Blytheville man dies after tire explodes

Blytheville man dies after tire explodes

There are 39 comments on the www.fox16.com story from Dec 31, 2007, titled Blytheville man dies after tire explodes. In it, www.fox16.com reports that:

A Blytheville man has died after the tire he tried to fix at work exploded, causing massive injuries to his head.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at www.fox16.com.

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Muddy waters

Rolla, MO

#1 Dec 31, 2007
That is to bad I bet the tire had some of that quick fix spray in it. It coats the tire inside and also the fluids are kept in the tire. May God bless.
MW

“生命是死亡”

Since: Jul 07

Beebe, AR

#2 Dec 31, 2007
Not quite, Muddy. That tire was an approximately 6' tall, 2' thick tire that was the rear right inside dual tire on an 85ton dump truck holding 85-90psi. When one blows it has the force of a stick of dynamite or better. He was standing extremely close when it blew out, while getting ready to plug it, and the majority of the force of it blowing out caught him in the upper chest/head area.

You DON'T use fix-a-flat in them, BTW.

We work in a very dangerous environment and even something that seems common (like a tire) to most people takes on possibly lethal proportions given the size of the equipment we operate and repair. It's truly sad that something like this happens to make us realize that fact even more.

“It is what it is”

Since: Oct 07

Blytheville

#3 Dec 31, 2007
More than likely, since the tire needed to be plugged it had been run low and it broke down the wires in the sidewall of the tire. So when he was airing the tire back up to full capacity, and they can go up to 110 psi, but it creates pressure where the weak cords (wires) are that is where it blows. I am not sure how they do it on a tire that size because my experience in dealing with them are minimum, but in a semitruck tire, they have air cages and when they air it up it contains the tire and reduces injury. There is not a sure fire way of telling if a tire has been run underinflated, but a more experienced person would know to look for a bulge and they also start to make a zipper sound before they blow. Sometimes you can look on the outside and see if there is a dirt mark on the sidewall where it had been run, but sometimes things just happen. I feel bad for his family, and he was so young!!
Pallida Mors wrote:
Not quite, Muddy. That tire was an approximately 6' tall, 2' thick tire that was the rear right inside dual tire on an 85ton dump truck holding 85-90psi. When one blows it has the force of a stick of dynamite or better. He was standing extremely close when it blew out, while getting ready to plug it, and the majority of the force of it blowing out caught him in the upper chest/head area.
You DON'T use fix-a-flat in them, BTW.
We work in a very dangerous environment and even something that seems common (like a tire) to most people takes on possibly lethal proportions given the size of the equipment we operate and repair. It's truly sad that something like this happens to make us realize that fact even more.

“生命是死亡”

Since: Jul 07

Beebe, AR

#4 Jan 1, 2008
There's no such thing as a tire cage for the size tires ran on the really heavy equipment at Hickman.

The tire he was going to plug was still on the truck - I saw a photo of the tire today. I was working when it happened, but I don't work for MTA (Kinder-Morgan). I was watching the helicopter land and take off 5:30-6:00pm though.

I was told - and I say that because it is second hand knowledge and I'm not 100% sure of the validity of it - that he had the air hose on it, airing it up, before he was going to plug it. As far as I can tell, he didn't do anything that either one of us, Raben Tire or Southern Tire Mart hasn't done a hundred times before. It was just a sad accident. It was the inside dual on the right rear, so even if if had been ran low and so long as it didn't have a heavy load on it, it goes about 50/50 as to whether or not the bead broke. I only time I ever had one do that and it had been sitting flat for a couple of days before being moved.

YEs, it was a tragedy - especially with him being so young and not having a chance to live his life to full measure. It's a sad reminder to those of us working with this equipment as to what might one day happen to us and to be careful around it.
And Blytheville is What wrote:
More than likely, since the tire needed to be plugged it had been run low and it broke down the wires in the sidewall of the tire. So when he was airing the tire back up to full capacity, and they can go up to 110 psi, but it creates pressure where the weak cords (wires) are that is where it blows. I am not sure how they do it on a tire that size because my experience in dealing with them are minimum, but in a semitruck tire, they have air cages and when they air it up it contains the tire and reduces injury. There is not a sure fire way of telling if a tire has been run underinflated, but a more experienced person would know to look for a bulge and they also start to make a zipper sound before they blow. Sometimes you can look on the outside and see if there is a dirt mark on the sidewall where it had been run, but sometimes things just happen. I feel bad for his family, and he was so young!! <quoted text>

“It is what it is”

Since: Oct 07

Blytheville

#5 Jan 1, 2008
You are so right. It is sad. Tires of that magnitude are so dangerous! I am glad I don't have to deal with them. But you are right it serves as a reminder of what can and does happen, and how short life really is.:(

PS. Thanks for the tire info! Knowledge is power!
Pallida Mors wrote:
There's no such thing as a tire cage for the size tires ran on the really heavy equipment at Hickman.
The tire he was going to plug was still on the truck - I saw a photo of the tire today. I was working when it happened, but I don't work for MTA (Kinder-Morgan). I was watching the helicopter land and take off 5:30-6:00pm though.
I was told - and I say that because it is second hand knowledge and I'm not 100% sure of the validity of it - that he had the air hose on it, airing it up, before he was going to plug it. As far as I can tell, he didn't do anything that either one of us, Raben Tire or Southern Tire Mart hasn't done a hundred times before. It was just a sad accident. It was the inside dual on the right rear, so even if if had been ran low and so long as it didn't have a heavy load on it, it goes about 50/50 as to whether or not the bead broke. I only time I ever had one do that and it had been sitting flat for a couple of days before being moved.
YEs, it was a tragedy - especially with him being so young and not having a chance to live his life to full measure. It's a sad reminder to those of us working with this equipment as to what might one day happen to us and to be careful around it.
<quoted text>
tractor

United States

#6 Jan 1, 2008
The tire cage is to keep the locking ring on the two part wheel from becoming a deadly missile if it does not seat properly when the tire is being inflated. Ever saw one with the bars bulging out? Someones life was saved by that cage. A farm tractor tire can cause a dangerous explosion, and they have a minimal pounds of air pressure.

“It is what it is”

Since: Oct 07

Blytheville

#7 Jan 1, 2008
How many people actually use the 2 piece wheels anymore? I agree about the cage....
tractor wrote:
The tire cage is to keep the locking ring on the two part wheel from becoming a deadly missile if it does not seat properly when the tire is being inflated. Ever saw one with the bars bulging out? Someones life was saved by that cage. A farm tractor tire can cause a dangerous explosion, and they have a minimal pounds of air pressure.

“生命是死亡”

Since: Jul 07

Beebe, AR

#8 Jan 1, 2008
Yes, and with those who change tractor or semi tires it is very effective. However, there is nothing like that for the size tires that we use around the mill on the REALLY large equipment. If there were such a thing, it would be too large and heavy to be portable enough for what is needed.

With this accident, it wasn't the the ring, it was just the tire itself blowing out. The tire was still mounted on the inside right dual when it blew. The truck, unloaded, weights in at about 120,000 pounds give or take.
tractor wrote:
The tire cage is to keep the locking ring on the two part wheel from becoming a deadly missile if it does not seat properly when the tire is being inflated. Ever saw one with the bars bulging out? Someones life was saved by that cage. A farm tractor tire can cause a dangerous explosion, and they have a minimal pounds of air pressure.
C U LATER

United States

#9 Jan 1, 2008
?
I M Pagan

United States

#10 Jan 1, 2008
Dear C U Later,

Let me clear it up for you.

The proper sign off is not 'C U Later',
it is 'C U L 8 R'.

Just glad I could help with your education.

I M P
guest

United States

#11 Jan 1, 2008
I M Pagan wrote:
Dear C U Later,
Let me clear it up for you.
The proper sign off is not 'C U Later',
it is 'C U L 8 R'.
Just glad I could help with your education.
I M P
Hey I don't think that person needs help
Mr. Im Pagan. I think you do!
Purebreed

United States

#12 Jan 1, 2008
This family is still in our prayers.
tractor

Alexander, AR

#13 Jan 1, 2008
The cage is not to protect from blowouts, but for safety against rim and wheel separation, which is deadly in itself. Any spoke wheel you see on a truck or trailer is the old Dayton two piecer. An air pressure explosion is like any other, the concussion and shock wave can be deadly.The bigger the tire, the more air volume, the more dangerous it is.I guess there is no real protection from blowouts, except to be properly trained not to cause the blowout by overinflating.. (which is the cause of many tractor tire explosions).
tractor

Alexander, AR

#14 Jan 1, 2008
I just read a statement by the Saskatchewan/Canada Occupational Health And Safety Division that a 20inch tire inflated to 100psi could generate 40,000 pounds of explosive force.
x employee

Kennett, MO

#15 Jan 1, 2008
THIS COMPANY IS TO CHEAP TO BUY NEW TIRES FOR THESE KMATOZOO TRUCKS IT TAKES cHRIS GETTING KILLED BEFORE 5 MILLIOM DOLLAR COMPANY WILL REPLACE A $ 1200.00 TIRE i HOPE THIS FAMILY
GET TO GET PAID FOR THIS HE WAS ONLY 10 YEARS OLD
THIS YOUNG MAN WILL TRULEY BE MISSED God Bless
THIS Fmily. the sadest part the money can't bring him back

“It is what it is”

Since: Oct 07

Blytheville

#16 Jan 2, 2008
That is more like a 12K tire not 1200.00 but money should have not been an issue. SAFETY FIRST!!
x employee wrote:
THIS COMPANY IS TO CHEAP TO BUY NEW TIRES FOR THESE KMATOZOO TRUCKS IT TAKES cHRIS GETTING KILLED BEFORE 5 MILLIOM DOLLAR COMPANY WILL REPLACE A $ 1200.00 TIRE i HOPE THIS FAMILY
GET TO GET PAID FOR THIS HE WAS ONLY 10 YEARS OLD
THIS YOUNG MAN WILL TRULEY BE MISSED God Bless
THIS Fmily. the sadest part the money can't bring him back
sad

Red Bud, IL

#17 Jan 2, 2008
My prayers go out to this young mans family.It is so sad to hear.
Extire company employee

Saint Louis, MO

#18 Jan 2, 2008
There are classes to train people on the proper ways to repair tires of this size. I know Raben has a set guidelines to train thier employees.ITRA sounds to me like and I do not know how it went down, but if the young man was PLUGGING a tire then airing it up he made a bad mistake. Training I have had in the past states any ran less than 80% of its original air pressure must be deflated and checked patched from the inside. I personally witnessed a man get fired from Raben for just merely putting air in a tire that had been ran low on a forklift. Which done the exact same thing as this one did. Only his was a fatality. So I geuss what I am saying here is either the company did not want to pay to have someone repair it properly, or the young man just did not know any better. Lack of SAFETY!!! Company and Employee.

Since: Dec 07

North Little Rock, AR

#19 Jan 2, 2008
accidents are exactly that...accidents. christopher is my nephew. he is a very good person and his father (my brother) Jackie is holding up stronge. Chis will be missed terribly by many but we will never forget him
guest

Chesterfield, MO

#20 Jan 2, 2008
He was not adding air to the tire. He was preparing to plug it. He had not even stuck the plug into the tire when it happend. I have never seen a tire blow out in which the way this one blew out. And I have seen a lot them blow out. I guess it was like someone said earlier, the tire was going flat, so being underinflated it must have got hot and had no where to go but out. But the thing is he never touched the tire yet, it just blew as he was preparing to plug it. It just dont make any sense. My heart and prayers go out to his family. This was a great young man and Im a better person for being able to know him. He had respect for everyone. He treated people the way he wanted to be treated. Just an outstanding person. Please Pray for his family.

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