Gram Parsons - Poet of Americana

Gram Parsons - Poet of Americana

Posted in the Bibb City Forum

“Shadowville All-Stars”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#1 Feb 1, 2013
Almost perfect song in both sound and vision... Gram Parsons leaving us early was such a loss. And look how he literally sets Emmylou on fire:

“Shadowville All-Stars”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#3 Feb 2, 2013
Didnt he write wrote:
Didn't he write the song SHORT PEOPLE or was that Zevon Warrens?
You're thinking of Mac Davis, maybe?

--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & The Shadowville All-Stars:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery

“Way down, in Columbus Georgia”

Since: Mar 10

Location hidden

#4 Feb 2, 2013
Will Dockery wrote:
Almost perfect song in both sound and vision... Gram Parsons leaving us early was such a loss. And look how he literally sets Emmylou on fire:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =6koAGZYyL_wXX
Lord Will, I haven't heard Gram's name mentioned in years, I was friends with Gram many years ago, I knew his momma Avis too.
I would have never thought you would have thought too much of his style of music but I guess you never know.
Its kind of funny that when he was still alive not too many people though that much of him or his music really but years after his death he's sorta taken on an iconic status.
My father had business dealings with his mother father in the orange juice business and we spent a few summers together as kids and teenagers. The boy could sing that's for sure.
My favorite song he did wasn't written by him but he sang it in the flying burrito brothers, here is a link to the video if you want to see it.
http://youtu.be/0rrqBsG1yXs
I have seen many of my friends pass on in my life but Gram didn't have to die, if he only would of let go of the drugs.
He tried to live the life of a rock star but had the constitution of a country boy which he was and it killed him.
Maybe one day we can meet at the Starbucks and I'll show you my pictures.
Oh, speaking of Enmmy Lou, you may want to listen to the song she wrote and sang, Boulder to Birmingham, she wrote that about Gram dying. Its a powerful song.

“Shadowville All-Stars”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#5 Feb 2, 2013
Jim R Pickens wrote:
<quoted text>
Lord Will, I haven't heard Gram's name mentioned in years, I was friends with Gram many years ago, I knew his momma Avis too.
I would have never thought you would have thought too much of his style of music but I guess you never know.
Its kind of funny that when he was still alive not too many people though that much of him or his music really but years after his death he's sorta taken on an iconic status.
My father had business dealings with his mother father in the orange juice business and we spent a few summers together as kids and teenagers. The boy could sing that's for sure.
My favorite song he did wasn't written by him but he sang it in the flying burrito brothers, here is a link to the video if you want to see it.
http://youtu.be/0rrqBsG1yXs
I have seen many of my friends pass on in my life but Gram didn't have to die, if he only would of let go of the drugs.
He tried to live the life of a rock star but had the constitution of a country boy which he was and it killed him.
Maybe one day we can meet at the Starbucks and I'll show you my pictures.
Oh, speaking of Enmmy Lou, you may want to listen to the song she wrote and sang, Boulder to Birmingham, she wrote that about Gram dying. Its a powerful song.
Great remembrance of Gram Parsons, Jim... and I tip my hat to you.

“Shadowville All-Stars”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#8 Feb 3, 2013
Were they lovers wrote:
Now the question WERE THEY LOVERS
Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris, it seems pretty likely.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gram_Parsons

"...He returned to the US for a one-off concert with the Burritos, and at Hillman's instigation went to hear Emmylou Harris sing in a small club in Washington, D.C. They became friends and, within a year, he asked her to join him in Los Angeles for another attempt to record his first solo album.

Having gained thirty pounds since his Burrito days from Southern food and excessive alcohol consumption, it came as a surprise to many when Parsons was enthusiastically signed to Reprise Records by Mo Ostin in mid-1972. GP, released in 1973, used the guitar-playing of James Burton (sideman to Elvis Presley and Ricky Nelson), and featured new songs from a creatively revitalized Parsons such as "Big Mouth Blues" and "Kiss the Children," as well as a cover of Tompall Glaser's "Streets of Baltimore".

Parsons, by now featuring Harris as his duet partner, played dates across the United States as Gram Parsons and the Fallen Angels. Unable to afford the services of the Elvis band for a month, the band featured the talents of obscure Colorado-based rock guitarist Jock Bartley (soon to skyrocket to fame with Firefall), veteran Nashville sideman Neil Flanz on pedal steel, Kyle Tullis on bass and former Mountain drummer N.D. Smart (once described by Canadian folksinger Ian Tyson as "a psychotic redneck"). The touring party also included Gretchen Parsons—by this point extremely envious of Harris—and Harris' young daughter..."

--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery

“Shadowville All-Stars”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#9 Feb 3, 2013
Mispelling wrote:
Its is GRAHAM PARSON fool. GRAHAM not GRAM. Get your spelling correct befor riting here on the Forum. We expet literalcy on here. This is a reel Forum.
No, it really is Gram Parsons, his stage name:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gram_Parsons

"...Parsons was born Ingram Cecil Connor III on November 5, 1946, in Winter Haven, Florida, to Ingram Cecil ("Coon Dog") and Avis (née Snively) Connor.[4] The Connors normally resided at their main residence in Waycross, Georgia, but Avis traveled to her hometown in Florida to give birth.[4] She was the daughter of citrus fruit magnate John A. Snively, who held extensive properties both in Winter Haven and in Waycross; Parsons' father was a famous World War II flying ace, decorated with the Air Medal, who was present at the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.[5] Biographer David Meyer characterized Coon Dog and Avis as loving parents: he writes in Twenty Thousand Roads that they are "remembered as affectionate parents and a loving couple".[4] He also notes, however, that "unhappiness was eating away at the Connor family": Avis suffered from depression, and both parents were alcoholics.[6] Coon Dog committed suicide two days before Christmas Day, 1958, devastating the young Gram and the rest of the Connor family.[7] Avis subsequently married Robert Parsons, whose surname was adopted by Ingram (henceforth he would be known as Gram Parsons)."

"...Gram Parsons (November 5, 1946 – September 19, 1973) was an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and pianist. Parsons is best known for his work within the country genre; he also mixed blues, folk, and rock to create what he called "Cosmic American Music".[1] Besides recording as a solo artist, he also worked in several notable bands, including the International Submarine Band, The Byrds, and The Flying Burrito Brothers. His career, though short, is described by Allmusic as "enormously influential" for both country and rock, "blending the two genres to the point that they became indistinguishable from each other."[2]

Born in 1946, Parsons emerged from a wealthy but troubled childhood to attend Harvard University. He founded the International Submarine Band in 1966, and after several months of delay their debut, Safe at Home, was released in 1968, by which time the group had disbanded. Parsons joined The Byrds in early 1968, and played a pivotal role in the making of the seminal Sweetheart of the Rodeo album. After leaving the group in late 1968, Parsons and fellow Byrd Chris Hillman formed The Flying Burrito Brothers in 1969, releasing their debut, The Gilded Palace of Sin, the same year. The album was well received but failed commercially; after a sloppy cross-country tour, they hastily recorded Burrito Deluxe. Parsons was fired from the band before its release in early 1970. He soon signed with A&M Records, but after several unproductive sessions he canceled his intended solo debut in early 1971. Parsons moved to France, where he lived for a short period at Villa Nellcôte with his friend Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones. Returning to America, Parsons befriended Emmylou Harris, who assisted him on vocals for his first solo record, GP, released in 1973. Although it received enthusiastic reviews, the release failed to chart; his next album, Grievous Angel (released posthumously in 1974) met with a similar reception, and peaked at number 195 on Billboard. Parsons died of a drug overdose on September 19, 1973 in hotel room 8 at the Joshua Tree Inn at Joshua Tree, California, at the age of 26.

Since his death, Parsons has been recognized as an extremely influential artist, credited with helping to found both country rock and alt-country.[2] His posthumous honors include the Americana Music Association "President's Award" for 2003, and a ranking at No. 87 on Rolling Stone's list of the "100 Greatest Artists of All Time."

--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery

“Shadowville All-Stars”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#11 Feb 3, 2013
Zack And Josh were right wrote:
Zack and Josh are right. They know what is best for you. Accept their love.
Remember, Josh Green named one musical act at Doo-Nanny which just theoir set alone was worth ten dollars admission.

Josh also states he is my "friend and fan".

Are you saying you agree with all this, then?

--
Will Dockery backed by The Conley Brothers:
http://youtu.be/v8_Yp-dIPCY

“Shadowville All-Stars”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#12 Apr 2, 2013
Almost perfect song in both sound and vision... Gram Parsons leaving us early was such a loss. And look how he literally sets Emmylou on fire:



Still utterly cool 40 years later!

“Shadowville All-Stars”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#13 May 10, 2013
Jim R Pickens wrote:
<quoted text>
Lord Will, I haven't heard Gram's name mentioned in years, I was friends with Gram many years ago, I knew his momma Avis too.
I would have never thought you would have thought too much of his style of music but I guess you never know.
Its kind of funny that when he was still alive not too many people though that much of him or his music really but years after his death he's sorta taken on an iconic status.
My father had business dealings with his mother father in the orange juice business and we spent a few summers together as kids and teenagers. The boy could sing that's for sure.
My favorite song he did wasn't written by him but he sang it in the flying burrito brothers, here is a link to the video if you want to see it.
http://youtu.be/0rrqBsG1yXs
I have seen many of my friends pass on in my life but Gram didn't have to die, if he only would of let go of the drugs.
He tried to live the life of a rock star but had the constitution of a country boy which he was and it killed him.
Maybe one day we can meet at the Starbucks and I'll show you my pictures.
Oh, speaking of Enmmy Lou, you may want to listen to the song she wrote and sang, Boulder to Birmingham, she wrote that about Gram dying. Its a powerful song.
Jim, this is what I was thinking of earlier when I suggested you write about Gram for a book... There's a market out there, as this review shows:

(Excerpted for example and informative purposes):

"...Saw "Fallen Angel: Gram Parsons" (2004) last night, after wanting to see
it for awhile. Well-made doc, though it was unavoidably handicapped by
the dire lack of archived Parsons footage. No video clips of him
speaking that I can recall, and one TV performance of "Hot Burrito #1"
(I was pleased to see this song presented as his masterpiece because,
oh, how I adore it) was pitifully reused over and over for insert filler.

I enjoyed the film much more than expected, however, because I had the
misimpression that it would be focused on contemporary acts talking
about his influence rather than a more straight, biographical approach.
So, I learned a few interesting details and enjoyed hearing from various
Parsons insiders. Chris Hillman, Pamela Des Barres and Emmylou Harris,
especially. Did Roger McGuinn refuse to participate?

I did think the film dwelled too much on the body-stealing controversy
-- there was a point where Parsons' death arrived in the narrative and I
thought, jeez, there are still 18 minutes of movie left to go?? If
nothing else, I would have nixed the reenactment scenes with Phil
Kaufman. Tacky.

Warning: "Fallen Angel" may make you a bit, well, pissed off at Parsons.
He really did blow it. Got himself booted out of two great bands...his
sloppy preparation for shows...of course, the drug use.... He squandered
an amazing gift. His sheer charisma alone was staggering
(
), before he turned dull-eyed
and bloated from self-abuse..."

-Poisoned Rose

“Way down, in Columbus Georgia”

Since: Mar 10

Location hidden

#14 May 10, 2013
Will Dockery wrote:
<quoted text>
Jim, this is what I was thinking of earlier when I suggested you write about Gram for a book... There's a market out there, as this review shows:
(Excerpted for example and informative purposes):
"...Saw "Fallen Angel: Gram Parsons" (2004) last night, after wanting to see
it for awhile. Well-made doc, though it was unavoidably handicapped by
the dire lack of archived Parsons footage. No video clips of him
speaking that I can recall, and one TV performance of "Hot Burrito #1"
(I was pleased to see this song presented as his masterpiece because,
oh, how I adore it) was pitifully reused over and over for insert filler.
I enjoyed the film much more than expected, however, because I had the
misimpression that it would be focused on contemporary acts talking
about his influence rather than a more straight, biographical approach.
So, I learned a few interesting details and enjoyed hearing from various
Parsons insiders. Chris Hillman, Pamela Des Barres and Emmylou Harris,
especially. Did Roger McGuinn refuse to participate?
I did think the film dwelled too much on the body-stealing controversy
-- there was a point where Parsons' death arrived in the narrative and I
thought, jeez, there are still 18 minutes of movie left to go?? If
nothing else, I would have nixed the reenactment scenes with Phil
Kaufman. Tacky.
Warning: "Fallen Angel" may make you a bit, well, pissed off at Parsons.
He really did blow it. Got himself booted out of two great bands...his
sloppy preparation for shows...of course, the drug use.... He squandered
an amazing gift. His sheer charisma alone was staggering
(http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=0rrqBsG1yXsXX), before he turned dull-eyed
and bloated from self-abuse..."
-Poisoned Rose
I noticed that's the the exact same link to the exact same youtube video I posted. My favorite.
Thanks for your input Will, but I knew Gram as teenagers (I am a few years older than he), when he left for college in the mid 60's we had very little contact after that as we both went our separate ways.
I am happy that his music is still popular but I agree with the comments from "poisoned rose" about him blowing it. I hope that those who look to him are inspired not to make the same mistakes but so many from every generation do.
I don't know if you know it or not but every year on Sept 19, the day Gram died, there is a festival in Waycross Georgia called the Gram Parsons Guitar Pull. I have attended on several occasions in the past and they are fun but some of it can be a little over the top. I don't go anymore because my wife doesn't like the festival atmosphere and we are really too old now,(was then too though).
From what I've read on here I think you would have a great time going indeed, I would highly recommend it.

“Shadowville All-Stars”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#15 May 10, 2013
Jim R Pickens wrote:
<quoted text>
I noticed that's the the exact same link to the exact same youtube video I posted. My favorite.
Thanks for your input Will, but I knew Gram as teenagers (I am a few years older than he), when he left for college in the mid 60's we had very little contact after that as we both went our separate ways.
I am happy that his music is still popular but I agree with the comments from "poisoned rose" about him blowing it. I hope that those who look to him are inspired not to make the same mistakes but so many from every generation do.
I don't know if you know it or not but every year on Sept 19, the day Gram died, there is a festival in Waycross Georgia called the Gram Parsons Guitar Pull. I have attended on several occasions in the past and they are fun but some of it can be a little over the top. I don't go anymore because my wife doesn't like the festival atmosphere and we are really too old now,(was then too though).
From what I've read on here I think you would have a great time going indeed, I would highly recommend it.
Thanks Jim, yes I've heard of the Gram Parsons day in Waycross, but never have managed to make it for one reason or another... maybe this year...

--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & The Shadowville All-Stars:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery

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