Whats up with the Da's: Charges on Pe...

Whats up with the Da's: Charges on People that have not committed crimes

Posted in the Blairsville Forum

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Acts

Cleveland, GA

#1 Aug 25, 2013
Its totally unbelievable the number of those this is happening to.. what in the heck is going on with that bunch..
U R NUTS

Athens, GA

#2 Aug 25, 2013
Maybe you might give some insight as you that of which you speak.

The circuit. The DA. Blairsville or Cleveland.
I wanna know

Decatur, GA

#3 Aug 26, 2013
Acts wrote:
Its totally unbelievable the number of those this is happening to.. what in the heck is going on with that bunch..
Please provide the world with your continual eyewitness accounts of those who you believe are being falsely accused.

Since: Dec 10

Location hidden

#4 Aug 26, 2013
Our DA is busy going after people with less than 1 oz of pot and covering up the bigger crimes that are happening right under his nose.
Welcome to Union County

Dahlonega, GA

#5 Aug 26, 2013
It's been going on for years. All you have to do is go in and accuse someone of something and they issue warrants, give temp custody and so on. Their attitude is you can beat the rap but not the ride! People ought to be charged when making false accusations as well.
froggy

Ashburn, VA

#6 Aug 26, 2013
Look back to your esteemed sheriff on this matter. The sheriff makes the arrest and the DA decides whether or not to file and proceed with prosecution.
Just a thought

Alto, GA

#7 Aug 26, 2013
The DA comes up for reelection next year. Maybe we will have a choice this time around.
Informed Opinion

United States

#8 Aug 26, 2013
Welcome to Union County wrote:
It's been going on for years. All you have to do is go in and accuse someone of something and they issue warrants, give temp custody and so on. Their attitude is you can beat the rap but not the ride! People ought to be charged when making false accusations as well.
It pains me to say it, but you do have a point.

I started in law enforcement in an agency that was too busy to arrest and process people in cases where there was no chance of a conviction - so you learned how to solve problems without necessarily arresting people.

You were truly a "Peace Officer."

We used to give "One-Time" drunks rides home instead of DUIs so they keep their jobs and homes and their kids wouldn't suffer; and when a husband pushed a wife, or the wife threw a pan at the husband, one of them would spend the night with a friend. Most of the time, it worked well.

People respected us because they knew if we took them to jail it was only because they gave us no alternative, so even the people we arrested usually were friendly and even helpful after the event. One night a guy I had arrested for domestic battery fought like hell to protect my butt at a bar fight.

Later, as law enforcement became more about budgets and staffing, LEOs started arresting everyone to generate statistics, under the theory that nobody ever cared if your arrests led to convictions - the stats looked good, the budget needed increased, and everyone was a happy camper.

The good cops fought it, and is always made us angry to see how we screwed up people's lives forever by arresting them and putting them in a system designed to take their money and leave them and their families in a far worse position than before the squad car pulled up.

Now, we send the people into the system to be bled out, then wonder why when they emerge unemployed, scheduled for 27 "schools", with no driver's license, and a criminal record, in a depressed economy, they can't find work to support their families.

Just my take on it.

Since: Feb 12

Location hidden

#9 Aug 26, 2013
Informed Opinion wrote:
<quoted text>It pains me to say it, but you do have a point.

I started in law enforcement in an agency that was too busy to arrest and process people in cases where there was no chance of a conviction - so you learned how to solve problems without necessarily arresting people.

You were truly a "Peace Officer."

We used to give "One-Time" drunks rides home instead of DUIs so they keep their jobs and homes and their kids wouldn't suffer; and when a husband pushed a wife, or the wife threw a pan at the husband, one of them would spend the night with a friend. Most of the time, it worked well.

People respected us because they knew if we took them to jail it was only because they gave us no alternative, so even the people we arrested usually were friendly and even helpful after the event. One night a guy I had arrested for domestic battery fought like hell to protect my butt at a bar fight.

Later, as law enforcement became more about budgets and staffing, LEOs started arresting everyone to generate statistics, under the theory that nobody ever cared if your arrests led to convictions - the stats looked good, the budget needed increased, and everyone was a happy camper.

The good cops fought it, and is always made us angry to see how we screwed up people's lives forever by arresting them and putting them in a system designed to take their money and leave them and their families in a far worse position than before the squad car pulled up.

Now, we send the people into the system to be bled out, then wonder why when they emerge unemployed, scheduled for 27 "schools", with no driver's license, and a criminal record, in a depressed economy, they can't find work to support their families.

Just my take on it.
Well said! I, too, have see this happening during my career.
Just Mike

Clarkesville, GA

#10 Aug 26, 2013
Informed Opinion wrote:
<quoted text>Now, we send the people into the system to be bled out, then wonder why when they emerge unemployed, scheduled for 27 "schools", with no driver's license, and a criminal record, in a depressed economy, they can't find work to support their families.
I second the other post... very well said, and so very SAD. Thanks to you for all the GOOD PEOPLE'S lives you didn't destroy!

Since: Dec 10

Location hidden

#11 Aug 26, 2013
Informed Opinion wrote:
<quoted text>
It pains me to say it, but you do have a point.
I started in law enforcement in an agency that was too busy to arrest and process people in cases where there was no chance of a conviction - so you learned how to solve problems without necessarily arresting people.
You were truly a "Peace Officer."
We used to give "One-Time" drunks rides home instead of DUIs so they keep their jobs and homes and their kids wouldn't suffer; and when a husband pushed a wife, or the wife threw a pan at the husband, one of them would spend the night with a friend. Most of the time, it worked well.
People respected us because they knew if we took them to jail it was only because they gave us no alternative, so even the people we arrested usually were friendly and even helpful after the event. One night a guy I had arrested for domestic battery fought like hell to protect my butt at a bar fight.
Later, as law enforcement became more about budgets and staffing, LEOs started arresting everyone to generate statistics, under the theory that nobody ever cared if your arrests led to convictions - the stats looked good, the budget needed increased, and everyone was a happy camper.
The good cops fought it, and is always made us angry to see how we screwed up people's lives forever by arresting them and putting them in a system designed to take their money and leave them and their families in a far worse position than before the squad car pulled up.
Now, we send the people into the system to be bled out, then wonder why when they emerge unemployed, scheduled for 27 "schools", with no driver's license, and a criminal record, in a depressed economy, they can't find work to support their families.
Just my take on it.
Thank you for your service, and you are right on the money with everything you said.

The people are bled dry for the things they mandate and the person is left with so much debt.

The system is ruining families. Lawyers and judges are getting to be worse than the crooks.

I know someone that did not pay a ticket for running a stop sign.
Yes, they should have paid the ticket. But by the time they were finished with this person they took their license. How do you pay your fines if you can't get to work?

White collar crimes need to be punished. What these people do also ruin people lives. These crimes destroy and bankrupt communities.

They can try to cover up the crimes but eventually the money taken will be found out. Look at what happened in Towns and Lumpkin Counties. Perfect example. We are going down the same path real fast if we don't stop it NOW!
wonderfulpost

Dawsonville, GA

#12 Aug 26, 2013
Informed Opinion wrote:
<quoted text>
It pains me to say it, but you do have a point.
I started in law enforcement in an agency that was too busy to arrest and process people in cases where there was no chance of a conviction - so you learned how to solve problems without necessarily arresting people.
You were truly a "Peace Officer."
We used to give "One-Time" drunks rides home instead of DUIs so they keep their jobs and homes and their kids wouldn't suffer; and when a husband pushed a wife, or the wife threw a pan at the husband, one of them would spend the night with a friend. Most of the time, it worked well.
People respected us because they knew if we took them to jail it was only because they gave us no alternative, so even the people we arrested usually were friendly and even helpful after the event. One night a guy I had arrested for domestic battery fought like hell to protect my butt at a bar fight.
Later, as law enforcement became more about budgets and staffing, LEOs started arresting everyone to generate statistics, under the theory that nobody ever cared if your arrests led to convictions - the stats looked good, the budget needed increased, and everyone was a happy camper.
The good cops fought it, and is always made us angry to see how we screwed up people's lives forever by arresting them and putting them in a system designed to take their money and leave them and their families in a far worse position than before the squad car pulled up.
Now, we send the people into the system to be bled out, then wonder why when they emerge unemployed, scheduled for 27 "schools", with no driver's license, and a criminal record, in a depressed economy, they can't find work to support their families.
Just my take on it.
Wonderful post and I agree 1000%!!
UC Voter

Dawsonville, GA

#13 Aug 26, 2013
Retired LE, too.

LE calls it "bread and butter."
UC Voter

Dawsonville, GA

#14 Aug 26, 2013
ACOG wrote:
<quoted text>
I know someone that did not pay a ticket for running a stop sign.
Yes, they should have paid the ticket. But by the time they were finished with this person they took their license. How do you pay your fines if you can't get to work?
That's just irresponsible not paying a small fine for running a stop sign. The person ruined their own life.
U R NUTS

Athens, GA

#15 Aug 26, 2013
Informed Opinion wrote:
<quoted text>
It pains me to say it, but you do have a point.
I started in law enforcement in an agency that was too busy to arrest and process people in cases where there was no chance of a conviction - so you learned how to solve problems without necessarily arresting people.
You were truly a "Peace Officer."
We used to give "One-Time" drunks rides home instead of DUIs so they keep their jobs and homes and their kids wouldn't suffer; and when a husband pushed a wife, or the wife threw a pan at the husband, one of them would spend the night with a friend. Most of the time, it worked well.
People respected us because they knew if we took them to jail it was only because they gave us no alternative, so even the people we arrested usually were friendly and even helpful after the event. One night a guy I had arrested for domestic battery fought like hell to protect my butt at a bar fight.
Later, as law enforcement became more about budgets and staffing, LEOs started arresting everyone to generate statistics, under the theory that nobody ever cared if your arrests led to convictions - the stats looked good, the budget needed increased, and everyone was a happy camper.
The good cops fought it, and is always made us angry to see how we screwed up people's lives forever by arresting them and putting them in a system designed to take their money and leave them and their families in a far worse position than before the squad car pulled up.
Now, we send the people into the system to be bled out, then wonder why when they emerge unemployed, scheduled for 27 "schools", with no driver's license, and a criminal record, in a depressed economy, they can't find work to support their families.
Just my take on it.
Amazing.

We are almost in total agreement.

I have witnessed the same transition. LE from friend to foe. Isnít it a shame?
U R NUTS

Athens, GA

#16 Aug 26, 2013
Generally, I think I am happy with the new Sheriff comparatively speaking, although we are all aware that the jury (so to speak) is still out.

To me our problems, now, stem more for the judicial system itself, as one posting here seemed to suggest.

I believe the D.A. is up next year 2014. And the Judges, although almost never opposed, should never be endorsed by a positive vote, as they appear to feel invulnerable.

Just rambling, I sure some will enlighten me.

Since: Dec 10

Location hidden

#17 Aug 26, 2013
UC Voter wrote:
<quoted text>
That's just irresponsible not paying a small fine for running a stop sign. The person ruined their own life.
Yes, it is irresponsible. BUT what I did not mention is this person had lost their job of 8 years due to down sizing and was about to lose everything they had. Losing their license only made things worse. Times are hard and it is happening all around us. Some people in this community are so rapped up playing golf and playing cowboys that they are to busy to care about what is happening to the rest of the people in the community.

I happen to care about these people, that is why I fight so hard.

People that can hardly put food on the table do not care about 8 million dollar club houses,$575,000 covered horse arena and million dollar farmers markets, 4 million dollar gyms that they are HAVING to PAY TAXES FOR.
UC Voter

Dawsonville, GA

#18 Aug 26, 2013
ACOG wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, it is irresponsible. BUT what I did not mention is this person had lost their job of 8 years due to down sizing and was about to lose everything they had. Losing their license only made things worse. Times are hard and it is happening all around us. Some people in this community are so rapped up playing golf and playing cowboys that they are to busy to care about what is happening to the rest of the people in the community.
I happen to care about these people, that is why I fight so hard.
People that can hardly put food on the table do not care about 8 million dollar club houses,$575,000 covered horse arena and million dollar farmers markets, 4 million dollar gyms that they are HAVING to PAY TAXES FOR.
Why didn't you pay the little fine for running a stop sign if you care so much? Sorry, this excuse doesn't fly. First, it is careless to run a stop sign. Second, the fine in small and could be paid in payments if there is a hardship.
No excuse.
UC Voter

Dawsonville, GA

#19 Aug 26, 2013
U R NUTS wrote:
Generally, I think I am happy with the new Sheriff comparatively speaking, although we are all aware that the jury (so to speak) is still out.
To me our problems, now, stem more for the judicial system itself, as one posting here seemed to suggest.
I believe the D.A. is up next year 2014. And the Judges, although almost never opposed, should never be endorsed by a positive vote, as they appear to feel invulnerable.
Just rambling, I sure some will enlighten me.
The new sheriff department seems to pay more attention to animal control than anything else. Yes, animal control is doing a splendid job. I commend Mike and Jeff, but what else have they accomplished. Nothing. Word on the street is there is no heat from the department on those manufacturing and selling drugs.
UC Voter

Dawsonville, GA

#20 Aug 26, 2013
ACOG wrote:
<quoted text>
I know someone that did not pay a ticket for running a stop sign.
Yes, they should have paid the ticket. But by the time they were finished with this person they took their license. How do you pay your fines if you can't get to work?
They lost their license because they had a moving violation with a fine of $150-350 depending on priors. Bet they lost their license because their insurance cancelled them and a person has to have vehicle insurance or not license.

Like I said, the courts will allow payments if a person has a hardship. Just gotta ask the judge.

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