Frank Mickes up for parole, look out ...
juli

Cookeville, TN

#67 Sep 10, 2009
I'm not convinced Frank was truly guilty, but if he was he has paid his debt to society and we should leave him alone.
ILBuckeye88

Macomb, MI

#68 Sep 10, 2009
juli wrote:
I'm not convinced Frank was truly guilty, but if he was he has paid his debt to society and we should leave him alone.
Makes sense. If you don't believe anyone at BHS is doing drugs why would you believe Frank Mickes is guilty?
DPD

Loveland, OH

#69 Sep 11, 2009
I really don't understand alot of these posts. Frank was sentenced and is now up for parole. That's it. If he gets out he has served his time. That is how it goes. There are convicted murderers walking amongst us. If you are so opposed to Frank being released then lobby the state capital to change the laws. I am a law enforcement officer and most would think my opinions would be different. What Frank did was the ultimate, there is no worse. But if the parole board says he is fit for society then we need to treat him that way. I knew Frank but only because I knew his sister and lived down the road from the family. I hope that he chooses to live elsewhere due to some of the idiots that still live at the lake.
Dan Hartley

Westerville, OH

#70 Sep 15, 2009
I just want all of you to know that Frank Mickes is an upstanding gentlemen who I met in prison for a crime similar, however I was more fortunate that the homeowners were not home. I by no means condone what Frank did so many years ago but I do believe that he is more prepared and equipt than most of the people in prison today to be released and become a very productive member of society. Today on the 15th day of September 2009, my friend Frank Mickes recieved an additional 5 years from the parole board and I assume many or all of you are happy about this. I am wondering do any of you have a forgiving bone in your body and what if we all lived up to the old saying "an eye for an eye" what then? well we all would be blind! Frank mentored me for 4 years and still to this day as I return to the prison on a regular basis and facilitate reentry programs and ministry programs. Frank has impacted my life and I am a better person for having known him. I owe many of my feats and successes to men like Frank.

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#71 Sep 15, 2009
So, if he's eligible for parole NOW...how can he get an "additional" five years? Five years for what?

Since: Jul 09

Gatlinburg, TN

#72 Sep 15, 2009
LCM..Sounds like he was denied parole today and won't be eligible for 5 more years.
Wally World

Asheville, NC

#73 Sep 15, 2009
Dr Jack wrote:
LCM..Sounds like he was denied parole today and won't be eligible for 5 more years.
My first impression was to let this guy rot in hell. But maybe he does deserve a second chance. Some people do change. I just feel that if maybe you were to meet this individual they might have a different opinion. And no I have never met him nor do I know him. I am just saying maybe he should get another chance at life.
believe

Cygnet, OH

#74 Sep 21, 2009
His sentence was for "life", if the parole board consideres his case and thinks he is suffiently rehabilitated, they can choose to release him with controls, if he vilolates these controls he goes back to prison. If he was not given parole they must have some doubts that he was not ready at this time. Time will tell if he continues to mentor the incoming inmates and maintain the standard that he says he has set for himself. As to the man who said he was mentored by this man, why did you feel that you had a right to enter someones home and take whatever you wanted. Maybe its a good thing the homeowners weren't home, you may not be telling your story and you would have deserved what ever you got!!!!!
Logan County Mom wrote:
So, if he's eligible for parole NOW...how can he get an "additional" five years? Five years for what?
james

Cygnet, OH

#75 Sep 22, 2009
DPD wrote:
I really don't understand alot of these posts. Frank was sentenced and is now up for parole. That's it. If he gets out he has served his time. That is how it goes. There are convicted murderers walking amongst us. If you are so opposed to Frank being released then lobby the state capital to change the laws. I am a law enforcement officer and most would think my opinions would be different. What Frank did was the ultimate, there is no worse. But if the parole board says he is fit for society then we need to treat him that way. I knew Frank but only because I knew his sister and lived down the road from the family. I hope that he chooses to live elsewhere due to some of the idiots that still live at the lake.
If he was turned down, then the parole board didn't think he was ready to spend the "rest" of his sentence on parole. Why can't he go to Iraq and help the guys that need someone to talk to about being on the front lines and having to kill people? He is more than bodily able to be there if our soldiers have to be there. Besides his (idiot)buddy (can't keep a job, live off of daddy) that provided the drugs that night is in Fla now dealing down there. You think there are no drugs in prison? want to buy a bridge??
the facts

Columbus, OH

#76 Sep 22, 2009
Considering that according to Wikepedia, there are only 400 residents in the town of Roann where so many of these negative and vindictive posts come from, I think that James and every other name that has popped up is the same person, so dude...what is your agenda???? You make me sick...he got five more years...LET IT GO!!!! Move on to someone else!!!!!
james wrote:
<quoted text>
If he was turned down, then the parole board didn't think he was ready to spend the "rest" of his sentence on parole. Why can't he go to Iraq and help the guys that need someone to talk to about being on the front lines and having to kill people? He is more than bodily able to be there if our soldiers have to be there. Besides his (idiot)buddy (can't keep a job, live off of daddy) that provided the drugs that night is in Fla now dealing down there. You think there are no drugs in prison? want to buy a bridge??
james

Cygnet, OH

#77 Sep 23, 2009
the facts wrote:
Considering that according to Wikepedia, there are only 400 residents in the town of Roann where so many of these negative and vindictive posts come from, I think that James and every other name that has popped up is the same person, so dude...what is your agenda???? You make me sick...he got five more years...LET IT GO!!!! Move on to someone else!!!!!
<quoted text>
Talk about an Indian Lake idiot, classic example. They all think they can blame anything they do on some problem or someone else. You really think they put the actual town that we live in on here?? You think the parole people actually read a rag like this to make their decisions. They go by facts!!!!!!!!Now I suppose its their fault he got 5 more years.
the facts

Columbus, OH

#78 Sep 23, 2009
You pessimism and anger scares me....
james wrote:
<quoted text>
Talk about an Indian Lake idiot, classic example. They all think they can blame anything they do on some problem or someone else. You really think they put the actual town that we live in on here?? You think the parole people actually read a rag like this to make their decisions. They go by facts!!!!!!!!Now I suppose its their fault he got 5 more years.
Olivier

Carlisle, PA

#79 Sep 23, 2009
Wally World wrote:
<quoted text>
My first impression was to let this guy rot in hell. But maybe he does deserve a second chance. Some people do change. I just feel that if maybe you were to meet this individual they might have a different opinion. And no I have never met him nor do I know him. I am just saying maybe he should get another chance at life.
God is forgiving,humans are not.
Laker

Catawba, OH

#80 Sep 24, 2009
People who murder other people should be executed by the state.

Murder = an unjust killing.

Executing a murderer = a just killing.

My tax money has kept this murderer housed, fed and clothed for the last 20 years. How unjust!
Dan Hartley

Vanlue, OH

#81 Sep 29, 2009
This past weekend I served on a team called Torch, This is were my life was changed while residing in Marion Correctional Institution with Frank Mickes. Frank was on the team this weekend as well and served as a leader. I told Frank about this topic talk that we all have been posting our thoughts on and he was very interested and decided to write a letter and asked me to post it on his behalf and it is my pleasure to do so, so here it is. Hello, my name is Frank Mickes #192-602.Recently I went back in front of the parole board for the 3rd time and recieved an additional 5 years for the crime I committed back in 1986. I've presently served 23 1/2 years on a 20-Life sentenced that I have recieved. Many of you enetered comments on this page about me even though you don't know me. You read about my crime and immediately cast judgement on me not knowing any of the details of my case. It's easy to read an article and jump to your own conclusions without knowing anything about the person I am today. That's what the parole board does. Believe me when I say this because I am ashamed of what I am in here for and I take full responsability without reservastion for what I did. I am not this evil person many of you percieve me to be. Reba Clark did not deserve what happend to her. I never knew who she was and I have fought hard within myself for the past 23 1/2 years trying to put a face to the woman who lost her life because of a horrible decision I made. Thankfully I began doing that in 1990 when I was baptized. Not only was I able to forgive myself, but asked for Reba to forgive me. The process began and I had many wonderful staff members and fellow residents who taught me how to live for Jesus. I learned that Jesus shed his blood on the cross for all of ours sins. Our responibilty was to acc heart. We can all take away something new when we learn to forgive. When I became incarcerated in 1986 I had an enourmous amount of pressure on my shoulders. Through my crime I was able to turn this tragedy into a stepping stone to find myself with the guidence of Jesus Christ. With everything we live for in prison weather it be a higher power, gladness, joy or pain, health or illness, it can all be a part of the full realization of our humanity. Nonetheless, real care and true forgiveness come from the willingness to mend a tragedy and turn it in to the gateway to joy. When I look at the suffering I have caused my victims family, my friends, my family and the community I discover that nothing if foregin to me, but all the hatred and love, cruelty and compassion, fear and joy, can be found in our own hearts. None of us are perfect. Over the past 23 1/2 years I have had many wonderful people come into my life. Many from the Kairos community and they continue to be serious factors in my life.
Dan Hartley

Vanlue, OH

#82 Sep 29, 2009
As I am writing this I am involved with a ministry called Kairos Torch. It's geard toward trying to save the lives of 18-25 years old men to Christ. There are so many young people in prison today with little or no direction in their lives. most of society has written them off, however the Torch family gives them a second chance and shows them what real love looks like. One of the men I have had the privalage of mentoring and is living a productive life as a free man is Dan Hartley (me). He is a great man who is living for the Lord. Here at MCI we have been blessed to have 2 warden back to back who love and serve the LordJesus Christ. Mrs. Christine Money and Mrs. Margaret Beightler have opened the doors to allow Jesus to flow freely through our institution. They give each of us an oppourtunity to find ourselves. When I went in front of the parole board a few weeks ago Mrs. Beightler our warden spoke on my behalf and told them to let me go. She told them we have done our job and this man has rehabilitated himself and has everything set for him to live a successful life outside of prison. She has been in the system for 29 years and doesn't just go speak to the parole board for people on a regular basis and for just anyone. She has watched me grow into the man I've always known I could be. Needless to say the parole board didn't take in to account what she said because I was given an additional 5 years due to seriousness of my crime. My question to you all and to the parole board is, Are you all the same person you were 23 1/2 years ago? People do change! I am a 42 year old man with a clear direction for my life. I just need a chance to prove my worth. Staying in prison for 5 more years is not going to serve anybody any good. It's only going to continue to cost tax payers money,and prevent me from putting to use what I have learned in here. All I can do now is ask for your forgiveness and allow my family to have me back. I have paid for my crime. My supporters will not allow me to fail and I know beyond a shadow of a doubt I won't Thank you for listening to me. In Jesus Name, Frank Mickesept Him into our hearts and do our best to be the example He wants us to be. He doesn't hold any restrictions on His forgiveness. For those of you who do read your Bible will know that Moses, David, and Paul were all guilty of murder and God forgave them. paul was a persecuter of Christians until the Holy Spirit touched his heart. He became one of the greatest evangalist ever. David was described as a man after God's own
Dontthinkso

Mount Vernon, OH

#84 Sep 29, 2009
Dear Frank

You have not paid for your crime and you have not changed. If you had you would have accepted the decision of the parole board without any comment. You still deny that you should continue to serve your court appointed sentence.

If you are a true follower of the Lord, then you should be willing to turn control of your life over to the lord, including the decision of the parole board. After all, God influenced that decision too, right? Maybe, just maybe, it might be Gods plan for you to not be released right now? But you can't see that, you just say that "needless to say, the parole board didn't take into account what the warden said". To me that sounds an awful lot like relying on the word of a human to override the will of god. A true christian would not do that.

Am I judging you? You bet I am. And as a member of this community, you are right where I want you...in prison. If god forgives you, you will get your reward in the afterlife. Till then I for one hope you are turned down again in five years.
Manuel

Lima, OH

#85 Sep 30, 2009
T
T
T
Now the TRUTH about Frank

Sunbury, OH

#86 Oct 3, 2009
I've been sitting here reading all of the above comments. Unfortunately, NONE of you know Frank today. The young 18 year old who was on drugs and went to prison 23 1/2 years ago has grown into a wonderful man. He is VERY sorry for the crime he committed.
Since being in prison he has earned 2 associate degrees, has taken every course available to him and is well respected by the warden as well as many of the corrections officers there. He is very active in all of the prison ministries and many times is asked to mentor young men coming into the system. He lives with his crime every day of his life and is well aware of the fact that nothing can ever bring his victim back. He has been offered many job opportunities by individuals on the outside who have met him through the Christian organizations in the prison system. He did not intend to return to Logan Co. if he were released and is certainly NOT a threat to society.
I've known Frank since he was a young boy and at this stage in his life I am very proud to be his friend. He has turned his life around under the worst of circumstances. He has the capablility of speaking to young people to help them so they don't make the horrible choices he made in his young life.
Before all of you are so judgmental, you should know what you are talking about. I wonder how many of you would want to be judged your ENTIRE life on the things you did as a young person.
I am in NO way condoning what Frank did! I do, however, believe in forgiveness and in time served. I agree, there are many in prison who do not deserve a second chance (although many seem to get 2nd, 3rd, 4th and many more chances) but Frank DOES deserve to be released. If the prison system is really meant to REHABILITATE, then they have done their job with Frank.
The warden at the prison even thought enough of him to speak to the Parole Board on his behalf. She has only done that for prisoners 2 other times in 29 years. I think that speaks for itself. He also had MANY letters of support from staff members who have watched him grow up in prison. He is NOT the same young drug abuser that arrived there so many years ago.
I'm very sorry that the Parole Board turned down his request for parole. I wish they had listened to the people around Frank that actually KNOW him instead of all of you who don't have the slightest idea what you are talking about!

“Listen to Jazz Music”

Since: Mar 09

Bellefontaine, OH

#87 Oct 3, 2009
Is Frank the son of Bill Mickes and Thelma Parmer Mickes ? Grandson of Mary Mickes ?

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