James Baldwin, 72, Bentonville, Ark.

James Baldwin, 72, Bentonville, Ark.

There are 2 comments on the The Daily Freeman-Journal story from Nov 3, 2011, titled James Baldwin, 72, Bentonville, Ark.. In it, The Daily Freeman-Journal reports that:

James William Baldwin, age 72, of Bentonville, AR, passed away November 2, 2011 in Springdale.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Daily Freeman-Journal.

The Other James Baldwin

Hobart, Australia

#1 Nov 11, 2011
I am writing here about the famous writer--James Baldwin.-Ron in Tasmania
----------
BALDWIN and ME
MAKING IT UP AS WE WENT ALONG

In his first novel Go Tell It on the Mountain, published in 1953, American novelist, essayist, playwright, poet, and social critic, James Baldwin(1924-1987), wrote with intensity about the power of prayer and preaching. He wrote on behalf of an otherwise powerless community of which he was a part. It was a time, he wrote, filled with soaring possibilities in contrast to the bitter world outside. It was as though life’s very bitterness offered his congregation a unique insight into the suffering of Christ, a bitterness which made the congregation for that time of prayer and preaching a chosen people whose spiritual exaltation, in all its fiery rhetoric and colourful abandon, could never be experienced by white people. Baldwin matched this novel with an essay,“Down at the Cross,” published in 1962, in which he wrote about his own conversion as an adolescent filled with doubts and fears and ambitions and a sharp sense of exclusion:

“One moment I was on my feet, singing and clapping and, at the same time, working out in my head the plot of a play; the next moment, with no transition, no sensation of falling, I was on my back, with the lights beating down into my face and all the vertical saints above me.”–Ron Price with thanks to Colm Toibin,“James Baldwin & Barack Obama,” The New York Review of Books, 23 October 2008.

I was too young back then
to get into your novels and
essays being a primary and
secondary school student in
Ontario---reading what was
necessary to qualify for my
entrance to university, just
growing-up and making the
best of my little-town world.

I got religious experience in
very different ways to you &
involvement, in my case, was
with Australia and not France;1
I found a new power, a freedom,
a sense of a destiny to fulfil and I
worked out my identity, exploring
my society & myself, making it up
as I went along—and I went along
to many a town across 2 continents.

Out of my failures and my successes,
I saw hope, a new set of values, and I
gradually produced an autobiography
out of my efforts to make sense of this
complex world and my complex playful
self, as well as my own unique place in
history, remaking my world in my own
likeness and in the context of a vision
with a question before me:“What will
happen to all this radiant & pure beauty?”

1 Baldwin moved to Paris in November 1948 when he was twenty-four.“I left America,” he wrote in 1959, the year I joined the Baha’i Faith,“because I doubted my ability to survive the fury of the colour problem here…. I wanted to prevent myself from becoming merely a Negro; or, even, merely a Negro writer.”
I moved to Australia in July 1971 when I was 26 because I saw myself as part of Canada’s international Baha’i diaspora or pioneering mission overseas. I had already experienced some personal furies associated with episodes of bipolar disorder and more would come Downunder. I wanted to play a role in the then Nine Year Plan, 1964-1973, and I did.

Ron Price
11 November 2011

“With fire We test the gold.”

Since: Dec 07

George Town, Tasmania

#2 Nov 11, 2011
I am writing here about the famous writer--James Baldwin.-Ron in Tasmania
----------
BALDWIN and ME
MAKING IT UP AS WE WENT ALONG

In his first novel Go Tell It on the Mountain, published in 1953, American novelist, essayist, playwright, poet, and social critic, James Baldwin(1924-1987), wrote with intensity about the power of prayer and preaching. He wrote on behalf of an otherwise powerless community of which he was a part. It was a time, he wrote, filled with soaring possibilities in contrast to the bitter world outside.

It was as though life’s very bitterness offered his congregation a unique insight into the suffering of Christ, a bitterness which made the congregation for that time of prayer and preaching a chosen people whose spiritual exaltation, in all its fiery rhetoric and colourful abandon, could never be experienced by white people. Baldwin matched this novel with an essay,“Down at the Cross,” published in 1962, in which he wrote about his own conversion as an adolescent filled with doubts and fears and ambitions and a sharp sense of exclusion:
“One moment I was on my feet, singing and clapping and, at the same time, working out in my head the plot of a play; the next moment, with no transition, no sensation of falling, I was on my back, with the lights beating down into my face and all the vertical saints above me.”–Ron Price with thanks to Colm Toibin,“James Baldwin & Barack Obama,” The New York Review of Books, 23 October 2008.

I was too young back then
to get into your novels and
essays being a primary and
secondary school student in
Ontario---reading what was
necessary to qualify for my
entrance to university, just
growing-up and making the
best of my little-town world.

I got religious experience in
very different ways to you &
involvement, in my case, was
with Australia and not France;1
I found a new power, a freedom,
a sense of a destiny to fulfil and I
worked out my identity, exploring
my society & myself, making it up
as I went along—and I went along
to many a town across 2 continents.

Out of my failures and my successes,
I saw hope, a new set of values, and I
gradually produced an autobiography
out of my efforts to make sense of this
complex world and my complex playful
self, as well as my own unique place in
history, remaking my world in my own
likeness and in the context of a vision
with a question before me:“What will
happen to all this radiant & pure beauty?”

1 Baldwin moved to Paris in November 1948 when he was twenty-four.“I left America,” he wrote in 1959, the year I joined the Baha’i Faith,“because I doubted my ability to survive the fury of the colour problem here…. I wanted to prevent myself from becoming merely a Negro; or, even, merely a Negro writer.”
I moved to Australia in July 1971 when I was 26 because I saw myself as part of Canada’s international Baha’i diaspora or pioneering mission overseas. I had already experienced some personal furies associated with episodes of bipolar disorder and more would come Downunder. I wanted to play a role in the then Nine Year Plan, 1964-1973, and I did.

Ron Price
11 November 2011

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