Concussions and Brain damage in footb...

Concussions and Brain damage in football.

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For TED

Cadiz, KY

#1 Nov 3, 2012
Here you go TED, knock yourself out.
Ted

Paducah, KY

#2 Nov 3, 2012
Across the United States approximately 1.3 million high school football players are busy practicing in preparation for a new season.

They shouldn't be. A growing mound of research makes it clear that football is too dangerous for the human brain. It's hazardous to one's health, just like smoking.

Once the evidence on smoking was clear we banned it from our high school campuses. The same fate should now happen to football.

It hurts me to come to this conclusion. My dad was a football coach and I played the sport for six years. I enjoy watching football — at all levels. But I don't see any other way we can adequately protect the brains of young football players. It's important to note that young athletes' brains are more vulnerable to brain trauma than those of adults.

There aren't enough safety measures we can implement to overcome the fact that the brain isn't built to withstand the repetitive brain trauma inherent in a game built around violent collisions.

According to the Brain Injury Research Institute, in any given season, 20 percent of high school players sustain brain injuries. More than 40.5 percent of high school athletes who have suffered concussions return to action prematurely, which can lead to death from Second Impact Syndrome, a condition in which the brain swells, shutting down the brain stem and resulting in respiratory failure.

It's not just concussions we're concerned about. Purdue University researchers recently compared changes in the brains of high school football players who had suffered concussions with the brains of players who were concussion-free and found brain tissue damage in both. That's scary stuff. That means brain injuries are occurring without players, coaches or parents being aware of it.

Repetitive subconcussive hits to the head can cause as much damage as concussion-causing hits. A growing focus in the brain trauma field is chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a brain degeneration disease. It has many symptoms similar to Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases, however it isn't the result of some endogenous disease but due to brain injury — being hit too many times in the head.

Now consider that the average high school football lineman receives 1,000 to 1,500 shots to the head during a single football season, based on estimates by Boston University researchers.

Moreover, the effects of football-induced brain trauma often get worse over time. Consider that the number of former NFL players between the ages 30 and 49 who have received a diagnosis of "dementia, Alzheimer's disease or other memory-related disease" is 19 times the national average for that age group. Moreover, players who have suffered multiple concussions are three times more likely to suffer depression.

Clearly, football has a serious problem here. And there's no fix unless we eliminate blocking and tackling and go to flag football. Football is the lone high school sport where inflicting physical punishment on one's opponent is a primary objective.

Helmets are of little or no help. They're great at preventing skull fractures and lacerations but terrible at preventing brain damage. The reason is that the brain is like Jell-O bouncing up against the walls of the skull. It's a whiplash effect that leads to concussions. That's why players can receive concussions without even being hit in the head. A blow to the chest can send the brain splashing against the skull with as much force as a head-to-head shot.

Undeniably, the demise of high school football will be a culture shock for schools and communities around the country. Culture change experts say it takes seven years to fully adapt to major change. But using taxpayer-dollars to fund a school activity that is clearly detrimental to the brain simply isn't justifiable.
Ted

Paducah, KY

#3 Nov 3, 2012
Football proponents will argue that the game imparts lessons on the gridiron that can't be learned anywhere else. But life lessons like teamwork, leadership, perseverance, sacrifice, etc., can be just as easily and effectively acquired by participating in sports other than football.

Let's face it, football at the high school level is doomed. If parents don't rise up to stop it — in a Mothers Against Drunk Driving mode — insurance companies will. Inevitably, the new brain research will lead to lawsuits at all levels of the game. Football-related risk and liability will be hard to contain for school districts. And, when risk and liability can't be contained, insurance premium costs will shoot up, making the sponsoring of football cost prohibitive for high schools.

It may be 10 years, 20 years or 40 years before high school football's gone, but it will be gone. We can't put the medical research we're now aware of back in the bottle. But why do we have to wait? Let's act now and spare numerous young athletes — and their families — from dealing with the tragedies associated with football-induced brain trauma.

Article by Ken Reed Chicago tribune
Old Timer

Cadiz, KY

#4 Nov 3, 2012
Dosent look like your getting to much buisness TED. I guess you better high jack some other forum.
Mc fan

United States

#5 Nov 3, 2012
Our football has gone down the tubes!!
Concerned citizen

Sarasota, FL

#6 Nov 4, 2012
It's dangerous!!
Ted

Paducah, KY

#7 Nov 4, 2012
NEWS RELEASE
PHILADELPHIA — Years after a single traumatic brain injury (TBI), survivors still show changes in their brains. In a new study, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania suggest that Alzheimer's disease-like neurodegeneration may be initiated or accelerated following a single traumatic brain injury, even in young

Over 1.7 million Americans suffer a traumatic brain injury each year, and beyond the immediate effects, growing evidence demonstrates that a single TBI may initiate long-term processes that further damage the brain. TBI is an established risk factor for later development of cognitive impairments, such as Alzheimer's disease.

"A single traumatic brain injury is very serious, both initially, and as we're now learning, even later in life," said Douglas Smith, MD, professor of Neurosurgery and director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine, the study's co-senior author. "Plaques and tangles are appearing abnormally early in life, apparently initiated or accelerated by a single TBI."
WOW

United States

#8 Nov 4, 2012
Ted wrote:
NEWS RELEASE
PHILADELPHIA — Years after a single traumatic brain injury (TBI), survivors still show changes in their brains. In a new study, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania suggest that Alzheimer's disease-like neurodegeneration may be initiated or accelerated following a single traumatic brain injury, even in young
Over 1.7 million Americans suffer a traumatic brain injury each year, and beyond the immediate effects, growing evidence demonstrates that a single TBI may initiate long-term processes that further damage the brain. TBI is an established risk factor for later development of cognitive impairments, such as Alzheimer's disease.
"A single traumatic brain injury is very serious, both initially, and as we're now learning, even later in life," said Douglas Smith, MD, professor of Neurosurgery and director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine, the study's co-senior author. "Plaques and tangles are appearing abnormally early in life, apparently initiated or accelerated by a single TBI."
I didn't know we had 1.7 million football players a year to suffer a TBI.!!!!! Ted, no one is disputing the dangers of a head injury. Football is not the only place these head injuries occur. I played SOFTBALL for many years, and had a few injuries, including a head injury. Nothing severe, but I know when I'm in my 70-80's I will see some effects from it. I take life day by day. I would love to live to be 120 yrs old but we all know that's not going to happen. So, I enjoy each day as it comes, and any problems that day may bring I handle them and hope for a better day tomorrow. Head injuries are a happen constantly throughout the day, everywhere in the world. Protesting football on topix is not going to change that. If your so afraid of you or your child getting a head injury, just make sure you put your tricycle helmet on every time you get out of bed!!!!!
Ted

Paducah, KY

#9 Nov 5, 2012
WOW wrote:
<quoted text>
I didn't know we had 1.7 million football players a year to suffer a TBI.!!!!! Ted, no one is disputing the dangers of a head injury. Football is not the only place these head injuries occur. I played SOFTBALL for many years, and had a few injuries, including a head injury. Nothing severe, but I know when I'm in my 70-80's I will see some effects from it. I take life day by day. I would love to live to be 120 yrs old but we all know that's not going to happen. So, I enjoy each day as it comes, and any problems that day may bring I handle them and hope for a better day tomorrow. Head injuries are a happen constantly throughout the day, everywhere in the world. Protesting football on topix is not going to change that. If your so afraid of you or your child getting a head injury, just make sure you put your tricycle helmet on every time you get out of bed!!!!!
You seriously compairing softball to football? A high school football gets hit in the head hundreds of times a season., Way more in certain positions. Most softball players will never get hit in the head and none of them will get hit more than a few times.

If you are so unconcerned with your kid getting a head injury, why not sign him up for boxing?

The difference is: if I am wrong, my kid will miss out playing one of dozens of sports he might have played. If you,are wrong, your kid will pay for it his whole life and maybe die decades earlier than necessary.
Ted

Paducah, KY

#10 Nov 5, 2012
By NBC News and news services
SAN DIEGO -- A San Diego-area school district has agreed to pay a $4.4 million settlement to a man who suffered a head injury playing HIGH SCHOOLn football and now must communicate through a keyboard.
The agreement announced Friday comes as the problem of head injuries in football has gained prominence due to lawsuits brought against the National Football League by former players complaining of ongoing life struggles from concussions.
Scott Eveland, now 22, was a senior and a linebacker with the Mission Hills High School Grizzlies in San Marcos, a town 30 miles north of San Diego.
He collapsed on the sidelines after playing the first half of a game on Sept. 14, 2007, and was rushed to the hospital where doctors were able to save his life by removing part of his skull. But the heavy bleeding inside his brain caused him extensive damage.
More law suits

Paducah, KY

#11 Nov 5, 2012
     AUSTIN (CN)- A high school football coach and school district showed "no concern" for a player who suffered so many concussions he is permanently disabled at age 20, the man claims in Federal Court.
     Blake Allen Ripple sued Marble Falls Independent School District and Cord Woerner, his former head football coach and athletic director at Marble Falls High.
     Ripple says he is so disabled he cannot even go to a rehab center "due to constant vomiting."
     Marble Falls is about 45 miles northwest of Austin.
     "At one time Ripple was a National Honor Society Student and 'Academic All-District,'" the complaint states. "Now he is unable to live independently, let alone go to college. At one time was one of the highest rated linemen in the Central Texas area and was receiving interest for scholarships from a number of Division I colleges."
     Ripple says he suffered his first head injuries during helmet-on-helmet contact in an October 2009 game during his junior year.
     "Immediately after the injury, plaintiff was unable to remember what happened, was unsteady on his feet, staggered, and complained of nausea, dizziness, and a severe headache," the complaint states. "Plaintiff's trainer briefly talked to plaintiff on the sidelines after the injury, but he failed to render plaintiff aide and did not continue to observe plaintiff."
     When Ripple's parents expressed concern after the game, the trainer told them he would be fine after a shower, Ripple says. He says his parents took him to a hospital, and neither Woerner nor the trainer wanted to accompany them.
Ted

Paducah, KY

#12 Nov 7, 2012
On behalf of The Law Office of Marvin S. Lanter posted in Brain Injury on Monday, October 1, 2012
For many football fans, autumn heralds the start of football season. But, football players run the risk of sustaining serious injuries -- including serious brain injuries. Just a few weeks ago, this blog discussed brain trauma among NFL players. Unfortunately these injuries are by no means limited to professional or even adult players, as illustrated by a recent accident involving a California high school student.
A California high school football player is in critical condition after sustaining severe injuries during a high school football game. The student experienced a traumatic brain injury, as well as a collapsed lung. He is currently in the intensive care unit and is breathing with the help of a ventilator. His mother has been at his side in the ICU, and has been unable to return to work due to his medical needs.
Head injuries can cause serious brain trauma, such as bruising, bleeding, tearing or swelling. Injuries may be open, meaning the skull has been fractured, or they may be closed. A closed brain injury runs the risk of brain swelling and possibly fatal blood clots. In addition, a victim's cognitive, emotional and behavioral brain functions may be affected by a traumatic brain injury, rendering the victim unable to work or even pursue personal interests and activities. Furthermore, family members of brain injury victims may be unable to work while they provide care for the brain injury victim.
Sometimes, victims of brain injuries and their families choose to seek legal action to obtain compensation for their medical expenses and other financial losses. A medical evaluation of the victim may be necessary to determine the level of compensation available to victims and their loved ones. Such an examination will also be used to determine the extent, if any, the victim is able to return to work, as well as whether the victim will be able to live independently.
Football players face the dangers of experiencing severe injuries during the course of a game. But with the support of the community, this high school football player and his family are keeping hope alive for his recovery.
Ted

Paducah, KY

#13 Nov 7, 2012
As those who play and coach football learn new ways to improve safety — through training, medical response and equipment — sometimes they are left to contemplate this: brains remain vulnerable, and even the most ordinary collisions on the field can kill.

Teenagers are especially susceptible to having multiple hits to the head result in brain bleeds and massive swelling, largely because the brain tissue has not yet fully developed.
Ted

Paducah, KY

#14 Nov 7, 2012
"The most important implication of the new findings is the suggestion that a concussion is not just the result of a single blow, but it's really the totality of blows that took place over the season," said Eric Nauman, an associate professor of mechanical engineering and an expert in central nervous system and musculoskeletal trauma. "The one hit that brought on the concussion is arguably the straw that broke the camel's back."

[snip]

A common assumption in sports medicine is that certain people are innately more susceptible to head injury. However, the new findings suggest the number of hits received during the course of a season is the most important factor, Talavage said.

"Over the two seasons we had six concussed players, but 17 of the players showed brain changes even though they did not have concussions," Talavage said. "There is good correlation with the number of hits players received, but we need more subjects."

The Purdue researchers are expanding their research into soccer, something to look forward to in light of a 2011 study that linked heading the ball (which creates an impact around 20 Gs, the low end of impacts they measured on football players) with brain damage much like that found in football players.

If anything, this is a scarier possibility: that the brain damage linked to recent NFL tragedies can't merely be addressed by cracking down even more severely on barely legal hits or high-speed collisions, but that it's an ingrained part of the many small, inevitable helmet-to-helmet or helmet-to-knee collisions that occur during the game, and that it will be difficult or impossible to improve the equipment without sacrificing the improvements that have prevented so much severe brain injury.

During the 1960s, football became a much more deadly sport on the field. We've only recently begun to understand how the violence on the field becomes deadly off it. If anything's going to change, it will likely be at the collegiate or professional level, where the money and research exists to improve the equipment and the rules. But if we're to get rid of it altogether, don't look to the pros—look to high school and college, where voters and parents have some say, just as they did back in 1905.
Conan

Belvidere, IL

#15 Nov 8, 2012
What Does Not Kill Me, Makes Me Stronger!!!!!!
Ted

Paducah, KY

#16 Nov 8, 2012
Conan wrote:
What Does Not Kill Me, Makes Me Stronger!!!!!!
Problem is that it does kill you sometimes.

And when dealing with head blows, what does not kill me, makes me dumber!
Conan

Belvidere, IL

#17 Nov 8, 2012
What is good? Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women. This is good, This is good.
Conan

Belvidere, IL

#18 Nov 8, 2012
Right, it makes you dumber, it makes me stronger!
Ted

Paducah, KY

#19 Nov 10, 2012
Yea, I can tell!
Logic

Glenview Nas, IL

#20 Nov 10, 2012
Ted wrote:
Yea, I can tell!
Can you tell its making you more stupid????

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