'Fox News Sunday' to Host Kentucky Se...

'Fox News Sunday' to Host Kentucky Senate Debate

There are 183193 comments on the thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com story from Oct 1, 2010, titled 'Fox News Sunday' to Host Kentucky Senate Debate. In it, thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com reports that:

"Fox News Sunday" is heading to Louisville, Ky. Jack Conway, Kentucky's attorney general and the Democratic candidate for Senate , and Rand Paul, the Republican nominee and son of Representative Ron Paul, Republican of Texas, have agreed to a live debate on "Fox News Sunday" on Oct.3 at 9 a.m. (Eastern time).

Join the discussion below, or Read more at thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com.

Since: Oct 11

Middlesboro, KY

#107344 Jun 29, 2013
Religion and the Constitution
When the Constitution was submitted to the American public, "many pious people" complained that the document had slighted God, for it contained "no recognition of his mercies to us ... or even of his existence." The Constitution was reticent about religion for two reasons: many delegates were committed federalists who believed that the power to legislate on religion, if it existed at all, lay within the domain of the state, not the national, governments. Second, the delegates believed that it would be a tactical mistake to insert such a politically controversial issue as religion in the Constitution. The only "religious clause" in the document -- the proscription of religious tests as qualifications for federal office in Article Six -- was, in fact, intended to defuse controversy by disarming potential critics who might claim religious discrimination in eligibility for public office.

Religion and the Bill of Rights
Although there were proposals for making the ratification of the Constitution contingent on the prior adoption of a bill of rights, supporters of a bill of rights acquiesced with the understanding that the first Congress under the new government would attempt to add to it a bill of rights.

James Madison took the lead in steering a bill of rights through the First Federal Congress, which convened in the spring of 1789. The Virginia Ratifying Convention and Madison's constituents, among whom there were large numbers of Baptists who wanted freedom of religion secured, expected him to push for a bill of rights. There was considerable opposition in Congress to a bill of rights of any sort on the grounds that it was "unnecessary and dangerous." The persistence of Madison and his allies nevertheless carried the day and on Sept. 28, 1789, both houses of Congress voted to send 12 amendments to the states. Those ratified by the requisite three fourths of the states became in December 1791 the first ten amendments to the Constitution.

Religion was addressed in the First Amendment in the following familiar words: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion." In notes for his speech, June 8, 1789, introducing the bill of rights, Madison indicated that a "national" religion was what he wanted to prevent and it is clear that most Americans joined him in considering that the major goal was to forestall any possibility that the federal government could act as several Colonies had done by choosing one religion and making it an official "national" religion that enjoyed exclusive financial and legal support. The establishment clause of the First Amendment meant at least this: that no one religion would be officially preferred above its competitors. What ever else it may -- or may not -- have meant is obscured by a lack of documentary evidence and is still a matter of dispute.

When you read real HISTORY you understand the reality
that truly exists and not some twisted view from a TV PERSONALITY!! Please?

PEACE
tofy
American Lady

Danville, KY

#107345 Jun 29, 2013
REP. GOHMERT SAYS TIME TO TAKE ON OBAMA ID FRAUD ISSUE

http://www.frequency.com/video/rep-gohmert-sa...

Since: Oct 11

Middlesboro, KY

#107346 Jun 29, 2013
Law wrote:
<quoted text>Agree except for the last word. You misspelled 'NORML'.:)
LOL..I STAND CORRECTED!
National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws ...NORML..LMAO!
Thanks!

“I Walk On Water”

Since: Apr 13

..Just to PROVE I can.....

#107347 Jun 29, 2013
American Lady wrote:
Christianity is not religion!
Christianity is Christ! Christianity is "Christ-in-you-ity." Jesus Christ did not found a religion to remember and reiterate His teaching. Christianity is the personal, spiritual presence of the risen and living Lord Jesus Christ, manifesting His life and character in Christians, i.e. "Christ-ones." Paul explained, "It is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me; and the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave Himself up for me" (Gal. 2:20).
http://www.christinyou.net/pages/Xnotrel.html
Galatians 2:20
I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not (u) I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the (x) flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.
(u) The same that I was before.
(x) In this mortal body.
http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/cmt/geneva/ga...
It's NOT a bunch of 'idols!'
Christ-in-you...sexy
American Lady

Danville, KY

#107349 Jun 29, 2013
this ones for you wrote:
Religion and the Constitution
When the Constitution was submitted to the American public, "many pious people" complained that the document had slighted God, for it contained "no recognition of his mercies to us ... or even of his existence." The Constitution was reticent about religion for two reasons: many delegates were committed federalists who believed that the power to legislate on religion, if it existed at all, lay within the domain of the state, not the national, governments. Second, the delegates believed that it would be a tactical mistake to insert such a politically controversial issue as religion in the Constitution. The only "religious clause" in the document -- the proscription of religious tests as qualifications for federal office in Article Six -- was, in fact, intended to defuse controversy by disarming potential critics who might claim religious discrimination in eligibility for public office.
Religion and the Bill of Rights
Although there were proposals for making the ratification of the Constitution contingent on the prior adoption of a bill of rights, supporters of a bill of rights acquiesced with the understanding that the first Congress under the new government would attempt to add to it a bill of rights.
James Madison took the lead in steering a bill of rights through the First Federal Congress, which convened in the spring of 1789. The Virginia Ratifying Convention and Madison's constituents, among whom there were large numbers of Baptists who wanted freedom of religion secured, expected him to push for a bill of rights. There was considerable opposition in Congress to a bill of rights of any sort on the grounds that it was "unnecessary and dangerous." The persistence of Madison and his allies nevertheless carried the day and on Sept. 28, 1789, both houses of Congress voted to send 12 amendments to the states. Those ratified by the requisite three fourths of the states became in December 1791 the first ten amendments to the Constitution.
Religion was addressed in the First Amendment in the following familiar words: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion." In notes for his speech, June 8, 1789, introducing the bill of rights, Madison indicated that a "national" religion was what he wanted to prevent and it is clear that most Americans joined him in considering that the major goal was to forestall any possibility that the federal government could act as several Colonies had done by choosing one religion and making it an official "national" religion that enjoyed exclusive financial and legal support. The establishment clause of the First Amendment meant at least this: that no one religion would be officially preferred above its competitors. What ever else it may -- or may not -- have meant is obscured by a lack of documentary evidence and is still a matter of dispute.
When you read real HISTORY you understand the reality
that truly exists and not some twisted view from a TV PERSONALITY!! Please?
PEACE
tofy
“Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”
- John Adams 2ND President of The United States

John Adams (1735-1826)
President of the United States (1797-1801)
A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America, 1787

John Adams was in London serving as a diplomat for his young country in 1787. He wrote and published A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America in three volumes.
http://hua.umf.maine.edu/Reading_Revolutions/...

The Bible and Government
Biblical Principles: Basis for America's Laws
http://www.faithfacts.org/christ-and-the-cult...

Biblical origins of American Political Philosophy
by
John A. Sterling
http://www.lawandliberty.org/history1.htm

Separation of church and state is NOT in the Constitution like many think! Including 'you' evidently!

“I Walk On Water”

Since: Apr 13

..Just to PROVE I can.....

#107351 Jun 29, 2013
American Lady wrote:
REP. GOHMERT SAYS TIME TO TAKE ON OBAMA ID FRAUD ISSUE
http://www.frequency.com/video/rep-gohmert-sa...
Gohmert?
Surprise...surprise...surprise !
Gol..ol..OL..leee
ShaZaaaam!
Tommy Boy

Westerville, OH

#107352 Jun 29, 2013
American Lady wrote:
REP. GOHMERT SAYS TIME TO TAKE ON OBAMA ID FRAUD ISSUE
http://www.frequency.com/video/rep-gohmert-sa...
BREAKING NEWS:
Obama wins 2016 Election thanks in large part to Birthers who never have and never will understand the Constitution, Religion, Term Limits, or Where toilet goes when their done sipping it.
American Lady

Danville, KY

#107353 Jun 29, 2013
Things That Are Not In the U.S. Constitution

* The Separation Of Church and State

The phrase "separation of church and state" does not appear anywhere in the Constitution. Thomas Jefferson wrote that the 1st Amendment erected a "wall of separation" between the church and the state (James Madison said it "drew a line," but it is Jefferson's term that sticks with us today). The phrase is commonly thought to mean that the government should not establish, support, or otherwise involve itself in any religion. The Religion Topic Page addresses this issue in much greater detail.
Thanks to Pat Roche for the idea.

* The Air Force
* Congressional Districts
* The Electoral College
* Executive Order
* Executive Privilege
* Freedom of Expression
*(Absolute) Freedom of Speech and Press
* "From each according to his ability..."
* God
* Immigration
* Impeachment means removal from office
* Innocent until proven guilty
* It's a free country
* Judicial Review
* Jury of Peers
* "Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness"
* Marriage
* Martial Law
* No taxation without representation
* Number of Justices in the Supreme Court
* "Of the people, by the people, for the people"
* Paper Money
* Political Parties
* Primary Elections
* Qualifications for Judges
* The right to privacy
* The right to travel
* The right to vote
* The separation of church and state <<--<<<
* The Separation of Powers Clause
* Slavery
* "We hold these truths to be self-evident"

http://www.usconstitution.net/constnot.html

These have ALL BEEN DONE by 'legislation'...
WHAT we PAY our representatives TO DO!
American Lady

Danville, KY

#107354 Jun 29, 2013
Tommy Boy wrote:
<quoted text>
BREAKING NEWS:
Obama wins 2016 Election thanks in large part to Birthers who never have and never will understand the Constitution, Religion, Term Limits, or Where toilet goes when their done sipping it.
"You" are just a "drop in the ocean" of "waste water of libTARDS!"

Since: Oct 11

Middlesboro, KY

#107355 Jun 29, 2013
ATTENTION AL:
Well make history in the shape you want.
So you can justify meaningless attempts to pervert
the founding father's true intent of our constitution.

Maybe it makes you sleep better at night, thinking your interpretation is correct...so be it then.

It's seems everything you post is a twisted version of the facts...WHY? I DON'T KNOW!

So you're on the winning team I guess?

Look around as you say...we the people are winning...and struggle after struggle is ending and equality for all is coming into BEING!

That's the true reality! Deal with it!

PEACE
tofy
Tommy Boy

Westerville, OH

#107356 Jun 29, 2013
American Lady wrote:
<quoted text>
"You" are just a "drop in the ocean" of "waste water of libTARDS!"
Actually I'm an uber conservative staunch Republican, who goes to a church called St James and finds you an embarrassment to everything I hold true
nothing to hide

Tampa, FL

#107357 Jun 29, 2013
 Libra

You're being wonderfully diplomatic today, Libra, and you'll be able to talk yourself out of any tight spots that you happen to find yourself in. This will be just what the doctor ordered if you need to come up with a nifty excuse for something. It's also a good day for talking about your feelings with someone you respect and admire.
American Lady

Danville, KY

#107358 Jun 29, 2013
this ones for you wrote:
When you read real HISTORY you understand the reality
that truly exists and not some twisted view from a TV PERSONALITY!! Please?
PEACE
tofy
I do NOT listen to ANY "TV PERSONALITY" ...

I go STRAIGHT to the Source ...
The Geneva Bible ...

Which was brought over by the Pilgrims ...
IT actually has "The Word of God" in IT!
That's the History I "love" to read

<3

You do things 'your' way ...
I'll do them 'mine'...

Peace Out ...

Since: Oct 11

Middlesboro, KY

#107359 Jun 29, 2013
Before I go....
A special....HOLA!
To a friend of mine...miss you!:)
PEACE
tofy

“I Walk On Water”

Since: Apr 13

..Just to PROVE I can.....

#107360 Jun 29, 2013
American Lady wrote:
<quoted text>
"You" are just a "drop in the ocean" of "waste water of libTARDS!"
eloquent
American Lady

Danville, KY

#107361 Jun 29, 2013
Tommy Boy wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually I'm an uber conservative staunch Republican, who goes to a church called St James and finds you an embarrassment to everything I hold true
I do NOT go to any particular one.
As a matter of fact, I've found many hypocrites in lots of them, so I do not socialize with them.

I trust in Him and in what He says!
God 'knows' WHAT is in my heart!
That's ALL that counts to me!

Sticks and stones
may break my bones
BUT your words
will NEVER hurt :)

You have already 'sinned' by judging ME!
That church must NOT BE doing you ANY good ...

:)
American Lady

Danville, KY

#107362 Jun 29, 2013
Ta ta for now ...
Think I'll go 'uptown'...
SEE what's happening there.

Rather 'boring' here :)

Since: Dec 11

.

#107363 Jun 29, 2013
this ones for you wrote:
Religion and the Constitution
When the Constitution was submitted to the American public, "many pious people" complained that the document had slighted God, for it contained "no recognition of his mercies to us ... or even of his existence." The Constitution was reticent about religion for two reasons: many delegates were committed federalists who believed that the power to legislate on religion, if it existed at all, lay within the domain of the state, not the national, governments. Second, the delegates believed that it would be a tactical mistake to insert such a politically controversial issue as religion in the Constitution. The only "religious clause" in the document -- the proscription of religious tests as qualifications for federal office in Article Six -- was, in fact, intended to defuse controversy by disarming potential critics who might claim religious discrimination in eligibility for public office.
Religion and the Bill of Rights
Although there were proposals for making the ratification of the Constitution contingent on the prior adoption of a bill of rights, supporters of a bill of rights acquiesced with the understanding that the first Congress under the new government would attempt to add to it a bill of rights.
James Madison took the lead in steering a bill of rights through the First Federal Congress, which convened in the spring of 1789. The Virginia Ratifying Convention and Madison's constituents, among whom there were large numbers of Baptists who wanted freedom of religion secured, expected him to push for a bill of rights. There was considerable opposition in Congress to a bill of rights of any sort on the grounds that it was "unnecessary and dangerous." The persistence of Madison and his allies nevertheless carried the day and on Sept. 28, 1789, both houses of Congress voted to send 12 amendments to the states. Those ratified by the requisite three fourths of the states became in December 1791 the first ten amendments to the Constitution.
Religion was addressed in the First Amendment in the following familiar words: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion." In notes for his speech, June 8, 1789, introducing the bill of rights, Madison indicated that a "national" religion was what he wanted to prevent and it is clear that most Americans joined him in considering that the major goal was to forestall any possibility that the federal government could act as several Colonies had done by choosing one religion and making it an official "national" religion that enjoyed exclusive financial and legal support. The establishment clause of the First Amendment meant at least this: that no one religion would be officially preferred above its competitors. What ever else it may -- or may not -- have meant is obscured by a lack of documentary evidence and is still a matter of dispute.
When you read real HISTORY you understand the reality
that truly exists and not some twisted view from a TV PERSONALITY!! Please?
PEACE
tofy
Please see page 87:
"Franklin requests prayers in the Constitutional Convention"; Ben Franklin founder of the idea of public schools in America and the public library donated $10,000.00 dollars of his own money to be certain they all had Bibles!
The Separation of Church and State was intended to prevent the Federal government from establishing a national church like the Church of England, which used the church to prosecute and vilify political opponents.

http://books.google.com/books...
countrygirl

White Plains, KY

#107364 Jun 29, 2013
Aristocles son of Ariston wrote:
<quoted text>
Country Girl?
You tried to correct others, your above post is another "proof" of my own point!
Post Script: At least you used I correctly.
Is this wtf's sister "pony"?
Your "style' seems so familiar.
whatever. you so excited to be on
topix, you don't know half the BS you be writing.
where is your other half? shouldn't you be
trying to pleasure it. make it happy, somehow.
you sound so desperate for attention.
son of an A-hole. get your life!

Since: Dec 11

.

#107365 Jun 29, 2013
countrygirl wrote:
<quoted text> whatever. you so excited to be on
topix, you don't know half the BS you be writing.
where is your other half? shouldn't you be
trying to pleasure it. make it happy, somehow.
you sound so desperate for attention.
son of an A-hole. get your life!
My life is wonderful thank you, wife and kids are fine.
I have a long weekend, thanks for your concern.

Obama is your own worst enemy, not me.
Be sure to double check his frequently changing positions from day to day, you wouldn't want to get caught up in an NSA probe for comments on Topix would you?
As for myself; I think if a Conservative is not on a "watch list" they ought be ASHAMED!

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