As for those racist comments about comments...very are totally out of line and deplorable.
Racist against whom? Curly tails? That doesn't even make sense.

They are not indigenous to Florida. Period. They are agressive and feed on the young lizards who don't stand a chance against them. They can swallow them in one full swoop. I have seen it with my own eyes. They will also raid a birds nest of its eggs.

We are obligated to eradicate them as they have nearly wiped out the Chameleon population, a species that IS native to Florida. You want to see something truly beautiful, watch a chameleon change from bright green to red to brown. Even better, look at a salamander that is black, blue, purple etc. THAT is beauty.

As for enjoying them sunning themselves, ALL lizards do that to SURVIVE. Notice how the cold wiped out the smaller lizard populations but it didn't effect the curly tails at all.

I will continue to get rid of them because I am a native of Florida and actually care about our reptillian friends. I save snakes, birds, skinks, turtles on a weekly basis since we live near the water. It's my duty as well as to educate the misinformed, such as yourself.
captiveinflorida

Lake Worth, FL

#35 Jul 31, 2010
I used to think the curly tail lizards were cute until I saw a big one eating a small native lizard in my yard. I was horrified. I have since seen both co-existing however. I hope that was a random act of insanity on the curly tail's part. Then again I saw a native lizard eating a beautiful orange butterfly one day and was horrified at that!
Floridagirl

Bloomfield, NJ

#36 Aug 8, 2010
First of all There are no "true" Chameleons in florida the are called green anoles. Green anoles like most species of lizards will eat their own young too, much like the curly tails did.Being mostly aboreal the anoles dont reside on the ground where the curly tails live except for the brown anoles that are another non-native that if they do get eaten it may not be a bad thing since THEY are aggressive and affect the native anole population.The niche that the curly tails reside in has little effect on the native anoles what you should be concerned about is erradicating feral cats! they have caused far more damage then the lizards ever could! Impacting native birds,reptiles and other native animals.The curly tails are non native for sure but have caused very little if any damge to native wildlife. Humans distroying habitats and releasing cats are your main culprits here!

Since: Jul 10

Metuchen, NJ

#37 Aug 8, 2010
Cooley Reese wrote:
DONt no NUFFIN BOUT NO DAMN curly tails but what I gots to no is whare all the WHITE WIMMENS be at?
Hooks a brother up.
DYNOMITES!!!!
lol lol lol that's all i gotta say!

Since: Jul 10

Metuchen, NJ

#38 Aug 8, 2010
Beth wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes they are non native but considering how close Haiti is and hundreds of yrs of ship trade,etc I imagine they have been here for over hundred yrs the green anoles can not live in the hourly growing development that Florida is while some non natives can and flourish.
You can kill all the curly tails but its the bulldozer and cement mixer who are the true problem.
I just dont see them as the problem and by me they put up a shopping center in what was once lush green area loaded with trees. The green anoles moved out and the curlys moved in .
Its like when that full of bull FWC cries about monitors going after the borrowing owl yet the state with NEVER a peep from FWC has taken 95% of the owls area for golf courses,etc and as you know same about Florida panther.
Non natives are a zero issue . Many since from Caribbeans have been here for easily over 100 yrs but the growing development has now paved a road for them because the natives can't handle the development.
I tend to think u r right Beth! The person who is killing them should stop!!

Since: Jul 10

Metuchen, NJ

#39 Aug 8, 2010
x0x0x wrote:
<quoted text>Racist against whom? Curly tails? That doesn't even make sense.
They are not indigenous to Florida. Period. They are agressive and feed on the young lizards who don't stand a chance against them. They can swallow them in one full swoop. I have seen it with my own eyes. They will also raid a birds nest of its eggs.
We are obligated to eradicate them as they have nearly wiped out the Chameleon population, a species that IS native to Florida. You want to see something truly beautiful, watch a chameleon change from bright green to red to brown. Even better, look at a salamander that is black, blue, purple etc. THAT is beauty.
As for enjoying them sunning themselves, ALL lizards do that to SURVIVE. Notice how the cold wiped out the smaller lizard populations but it didn't effect the curly tails at all.
I will continue to get rid of them because I am a native of Florida and actually care about our reptillian friends. I save snakes, birds, skinks, turtles on a weekly basis since we live near the water. It's my duty as well as to educate the misinformed, such as yourself.
No I have not noticed how the cold wiped out all the small lizards. My yard is TEEMING with them. More so than any other year as a matter of fact. I love them, they are all over my yard and some come in my house and I rescue them and throw them out, lol. I was surprised myself. I thought they would have died. But I guess they or their eggs were buried deep in the ground during the cold. I really do have tons of them, and all different kinds. And I have only a "few" curley tail. I will keep u posted to let u know if they start disappearing. I think also that pestacides peeps use in their yards are killing them also. I have never used pestacides in all my 17 years of living in this home in FL. That could be a good reason why I have tons of them.
ronnie

Pompano Beach, FL

#40 Aug 8, 2010
I live in Coconut Creek with a bird refuge behind my house. I was concerned when I didn't see any lizards this year but I thought that after the cold winter, their population might be a bit diminshed.
Next, there are no Egrets who eat the lizards. Next the bug population has exploded. These things (and I do mean things) are aggresive and very nasty) They are carnivores. They ate all our lizards. They're nasty
BUT, not as nasty as me.
We need to band together to combat this. I miss my lizards.

Since: Jul 10

Metuchen, NJ

#42 Aug 10, 2010
ronnie wrote:
I live in Coconut Creek with a bird refuge behind my house. I was concerned when I didn't see any lizards this year but I thought that after the cold winter, their population might be a bit diminshed.
Next, there are no Egrets who eat the lizards. Next the bug population has exploded. These things (and I do mean things) are aggresive and very nasty) They are carnivores. They ate all our lizards. They're nasty
BUT, not as nasty as me.
We need to band together to combat this. I miss my lizards.
Did you read my post? I have zillions, well almost, of lizards in my yard. And no insects are eating them and what insects eat lizards anyway?

“BILLARY 2016 ”

Since: Aug 07

Location hidden

#43 Aug 11, 2010
ronnie wrote:
I live in Coconut Creek with a bird refuge behind my house. I was concerned when I didn't see any lizards this year but I thought that after the cold winter, their population might be a bit diminshed.
Next, there are no Egrets who eat the lizards. Next the bug population has exploded. These things (and I do mean things) are aggresive and very nasty) They are carnivores. They ate all our lizards. They're nasty
BUT, not as nasty as me.
We need to band together to combat this. I miss my lizards.
After the cold tapered off, it took a while to see the lizards but many have come back, not all, but many and now there are tons of babies which means they weren't wiped out, but many species did not survive. There are far fewer chameleons but that can be attributed to the nasty curly tails. Chameleons are slow moving and not aggressive, while curly tails are and pray on them and lizards. I will continue to eradicate them, in fact, there is only one left that I haven't caught but I will.

I have to correct you. Egrets DO eat lizards. I have one that walks down the waterway behind our house regularly and he plucks them right out of the the high grass. He swallows them while they are still wiggling. It's gross but part of the circle of life.
kayla

Boca Raton, FL

#44 Aug 11, 2010
I read that the curly tail lizards are native to Haiti and other Caribbean islands, and actually came here with the influx of illegal boat immigrants who accidently took them with them on their voyages to our shores. I guess they also hopped aboard legal cruise ships, too, and gained entry that way as well. I don't know if that's true or not, but recently I opened a package that was sent to my office from India, and found a few non-native live insects (which I killed) along for the quick ride. Is anything NOT global these days???
ningjya

United States

#45 Aug 23, 2010
I decided I would kill curlytails with a blowdart and haven't seen a isngle one since. Nervous, de-tailed brown anoles are showing themselves and their groovy throatware. Wish I could see a green anole
Kill the Kurlytails

Palm Beach Gardens, FL

#46 Aug 23, 2010
Man are they out today !! Killed 8 and left the dead ones laying there so the others know it's coming !!

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Boca Raton Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Boca woman sues UF fraternity brothers for secr... (Jul '08) 4 hr Misty Campus 361
Palm Beach Libertarians voice their support for... Tue OrlandoChris 1
crimestoppers Tue Bcb 1
Review: G8 Van Lines Oct 19 Jessie Ruiz 4
Boca's Kelsey Cooper Charged With DUI Manslaughter Oct 18 Saint Anger 2
Review: Travel Options Inc (Sep '11) Oct 18 maria 123
Delray Beach to consider tighter control of hal... (Apr '09) Oct 16 Duey 35
Boca Raton Dating
Find my Match

Boca Raton Jobs

Boca Raton People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Boca Raton News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Boca Raton

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]