Word Watch: How To Pronounce Connecticut Words

Jun 12, 2008 Read more: Hartford Courant 9
New to Connecticut? Then it's time for a visit from the Word Guy's Welcome Wagon! We come to your home to furnish lists of local libraries, guides to area bookstores and advice on which word columnist to read - ... Read more
JS - Native of CT

West Hartford, CT

#1 Jun 13, 2008
Rob, THANK YOU! As one who has lived in sight of HIGH-bline Tower for almost 60 years, I am glad that someone else has taken up the pronunciation battle. You did miss one town worth mentioning. My friends from Nor-FORK prefer that pronunciation over the less attractive alternative.
Dan

Windsor, CT

#2 Jun 13, 2008
Nor-itch is in England. Nor-wich is in CT. Sorry. I disagree. And it is Buk-lee. My Uncle taught there for 25 years.
JS - Native of CT

West Hartford, CT

#3 Jun 13, 2008
There is also a Nor-itch in New York. Lived there for a bit. The bridge in Hartfurd is also BUK-lee.
Newington resident

Newington, CT

#4 Jun 13, 2008
Thank you! I've been hearing "Ber-LIN" and "NOO Ha-ven" more and more lately, even occasionally on radio and TV commercials, and it drives me nuts. It also makes me wonder who produced the commercials, given that they seem to know so little about the town they're promoting.
Jim from West Hartford

West Hartford, CT

#5 Jun 14, 2008
Agree with Dan that the Connecticut city is Norwich. I was born there, and have a stake in this. Norwich is not a town with affectations. If it were, the river would be the Tems (which everyone agrees it is not).
Joan Keating-McKeon

Hartford, CT

#6 Jun 23, 2008
This comment comes in response to your mentioning the New Britain phenomenon of "swallowing" that middle syllable when pronouncing the town's name. We linguists know this as the glottal stop feature wherein instead of producing a labio-dental "t" sound for "BriTain," the speaker raises the soft palate, bringing it up to produce a kind of "gulping" sound instead . What I find curious is that the glottal stop is no easier to effect than the actual production of the "T" sound; it has become more of a dialectal habit though. I hear this same kind of glottal stop locally in words like "kettle" or "little," and I find myself correcting students who have inadvertently picked up this poor articulation. It makes one sound uninformed when one resorts to this dialectal feature. As a poor pun on the soft palate connection, I find this pronunciation tendency quite unpalatable!
dennis mahan

Clover, SC

#7 Oct 11, 2013
what is a word in connecticutthat has a "x" in it?
dennis mahan

Clover, SC

#8 Oct 11, 2013
what is a word that is in connecticut that has "x" in it?

Sol

Since: Jan 08

Location hidden

#9 Nov 28, 2013
It's "Nooo BRIT'n" if you've had the misfortune to have been raised there.

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