Bible study rules for public schools proposed

Feb 10, 2010 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: The Courier-Journal

FRANKFORT, Ky. - The state would create rules for teaching about the Bible in public high schools under a bill filed Monday by three Democratic senators.

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“Question, Explore, Discover”

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#107609
Jun 28, 2013
 
Romans chp one wrote:
If you are a born again christian, the Lord teaches you not to entertain fables and silly questions of this world but to keep your mind upon him as you live daily. If you hate God and all the things that pertain to God, he knows you have learned of him mentally only and therefore chose to reject his means of salvation only by the way of Jesus and his work at the cross of calvary. Therefore, God unleases upon you mental learners of Godly ways, haters of God's ways, a reprobate mind to live your life as you choose and in the end of your life, spilt hell wide open for your unbelief and rejection of Christ which was your only hope to salvation. You reject Christ and commit the act of apostasy upon your soul for eternity and can never be born again of his spirit when you go this far against him. See you at the white throne judgment of God!!!
Prove it.
Yes and Amen

Richmond, KY

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#107610
Jun 28, 2013
 

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Mike Duquette wrote:
<quoted text>Comparing homosexuals to child molesters is just fueling the fire of bullying.
If your perversion is not intruding upon non consenting persons of age, or animals, the constitution has no valid stipulations to make it illegal.
It is so sad you do not even understand the constitution.
America is not a theocracy. It does not have to bow to your superstitious dogma for rules.
It's a Moral thing!
I know you have NO idea what that is, but you will!
Yes and Amen

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#107611
Jun 28, 2013
 

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KittenKoder wrote:
<quoted text>
You know your god is really you, right?
IF that was the case...
His God is better than your god!
NO! God is God!
Get to know Him!

“Breaking the spell ”

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#107612
Jun 28, 2013
 

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Yes and Amen wrote:
<quoted text>It's a Moral thing!
I know you have NO idea what that is, but you will!
Says your superstition, which a secular nation does not need respect for law making purposes. Note how DOMA was deemed unconstitutional.
Their was a time when your god prophets claimed eating shellfish was a sin. Wearing clothes of two different fibers was a sin. Now why should we listen to your superstitious concerns again?

“See how you are?”

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#107613
Jun 28, 2013
 

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Romans chp one wrote:
If you are a born again christian, the Lord teaches you not to entertain fables and silly questions of this world but to keep your mind upon him as you live daily. If you hate God and all the things that pertain to God, he knows you have learned of him mentally only and therefore chose to reject his means of salvation only by the way of Jesus and his work at the cross of calvary. Therefore, God unleases upon you mental learners of Godly ways, haters of God's ways, a reprobate mind to live your life as you choose and in the end of your life, spilt hell wide open for your unbelief and rejection of Christ which was your only hope to salvation. You reject Christ and commit the act of apostasy upon your soul for eternity and can never be born again of his spirit when you go this far against him. See you at the white throne judgment of God!!!
"If you are a born again christian, the Lord teaches you not to entertain fables and silly questions..."

Dang, ain't THAT the shiz?
Sounds like you've really got the between a rock and a hard place, conundrum, quandary, dichotomy, contradiction, paradox, can't know whether to flip or fly, damned if you do damned if you don't, been told to sit in the corner of a round room, dog chasing its own tail logical fallacy goin' on there. No wonder fundie logic makes 'bout as much sense as painting air with a bucket of aardvark.

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#107614
Jun 28, 2013
 

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KittenKoder wrote:
<quoted text>
You should choose more reputable and accurate sources.
I fully understand that all Atheists will attempt to destroy the credibility of the report published by The American Journal of Psychiatry.
According to it's findings,not believing in God is very detrimental to your mental health.
The solution to the problem appears to be to seek God.
Obviously that is a subject Atheists do not want to discuss.
To clear the air,I will post the entire report
christurkiddingm e

Pikeville, KY

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#107616
Jun 28, 2013
 
it shouldnt even be taught unless eqall time is spent on the Jewish faith and muslimd and buda.bad enough parents feed their children this stuff.Discusions like these belong with stories of Santa and flying reindeer

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Jun 28, 2013
 

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Suicide rates are lower in religious countries than in secular ones (1, 2). Some of this difference may be due to underreporting in religious countries because of concerns over stigma (3). Yet, some of the difference may be real, although it is not known whether the negative association between religion and suicide is due to its integrative benefits (such as social cohesion, as proposed by Durkheim in 1951 [4]) or to the moral imperatives of religious belief, given its prohibitions against suicidal behavior (1, 5–7). Most previous studies have been epidemiologic and have investigated the association between completed suicide and religion. An inverse relationship between religious commitment and suicidal ideation has also been reported (5, 8–10). However, reports regarding religious affiliation and suicide attempt are sparse. Morphew (11) compared 50 suicide attempters hospitalized after self-poisoning with respect to their religious beliefs and practices. He found no significant differences in terms of Catholic versus Protestant affiliation. Similarly, Malone et al.(12) reported that religious persuasion, defined as Catholic and non-Catholic, did not differ between suicide attempters and nonattempters. Kok (13) compared suicide attempt rates in Chinese, Malay, and Indian women in Singapore and concluded that the comparatively low rate of attempted suicide in Malay women was due to their religion, since Islam strictly forbids suicide.

Studies of religious commitment in general suggest a protective effect as well. In a sample of institutionalized chronically ill elderly, Nelson (14) showed that intensity of religious commitment was negatively associated with suicide gestures. In a cross-national study of 25 countries, Stack (1) concluded that protective effects were not due to any specific religious denomination per se but rather to a strong religious commitment to basic life-preserving values, beliefs, and practices that reduce rates of suicide.

Therefore, we examined factors associated with religious affiliation and nonaffiliation in depressed inpatients, generally considered to be at highest risk for a suicide attempt. We hypothesized that the religious subjects would report more moral objections to suicide as measured with the Reasons for Living Inventory (15). This instrument includes questions that reflect traditional religious beliefs: "I believe only God has the right to end a life," "My religious beliefs forbid it," "I am afraid of going to Hell," and "I consider it morally wrong." We examined the relationship between religious affiliation and social cohesion by examining the amount of time spent with relatives in religiously affiliated versus unaffiliated patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating the relationship between religious affiliation status and suicide attempts in a clinical sample.

Method

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Jun 28, 2013
 

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Statistical Methods
Pearson correlations, t tests, and chi-square analyses were used to identify correlated variables. Subjects who endorsed a religious affiliation and those who did not were compared in terms of demographic and clinical variables by using chi-square analyses for categorical variables and t tests for continuous variables. Backward stepwise regressions were conducted for the purpose of data reduction. One regression included all demographic variables that differed significantly between religiously affiliated and unaffiliated subjects as the independent variables and suicide attempt as the outcome variable. Similar analyses were conducted with the clinical variables that differed significantly between the two groups. A final model was subjected to logistic regression with suicide attempt as the outcome variable and religious affiliation as the independent variable after we controlled for moral objections to suicide and significant demographic and clinical factors selected in the data reduction regressions. A similar procedure was used for suicidal ideation, resulting in a final linear regression with suicidal ideation as the outcome variable.

In order to investigate whether moral objections to suicide mediate the relationship between suicidal behavior and religious affiliation, we used an established three-step procedure (28). First, we examined the bivariate association between religious affiliation and suicide attempt and whether the magnitude of this association was reduced when moral objections to suicide were controlled statistically. Second, we investigated whether religious affiliation was associated with moral objections to suicide. Finally, we determined whether moral objections to suicide were associated with suicide attempt after religious affiliation was controlled statistically. If all three conditions were met, it could be inferred that moral objections to suicide mediate the association between religious affiliation and suicide attempt.

Results
Abstract | Method | Results | Discussion | References

Two hundred ninety-five (79.5%) of the subjects had a diagnosis of major depressive disorder, and 76 (20.5%) had bipolar disorder, currently depressed. There were 189 subjects (50.9%) with a lifetime history of a suicide attempt. One hundred seventy-five (47.2%) had a history of substance use disorder. The mean clinical ratings were 20.1 (SD=6.2) on the Hamilton depression scale, 28.1 (SD=11.4) on the Beck Depression Inventory, and 36.3 (SD=8.1) on the BPRS. Among the subjects who reported a religious affiliation (N=305), the specific denominations endorsed were Catholicism (41.0%, N=125), Protestantism (28.5%, N=87), Judaism (17.4%, N=53), and other (13.1%, N=40).

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Effect of Religious Affiliation in Subjects With Depression
Subjects with no religious affiliation were more often lifetime suicide attempters, reported more suicidal ideation, and were more likely to have first-degree relatives who had committed suicide than religiously affiliated subjects.

The religiously affiliated and unaffiliated subjects did not differ in terms of gender, race, education, or income. Religiously unaffiliated subjects were younger, less often married, and less often had children. Religiously affiliated subjects reported a more family-oriented social network, reflected in more time spent with first-degree relatives. In contrast, most unaffiliated subjects (74.3%) reported more nonfamilial relationships (friends and others)(t1).

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Jun 28, 2013
 

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There were no differences between groups in the level of subjective depression (Beck Depression Inventory), objective depression (Hamilton depression scale), hopelessness (Beck Hopelessness Scale), life events (St. Paul-Ramsey Scale), or global functioning (GAS)(t2). Lower general psychopathology scores (BPRS) were found in the patients with no religious affiliation. Significantly higher lifetime scores for aggression (Brown-Goodwin Aggression Inventory) and impulsivity (Barratt Impulsivity Scale) but not hostility (Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory) were found in the religiously unaffiliated group. Furthermore, a history of substance use disorder was more common in the subjects with no religious affiliation (t2). Subjects with no religious affiliation also reported fewer perceived reasons for living (Reasons for Living Inventory). In particular, scores on three Reasons for Living Inventory subscales: responsibility to family (t=3.1, df=262, p=0.002), child-related concerns (t=2.6, df=253, p=0.008), and moral objections to suicide (t=4.7, df=97.6, p<0.001) were higher in the religiously affiliated group. The scores on other Reasons for Living Inventory subscales did not significantly differ between the two groups: survival and coping beliefs (t=1.83, df=261, p<0.07), fear of suicide (t=0.83, df=261, p<0.41), and fear of social disapproval (t=0.24, df=97, p<0.81).

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Relationship Between Religious Affiliation and Suicide Attempts
A backward stepwise logistic regression showed that age (odds ratio=0.97, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.95 to 0.99; Wald &#967;2=7.84, p=0.005), but not marital status, parental status, or time spent with family, was significantly associated with suicide attempt status. With regard to clinical variables, only lifetime aggression (odds ratio=1.09, 95% CI=1.03 to 1.14; Wald &#967;2=9.83, p=0.002) and responsibility to family (odds ratio=0.93, 95% CI=0.91 to 0.97; Wald &#967;2=17.99, p<0.001) were significantly associated with suicide attempt status, whereas history of past substance use, lifetime impulsivity, general acute psychopathology as rated by the BPRS, and child-related concerns were not.

On the basis of these two data reduction regressions, a final model was tested with suicide attempt status as the outcome variable and age, aggression, responsibility to family, religious affiliation, and moral objections to suicide as the independent variables. Backward stepwise logistic regressions showed that low moral objections to suicide, high lifetime aggression levels, and less feeling of responsibility to family were significantly associated with suicide attempt, whereas religious affiliation per se and age were not (t3). Although the odds ratio for aggression and moral objections to suicide were low (1.09 and 0.90 respectively), the score ranges for these variables indicate a meaningful effect on risk for suicide attempt.

Of note, there was no significant correlation between moral objections to suicide and aggression level (r=–0.08, df=249, p<0.18). Also, when entered in a logistic backward conditional regression model with suicide attempt as a dependent variable, both variables remained significant and independent (moral objections to suicide: odds ratio=0.89, 95% CI=0.85 to 0.93 [[test statistic]=[value], p<0.001]; aggression: odds ratio=1.1, 95% CI=1.06 to 1.1 [[test statistic]=[value], p<0.001]).

Moral objections to suicide mediated the association between religious affiliation and suicide attempt as all three stipulated conditions were met (28). First, religious affiliation was significantly associated with moral objections to suicide. Second, moral objections to suicide was significantly associated with suicide attempt when religious affiliation was statistically controlled. Third, the significant bivariate association between religious affiliation and suicide attempt did not remain significant when moral objections to suicide were controlled statistically (F1).

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Jun 28, 2013
 

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Relationship Between Religious Affiliation and Suicidal Ideation
Linear stepwise regressions with suicidal ideation as the dependent variable showed that of the demographic variables, age was significant (&#946;=–0.182, t=–2.9, p=0.003), whereas marital and child-related concerns were not significant. The final model with suicidal ideation as the outcome variable and age, aggression, responsibility to family, religious affiliation, and moral objections to suicide as the independent variables revealed that high aggression scores, low moral objections to suicide, and younger age were significantly and independently associated with suicidal ideation. Religious affiliation and responsibility to family were not (t4).
Discussion
Abstract | Method | Results | Discussion | References
Kendler et al.(29) noted that religiosity is a prominent and complex aspect of human culture relatively neglected in comprehensive biopsychosocial models of psychopathology. Indeed, religious commitment to a few core life-saving beliefs may protect against suicide (1, 7, 30).
The main finding of this study was that religiously affiliated subjects were less likely to have a history of suicide attempts, the best predictor of future suicide or attempts (31). Moreover, greater moral objections to suicide that may represent traditional religious beliefs mediated the protective effect of religious affiliation against suicidal behavior in a clinical sample of depressed patients. Individuals with a religious affiliation also reported less suicidal ideation at the time of evaluation, despite comparable severity of depression, number of adverse life events, and severity of hopelessness. Of note, suicidal ideation, a risk factor for suicidal acts, has been found to be inversely related to religion (5, 8–10). Therefore, religion may provide a positive force that counteracts suicidal ideation in the face of depression, hopelessness, and stressful events.
Previous studies have not established an association between specific religious denomination (i.e., Catholic versus Protestant) and suicidal behavior. Our findings suggest that assessment of presence or absence of religious affiliation, regardless of denomination, may be more useful. Rather, lack of affiliation may be a risk factor for suicidal acts.
Suicidal behavior is related to aggressive and impulsive traits (30), and anger predicts future suicidal behavior in adolescent boys (32). Religiosity has been reported to be associated with lower hostility, less anger, and less aggressiveness (33, 34), which is consistent with our findings. Of note, aggression and moral objections to suicide were independently associated with suicidal behavior in this sample. Therefore, religious affiliation may affect suicidal behavior both by lowering aggression levels and independently through moral objections to suicide. Of interest is the fact that Boomsma et al.(35) found that in a twin sample, receiving a religious upbringing reduced the influence of genetic factors on disinhibition.
The relationship between religious affiliation and aggression in our study of depressed inpatients suggests therapeutic interventions for the prevention of deliberate self-harm. The potential for prevention by using therapeutic interventions aimed toward aggressive behaviors is strongly supported by reports that anger reduction leads to decreased parasuicidal behavior after dialectical behavioral therapy (36). Thus, supporting religious beliefs that patients find useful in coping with stress (33) and which may also reduce anger could be a useful tool in a therapeutic process that targets suicide prevention. Furthermore, patients who are wavering about their religious affiliation could receive support for their own ambivalently held beliefs and more specifically for their moral objections to suicide.

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#107621
Jun 28, 2013
 

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Religious commitment promotes social ties and reduces alienation (33). We found weaker family ties in religiously unaffiliated subjects, and family members are reported to be more likely to provide reliable emotional support, nurturance, and reassurance of worth (37). Our finding is consistent with reports about less dense social networks among atheists (38), although whether distancing from one’s family facilitates disaffiliation from the family’s religion or vice versa is not known.

The greatest protective effect of religion on suicide is reported to be present in subjects who have relatives and friends of the same religion (38). Although in our study social network was not independently related to suicidal behavior, stronger feelings of responsibility to family were found in religiously affiliated subjects, who were also more often parents and married. Responsibility to family was inversely related to acting on suicidal thoughts. Most religions stress the importance and value of family. Thus, consistent with previous reports (5, 6, 30), a commitment to a set of personal religious beliefs appears to be a more important factor against suicidal behavior than social cohesiveness per se. As noted by Pescosolido and Georgianna (38), religion’s role in suicidal behavior, operating through a social network mechanism, seems to be more complex than Durkheim’s social cohesion theory would suggest.

A tendency toward increased religiosity in older age (39) is consistent with the fact that the religious subjects in our study were older than nonreligious subjects (40). In our clinical sample, age was related to suicidal ideation but not to suicide attempt status.

Although it is not known whether there is causality involved in the association between suicide attempt and lack of religious affiliation, Kendler et al.(29) have argued that, in general, the effect of religious commitment on personal (mal)adjustment is stronger than the reverse. As Neeleman and Persaud (41) stated, psychiatric practice might be improved if an understanding of the role of religious beliefs in mental health and adaptation were integrated into research and practice. Yet, a recent survey of Canadian psychiatrists (42) showed that they did not assign importance to prayer above medication and psychotherapy in the case of suicidality, although they recognized its usefulness for other mental health difficulties. Indeed, psychiatrists are also reported to be less religious than the general population (43, 44), yet support of the patient’s spirituality has been deemed an ethical imperative, reflecting a physician’s commitment to the patient’s best interest (45).

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Our study showed a relationship between religious affiliation status and suicide attempts in a clinical sample of depressed inpatients. It seems that the constellation of religious beliefs and lower aggression level, together with a higher threshold for suicidal thoughts in religiously affiliated depressed subjects, reduces risk for suicidal acts. Given the insufficient attention to patients’ religious attitudes by psychiatrists in general, support for the patient’s own religious affiliation could be an additional resource in psychiatric and psychotherapeutic treatments targeting suicidal acts.

Received Oct. 16, 2003; revision received Jan. 22, 2004; accepted Feb. 4, 2004. From the Department of Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute; and the Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York. Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Oquendo, Department of Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Dr., Unit Number 42, New York, NY 10032. This work was supported by NIMH grants MH-62185, MH-40695, and MH-48514 and funding from the Stanley Medical Research Institute.
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Figure 1.
Moral Objections to Suicide as Mediator of Religious Affiliation

aSignificant association between religious affiliation and moral objections to suicide (odds ratio=1.11, 95% CI=1.05 to 1.18; Wald &#967;2=14.07, p<0.001).

bSignificant association between moral objections to suicide and suicide attempt when religious affiliation was statistically controlled (adjusted odds ratio=0.90, 95% CI=0.87 to 0.94; Wald &#967;2=22.72, p<0.001).

cSignificant bivariate association between religious affiliation and suicide attempt that did not remain significant when moral objections to suicide were controlled statistically (adjusted odds ratio=1.3, 95% CI=0.71 to 2.6; Wald &#967;2=0.90, p<0.34).

Figure 1.
Moral Objections to Suicide as Mediator of Religious Affiliation

aSignificant association between religious affiliation and moral objections to suicide (odds ratio=1.11, 95% CI=1.05 to 1.18; Wald &#967;2=14.07, p<0.001).

bSignificant association between moral objections to suicide and suicide attempt when religious affiliation was statistically controlled (adjusted odds ratio=0.90, 95% CI=0.87 to 0.94; Wald &#967;2=22.72, p<0.001).

cSignificant bivariate association between religious affiliation and suicide attempt that did not remain significant when moral objections to suicide were controlled statistically (adjusted odds ratio=1.3, 95% CI=0.71 to 2.6; Wald &#967;2=0.90, p<0.34).

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#107623
Jun 28, 2013
 

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Quantummist wrote:
<quoted text>
If there is no God but there are those that Believe there is then what Bacon bits says is moot.... Atheist are not concerned with a God.... Atheists are concerned with what Believer in God might do in the real world due to living part time in a make believe world....
If there is a God,but there are those who do not believe there is then what Bacon says is very relevant and accurate.
Those who deny God may well be suffering from Cotard's syndrome
The Cotard delusion or Cotard's syndrome, also known as nihilistic or negation delusion, is a rare neuropsychiatric disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that he or she is dead,and that God does not exist


Read more: http://www.monstropedia.org/index.php...
In this lecture, Cotard described a patient with the pseudonym of Mademoiselle X, who denied the existence of God, the Devil, several parts of her body and denied she needed to eat.

And it may be that you should concern yourself with the detrimental
effect on your mental health caused by your foolish bellief that there is no God.
That problem is self inflicted.
Don't blame Christianity or God....

“See how you are?”

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Jun 28, 2013
 

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Khubala wrote:
<quoted text>
I fully understand that all Atheists will attempt to destroy the credibility of the report published by The American Journal of Psychiatry.
According to it's findings,not believing in God is very detrimental to your mental health.
The solution to the problem appears to be to seek God.
Obviously that is a subject Atheists do not want to discuss.
To clear the air,I will post the entire report
Hey Kukla. All you had to do was link

http://psychiatryonline.org/data/Journals/AJP...

Done deal.
Similar studies have been done of demographic groups that have reached the conclusion that it is primarily social support and interaction that benefits mental, emotional and physical conditions, especially among the elderly.
Your interpretation and conclusion that "not believing in God is very detrimental to your mental health" is pure confirmation bias.
ProvenScience

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Mike Duquette wrote:
<quoted text>Says your superstition, which a secular nation does not need respect for law making purposes. Note how DOMA was deemed unconstitutional.
Their was a time when your god prophets claimed eating shellfish was a sin. Wearing clothes of two different fibers was a sin. Now why should we listen to your superstitious concerns again?
Only if anyone insists on being mired in and harping at stone age mentality level...kind of like not acknowledging the FACT that eating shellfish during a yellow or red tide might not be such a good idea, and wearing wool in 90 degree weather is not too bright either.

All these social whining non issues-wastes of time-not gonna change a thing on HOW or WHAT people think, or how anything operates now anyway.
Just MORE wastes of tax payer dollars that SHOULD spent on things like REAL immigration reform, welfare reform, jobs in a floundering economy, building and maintaining crumbling infrastructures and affordable (not FWEE) healthcare for everyone-NOT just some.

Hail the WHINIEST adminsitration ever-wahwahwah, where duh fwee everthing lines...wahwahwah.

Biggest Buncha backwards, whiney, duhmazz, commie-leaning slackerTics ever. Wahwahwah....

“I Am No One Else”

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#107626
Jun 28, 2013
 

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Yes and Amen wrote:
<quoted text>IF that was the case...
His God is better than your god!
NO! God is God!
Get to know Him!
I do not pretend my imaginary friend was anything more than a childhood dream, thus why I gave mine up when I grew up, instead of just calling it god like you do. You should consider growing up too.

“I Am No One Else”

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ProvenScience wrote:
<quoted text>
Only if anyone insists on being mired in and harping at stone age mentality level...kind of like not acknowledging the FACT that eating shellfish during a yellow or red tide might not be such a good idea, and wearing wool in 90 degree weather is not too bright either.
All these social whining non issues-wastes of time-not gonna change a thing on HOW or WHAT people think, or how anything operates now anyway.
Just MORE wastes of tax payer dollars that SHOULD spent on things like REAL immigration reform, welfare reform, jobs in a floundering economy, building and maintaining crumbling infrastructures and affordable (not FWEE) healthcare for everyone-NOT just some.
Hail the WHINIEST adminsitration ever-wahwahwah, where duh fwee everthing lines...wahwahwah.
Biggest Buncha backwards, whiney, duhmazz, commie-leaning slackerTics ever. Wahwahwah....
Actually, wool is an insulator, it can also keep heat out. You should learn a bit about stuff before you attempt to justify your myths. Anything with air pockets can be used to insulate against heat and cold, certain forms of wool are great at this. That is also the reason wearing things like robes and cloaks work well in the deserts, it adds a layer of air between you and the sun's radiation, thus reducing how much heat makes it to your body, thus you stay cooler. Synthetics are the best at this though, as can be designed specifically with temperature control in mind.
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KittenKoder wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, wool is an insulator, it can also keep heat out. You should learn a bit about stuff before you attempt to justify your myths. Anything with air pockets can be used to insulate against heat and cold, certain forms of wool are great at this. That is also the reason wearing things like robes and cloaks work well in the deserts, it adds a layer of air between you and the sun's radiation, thus reducing how much heat makes it to your body, thus you stay cooler. Synthetics are the best at this though, as can be designed specifically with temperature control in mind.
Well good for you--please feel free to wear a nice woolen sweater in 90 degree intense heat.

We'll be happy to point and gain a laugh at your stupidity.

Just don't darken MY personal realms of welcome sunshine with your draconian dark agedness.

“Speaker of Mountain Wisdom....”

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Jun 28, 2013
 

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Mike Duquette wrote:
<quoted text>You have yet to even be specific about what my view is that is so detrimental to society? Still being vague.
I do not care about your feelings when they are being as bigoted as they are. I care about what others think, just not bigots.
You have yet to show evidence for any of your claims. But they are so darn vague, I could hardly even call them claims.
Time tells the tale... As I said the slippery slope tilts a bit with each slip.... And it starts already...

Polygamists consider the SCOTUS ruling a trail blazing ruling for consideration of Marriage being between several consenting adults... And when that is found valid then comes net slip followed shortly by the Animal Rights groups to give animals standing in the marital status....

http://www.mrc.org/articles/polygamy-advocate...

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