Hundreds of birds die in western Ky.

Hundreds of birds die in western Ky.

There are 81698 comments on the The Cincinnati Enquirer story from Jan 5, 2011, titled Hundreds of birds die in western Ky.. In it, The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that:

MURRAY, Ky. - State wildlife officials say "several hundred" dead birds were found near the Murray State University campus last week.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Cincinnati Enquirer.

Anne

United States

#92338 Sep 4, 2013
The little civil war tidbits you've thrown out are interesting.
There's a town named Buckner off I-71 exit 18. Oldham county. I'm sure it's named for the General/Govener you told about. There are several instances where a rebel became politically successful after the war. No grudges seem to be held. A "come on over and eat with us" type of thing.
The Sister using "half and half" for pall bearers drives home the fact that while there was all that heart felt bloody fighting, we are still, at the end of the day, just people making a living, living side by side, doing the best we can . But war will be with us always. Cain and Abel for starters...
The Lovers Lane in Bowling Green. Wonder if its haunted? I'd guess "yes". Talking about trenches-- there's a buffalo trail/trench right behind my property.

Good Morning! Have a wonderful day! Beautiful day so far! Suns out and the fog of this September morn is lifting. Time for a row around the pond in the rising mist! See ya all later!
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92339 Sep 4, 2013
Anne wrote:
The little civil war tidbits you've thrown out are interesting.
There's a town named Buckner off I-71 exit 18. Oldham county. I'm sure it's named for the General/Govener you told about. There are several instances where a rebel became politically successful after the war. No grudges seem to be held. A "come on over and eat with us" type of thing.
The Sister using "half and half" for pall bearers drives home the fact that while there was all that heart felt bloody fighting, we are still, at the end of the day, just people making a living, living side by side, doing the best we can . But war will be with us always. Cain and Abel for starters...
The Lovers Lane in Bowling Green. Wonder if its haunted? I'd guess "yes". Talking about trenches-- there's a buffalo trail/trench right behind my property.
Good Morning! Have a wonderful day! Beautiful day so far! Suns out and the fog of this September morn is lifting. Time for a row around the pond in the rising mist! See ya all later!
Perhaps the sun will dry out the grass and I can mow later today. In the meantime, I did some research and it does appear that the town was named for Simon Bolivar Buckner, Confederate General and Subsequent Governor of Ketucky. Who himself was named for "Simon Jose Antonio de la Santisima Trinidad Bolivar y Palacios Ponte y Blanco"... more commonly known as Simon Bolivar, a brillant South American General who won Venzuelan independance from Spain... Their version of our own George Washington. Good day and enjoy the row boat ride.
John

Westerville, OH

#92340 Sep 4, 2013
He used a drone and forgot to lock the location.
John

Westerville, OH

#92342 Sep 4, 2013
His next attempt would be perfect.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92343 Sep 4, 2013
Ancient Wolf wrote:
<quoted text>Early morning typing is horrible. It was really 1854. LOL
I wonder if there are any civil war stories about the ladies of ill repute?
Surely the prostitutes had a role in the war
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92344 Sep 4, 2013
Miss E Font wrote:
<quoted text>
I wonder if there are any civil war stories about the ladies of ill repute?
Surely the prostitutes had a role in the war
Yes there were plenty, especially around the Army of the Potomac with one leader being Union General Joe "Hooker". While the term had been in use to describe these ladies previously, it became even more popular under Joe Hooker.

Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92345 Sep 4, 2013
Due to excessive drinking and carousing with "loose" women, Joe Hooker was relieved of his command and replaced by George Meade who was successful against R.E. Lee at Gettysburg primarily due to the efforts of General John Buford of Versailles Kentucky holding the high ground on the first day of that 3 day battle.

So yes, I would say that loose women did play a key role (roll lol) as did our own Kentucky Native.(His role was played by Sam Elliott in the movie).

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92346 Sep 4, 2013
Ancient Wolf wrote:
Due to excessive drinking and carousing with "loose" women, Joe Hooker was relieved of his command and replaced by George Meade who was successful against R.E. Lee at Gettysburg primarily due to the efforts of General John Buford of Versailles Kentucky holding the high ground on the first day of that 3 day battle.

So yes, I would say that loose women did play a key role (roll lol) as did our own Kentucky Native.(His role was played by Sam Elliott in the movie).
They always blame it on the women.
Thanks Wolf for the great stories.
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92347 Sep 4, 2013
Miss E Font wrote:
<quoted text>
They always blame it on the women.
Thanks Wolf for the great stories.
In this case, "They" would be Abraham Lincoln who took personal responsibility for having Joe Hooker relieved.

Glad you enjoyed the tidbits. I did do something besides sit on here all day, I mowed 2 acres of grass and used Topix time for breaks. LOL It was a great day to be alive and be outside. I think History contains many pieces of the puzzle that when assembled reflects a scene of who we are and why? Have a good evening.
strange

Lawrenceburg, KY

#92348 Sep 4, 2013
strange, the world is truly mysterious.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92349 Sep 4, 2013
Ancient Wolf wrote:
<quoted text>In this case, "They" would be Abraham Lincoln who took personal responsibility for having Joe Hooker relieved.

Glad you enjoyed the tidbits. I did do something besides sit on here all day, I mowed 2 acres of grass and used Topix time for breaks. LOL It was a great day to be alive and be outside. I think History contains many pieces of the puzzle that when assembled reflects a scene of who we are and why? Have a good evening.
I had an easy day at work. I changed jobs awhile back and am adjusting to having more time and less work.
It's a hard transition
Anne

Owensboro, KY

#92350 Sep 4, 2013
Miss E Font wrote:
<quoted text>
I had an easy day at work. I changed jobs awhile back and am adjusting to having more time and less work.
It's a hard transition
Hmmmm, more time and less work...That should be really hard to adjust to... JS. Lol

It was a wonderful day in my little world. Well almost. My neighbors dad that was in the motorcycle wreck passed away. He was 51. He had asked his wife to go on that last ride with him but she couldn't get away from work. Well, there went my smile. Sorry.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92351 Sep 4, 2013
Anne wrote:
<quoted text>Hmmmm, more time and less work...That should be really hard to adjust to... JS. Lol

It was a wonderful day in my little world. Well almost. My neighbors dad that was in the motorcycle wreck passed away. He was 51. He had asked his wife to go on that last ride with him but she couldn't get away from work. Well, there went my smile. Sorry.
Sad --- that's one reason I made a change in my workaholic ways. Missing too many of life's little moments.
Tollesboro Guy

Lexington, KY

#92352 Sep 4, 2013
Ancient Wolf wrote:
<quoted text>
It is reported that Harriet Beecher Stowe (sister of Abolitionist Henry Ward Beecher and author of Uncle Tom's Cabin) visited your area in 1833 and observed a slave auction which is depicted in her novel.
Enough history, now time to feed chickens and get ready to mow grass. LOL
There is a cabin on US68 on the way to Lexington that proclaims it is the ACTUAL CABIN where Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote "Uncle Tom's Cabin". Historical Plaque and all! Well preserved by the KY Historical Society. It's right after Maysville and right at the Washington red light.(If that tells you anything) I 'spect you could use Google Earth 3D and walk around it.
Anne

Owensboro, KY

#92353 Sep 4, 2013
Miss E Font wrote:
<quoted text>
Sad --- that's one reason I made a change in my workaholic ways. Missing too many of life's little moments.
Yes. I understand that. It's good to take time to smell the roses. life seems to fly by pretty fast and its up to each of us to find the beauty in our lives before its too late

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#92354 Sep 4, 2013
So, did anyone ever figure out why all of the birds died?

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92355 Sep 4, 2013
just an allusion wrote:
So, did anyone ever figure out why all of the birds died?
So all of us could come to this thread and meet each other. Finding new friends to chat and share with, it was all part of a grander scheme

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#92356 Sep 4, 2013
Miss E Font wrote:
<quoted text>
So all of us could come to this thread and meet each other. Finding new friends to chat and share with, it was all part of a grander scheme
Ah, well, I don't mean to take a morbid tone on this, but it occurs to me that, if this incident actually happened, then we should all be concerned and invest a bit of effort into discerning the cause.

Afterall, if there IS something out there that is causing the sudden death of anyone or anything within its vicinity, then we could wind up 'chatting' about all of those "new friends" we met online who aren't with us anymore because no one bothered to exercise a little effort into discovering the cause of the bird deaths...

Just saying.
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92357 Sep 5, 2013
Tollesboro Guy wrote:
<quoted text>
There is a cabin on US68 on the way to Lexington that proclaims it is the ACTUAL CABIN where Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote "Uncle Tom's Cabin". Historical Plaque and all! Well preserved by the KY Historical Society. It's right after Maysville and right at the Washington red light.(If that tells you anything) I 'spect you could use Google Earth 3D and walk around it.
There are several places throughout the state that lay claim to being the actual cabin where she "wrote" her book. I suspect she visited several cabins-areas, but did not "write" in any of them.

That is why I stated that "it was reported" that she had visited a slave market around Maysville which is a strong possibility since that was a "jumping off" point for run-aways crossing into Ohio over the river and many were recaptured by bounty hunters along the Maysville-Lexington Turnpike.
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92358 Sep 5, 2013
It would not have been uncommon for Harriet Beecher Stowe to visit several places that could have had some bearing on her 1851-52 book "Uncle Tom's Cabin". She was born in Connecticut but moved to Cincinnati at the age of 21 where she was a schoolteacher and novelist. She returned to Hartford after 1863.

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