Hundreds of birds die in western Ky.

Hundreds of birds die in western Ky.

There are 81703 comments on the The Cincinnati Enquirer story from Jan 5, 2011, titled Hundreds of birds die in western Ky.. In it, The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that:

MURRAY, Ky. - State wildlife officials say "several hundred" dead birds were found near the Murray State University campus last week.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Cincinnati Enquirer.

Curious

Olive Hill, KY

#91475 Aug 5, 2013
Wow, this thread has 77,042 comments! Just curious if anyone has read them all?
yeah right

West Liberty, KY

#91476 Aug 5, 2013
is that the wolfe county game warden dont tread
I know that is where you live
tbone wrote:
gamewarden is looking 4 a lot of men they are packing naround dead birds
Anne

United States

#91477 Aug 5, 2013
Misty eyed wrote:
<quoted text> A fantastic cheese is smoked gouda. Such a nice Lady to feed the Folks;) I enjoy your stories. I'm just wondering...Do you have frogs in your pond? And fish? Is there a lot of maintenance to upkeep a pond? Thanks. I would like a pond for the ducks and such.
Yes. Lots of frogs. Quick funny story: our driveway goes past the pond. One night after dark my adult daughter and I had driven the car up the long driveway to check the construction on the house. There's a couple dips and "hills" in the driveway. We were back in the car and headed back to the main road when the headlights hit several frogs in the driveway. I stopped. "OMG, look at all those frogs! Look there's more ..and more coming out of the grass onto the road! Wow, about 20 of them! Look!.....oh, oh, they're...they're...Mating! " Us city slickers got us a country education that night! Btw, its a crazy meet and greet situation. Lol
Anne

United States

#91478 Aug 5, 2013
Misty eyed wrote:
<quoted text> A fantastic cheese is smoked gouda. Such a nice Lady to feed the Folks;) I enjoy your stories. I'm just wondering...Do you have frogs in your pond? And fish? Is there a lot of maintenance to upkeep a pond? Thanks. I would like a pond for the ducks and such.
I love the pond! It's about 6 years old now. Had a leak problem at first but my pond guy fixed it -- no charge as he said he would do it if it leaked. I've stocked it with bass, hybrid bluegill, bluegill and red ear. I feed them fish pellets everyday.. Very relaxing to watch! My main dock is 16' square- with a roof. And there's a 6' walkway around 3 sides and is one foot lower than the main dock.( made the first dock too high out of the water.. Lol) then i put a dock ladder into the water so the kids can get out of the water easier. I've got an old row boat that gives me exercise a couple times a week . I have big frogs now.. Wonder why? Lol. But there's a nasty weed I need to find a way to get rid of . Canadian geese brings on a lot of unwanted seeds I love to watch them swim but they poop way too much and I don't want them nesting
Anne

United States

#91479 Aug 5, 2013
@Nope: this sinkhole business is crazy. In southern indiana there are a lot of caves and sometimes there are sinkholes around them. There's a state park with several caves and if you walk along the trails you will see sinkholes that go down into the caves.
This happens around the underground coal mines a lot. Kentucky home insurance companies usually offer insurance for this possibility. But it's one type of policy you never want to use. It's a scary thing to happen and I hope your situation has a good ending. Have you had it checked out?
Anne

United States

#91480 Aug 5, 2013
Misty eyed wrote:
<quoted text>
Pulled pork sandwiches with pickles so good. I use the Hawaiian sub rolls as well.
Oh, yeah!

“Is who I am”

Since: Aug 08

Scottsville

#91481 Aug 5, 2013
Hope you all had a good day! It was busy here. Life flies when you are having fun I suppose.
Tollesboro Guy

Olive Hill, KY

#91482 Aug 5, 2013
RoamingInsomniac wrote:
Hope you all had a good day! It was busy here. Life flies when you are having fun I suppose.
It was awesome here in Tollesboro! Got up to around 85 but humidity was only 20%. I got out of the office by 6 and played until dark-thirty. Threw sticks for the 6 month of German Shepherd, he is HUGE! We call him the Branch Manager.

Tomorrow, going to be humid but must break out both riding mowers and hit this six acre yard.If I start after dew dries I can get caught up at work by late afternoon!
Misty eyed

Louisa, KY

#91484 Aug 5, 2013
Anne wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh, yeah!
Might sound gross, but I added sauerkraut on those sandwiches as well. Yummy;) That pond and those frogs sound like a place to be. Reminds me of a Duck Dynasty episode of the guys sneaking onto to the golf course under the cover of darkness getting frogs from the pond. Lol. Frog mating, now that is hilarious. Hahaha. Can't say I've seen 'em.
Faire night to All...Still no Abeliever. Hmmm.
Anne

United States

#91486 Aug 5, 2013
Tollesboro Guy wrote:
<quoted text>
It was awesome here in Tollesboro! Got up to around 85 but humidity was only 20%. I got out of the office by 6 and played until dark-thirty. Threw sticks for the 6 month of German Shepherd, he is HUGE! We call him the Branch Manager.
Tomorrow, going to be humid but must break out both riding mowers and hit this six acre yard.If I start after dew dries I can get caught up at work by late afternoon!
I'm gonna use that "dark-thirty" in my vocabulary starting tomorrow --well, later today. Good descriptive phrase.
As far as mowing I don't know how many acres I mow but it takes 4 hours on the riding mower.
Branch Manager? BM for short? "sorry..couldnt pass that up"
It's late, I'm slap happy, need to shut up. Have a good sleep, bird threaders!
Mississippi Man

Olive Branch, MS

#91487 Aug 5, 2013
(I see this was a "no show" when I tried to post it before so I'll try again......will have nothing to do with nothing now, oh well.

A little bitty tear let me down,
Spoiled my act as a clown..........Why is Rapp called music by some people anyway?

Ya know, if we were ever poor I just don't remember it. The folks always provided a roof over our heads, plenty to eat, and clothes to wear. Sure, some of the knees were neatly patched up but Mom always washed, starched and ironed all our clothes. I think some of ya all have mentioned that also. When the Belle and I were first married I told her that "I'll build you a real long clothes line right over there." ......and she said WHY. I didn't build any clothes line but I've always thought (and felt) that line dried sheets felt so good,........but maybe not towels.

But I've gotta say this. As I look back to my younger years I honestly think that Mom planned every meal around POTATOES! Now I can stand right straight and say this. The folks always planted according to the moon and I didn't understand that either. But every year there came this special Saturday that was meant just to be potato planting Saturday. Now,.......I hated bring'n those left-over potatoes out from the cellar, I hated cut'n them between the eyes, I hated planting those things, I hated hoeing the weeds out of them barefooted, I hated digg'n them up with a fork, I hated put'n 'em back in the cellar, I hated to go get 'em when Mom needed some and I hated eat'n mashed potatoes. Look'n back, now I wish (sorta) I could do it all again. One things for sure. I would be much more appreciative!!! PS,...Burger King has the BEST french fries, for shore!!!!!
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#91490 Aug 6, 2013
@Mississippi Man.. meals here centered around pinto beans with a dutch oven pot full on the stove at all times. Summer time it was on the outdoor wood burner on the back porch.
We were not poor either, just had no money or much need for it. Why we were rich when the 1952 tobacco crop sold for $400. LOL
Potatoes were always planted on Good Friday or as near as possible, in case of rain. Fresh meats were fried chicken or wild game on Sundays. I was a teen before I ever had a hamburger and 20 years old before I knew about pizza. LOL
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#91492 Aug 6, 2013
Poor old John must live with the pr lady and wants someone to talk to her so that he won't have to. Especially, since he does not have much to say anyways. LOL
Misty eyed

Louisa, KY

#91494 Aug 6, 2013
Ancient Wolf wrote:
@Mississippi Man.. meals here centered around pinto beans with a dutch oven pot full on the stove at all times. Summer time it was on the outdoor wood burner on the back porch.
We were not poor either, just had no money or much need for it. Why we were rich when the 1952 tobacco crop sold for $400. LOL
Potatoes were always planted on Good Friday or as near as possible, in case of rain. Fresh meats were fried chicken or wild game on Sundays. I was a teen before I ever had a hamburger and 20 years old before I knew about pizza. LOL
I've been thinking it was the pinto beans, homemade vegetable soup and cabbage that kept me skinny/ healthy all those years. We did our weedeating with scythes- a sharp blade shaped like a big fish hook- if that is the proper term. We'd wack weeds several days a week, all summer long. Never coplaining about the blisters. Lol. I think, if I lived like that again ; these excess pounds might shed.
As far as you tobacco, did your family use what was produced? Partner and I think making your own tobacco might be a better alternative, a small crop perhaps. Love hearing your stories;)
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#91495 Aug 6, 2013
Misty eyed wrote:
<quoted text> I've been thinking it was the pinto beans, homemade vegetable soup and cabbage that kept me skinny/ healthy all those years. We did our weedeating with scythes- a sharp blade shaped like a big fish hook- if that is the proper term. We'd wack weeds several days a week, all summer long. Never coplaining about the blisters. Lol. I think, if I lived like that again ; these excess pounds might shed.
As far as you tobacco, did your family use what was produced? Partner and I think making your own tobacco might be a better alternative, a small crop perhaps. Love hearing your stories;)
I still eat and like the pinto beans and still use the scythe (or how ever you spell it) and was just out whacking weeds this morning, then came in and put up some more sweet corn. The only neighbor here in the boondocks lived to be 103 and whacked the weeds manually up until about age 100 and still farmed with a team of mules. I miss seeing that old man and sometimes go to Youtube and listen to Walter Brennan doing "That Mule, Old Rivers, and Me". That song brings back fond memories of that old neighbor. He also picked a guitar and Tom T. Hall's song "I remember the year Clayton Delaney died" has memories. I especially like the line that says "It could be that the GOOD LORD likes a little music too".

Tobacco was the main money crop, although my grandpa (Before my time) raised hemp and sold it to the government to make ropes for the ships prior to WW2. It still grows wild around here. They did use some of the tobacco themselves. Grandpappy caught me and the cousin sneaking a smoke on a store bought cigarette and said "Come on boys, if you are going to smoke, let's go do it like real men". He took us down to the barn and hand rolled a cigar and made us smoke it until we turned green. LOL Even my grandmother smoked it in a corncob pipe. I don't think the tobacco back then had all the chemicals and if one is going to smoke it, it would probably be better to smoke the home grown natural leaf.
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#91496 Aug 6, 2013
In the old days, tobacco farmers had more help than they do now. They had big families and neighbors to help with the cutting, housing, stripping, etc. Schools never even started until mid-September so the farmers could get the tobacco cut and housed otherwise the kids did not go anyways until it was done.

In winter, the wood and brush were accumulated to burn the tobacco beds to retard the weeds. Now it is chemicals. In mid-May, the "sucker" growth and blooms were removed so the main leafs would get the nutrients. The big green tobacco worms were removed by hand plucking. Now, more chemicals. Tobacco was cut and hung on sticks hanging from the rafters to dry and then wait for a rainy day for the tobacco to come in "case" for stripping. Untelling what chemicals are being used to make the cigarette papers. In the old days, it was handrolled cigars or smoked in pipes.

“Is who I am”

Since: Aug 08

Scottsville

#91497 Aug 6, 2013
Another beautiful day here!!
Hop you all had a good one!
yuppp

Lexington, KY

#91498 Aug 6, 2013
you too
fifties farm boy

United States

#91502 Aug 6, 2013
Ancient Wolf wrote:
In the old days, tobacco farmers had more help than they do now. They had big families and neighbors to help with the cutting, housing, stripping, etc. Schools never even started until mid-September so the farmers could get the tobacco cut and housed otherwise the kids did not go anyways until it was done.
In winter, the wood and brush were accumulated to burn the tobacco beds to retard the weeds. Now it is chemicals. In mid-May, the "sucker" growth and blooms were removed so the main leafs would get the nutrients. The big green tobacco worms were removed by hand plucking. Now, more chemicals. Tobacco was cut and hung on sticks hanging from the rafters to dry and then wait for a rainy day for the tobacco to come in "case" for stripping. Untelling what chemicals are being used to make the cigarette papers. In the old days, it was handrolled cigars or smoked in pipes.
My family left the Ky farm and went north for a few years in the early to mid forties but we came back to the old farm at the beginning of 1953. I was 10 yrs old at the time.

We were a big family. We had the usual mix for a small ky farm of the day, a few cows for milk and butter, and a little milk to sell to a truck that ran a daily route, a couple pigs for meat, chickens in the yard for eggs and meat, and a big garden to eat from and to put up food for winter. Plus, an occasional squirrel or rabbit, killed and fried, was a welcome change at he dinner table.

Tobacco was our money crop. We raised our own and rented all we could to raise close to home. We farmed with horses.

Toxaphene and ddt were used routinely by farmers to control bugs and worms on the tobacco by the mid fifties. I suppose you all pretty much are familiar with ddt.

Toxaphene is a poison made by reacting chlorine gas with a substance called camphene. The resulting product (toxaphene) is a mixture of hundreds of different chlorinated camphenes and related chemicals. Toxaphene does not break down quickly. It stays in the soil for years.

In the mid fifties ddt and toxaphene were applied to the tobacco in the form of dust, applied when the tobacco was small from a can with holes in the bottom which was attached loosely to a short stick so that a little downward motion followed by a quick stop would slap the can against the bottom end of the stick and shake out an appropriate amount of dust.

Later as the tobacco got bigger, the dust was shaken onto the tobacco from a cloth bag covering the leaves with dust. It is a miracle that we all didn't die from exposure to these highly toxic dusts.

By the late fifties (I think) both those chemical poisons had been replaced, for use on tobacco, over health concerns. Toxaphene was banned all across the USA sometime in the 1990s.

I can remember pulling worms off and killing them sometimes, but that was not our primary method of controlling them. By the late sixties, a pump up 3 gallon compressed air sprayer with a mix of water and chemicals were our main method of pest control. At that point in time most of the tobacco sprays were a form of nerve agent. A dose of that and a tobacco worm didn't last long.

Through the forties, fifties, and early sixties, suckers were pretty much broken out by hand. Then around the end of the sixties, spray on chemical sucker control became common. By that time chemical treatment of the soil for preparing plant beds was pretty much the accepted practice as well. Things were getting a little easier for the tobacco farmer.

By the mid seventies I had figured out that there were much easier ways to make a living than raising tobacco. From that point on I worked at a job in town, raised some beef cattle, and let someone else raise my tobacco base.

In spite of the hard work and the hardships, I have many fond memories of those "good old days". I will never forget moms "home cooking" and the joys of growing up in the country.

Thank God I'm a country boy !

Ancient Wolf

Nicholasville, KY

#91503 Aug 7, 2013
@ fifties farm boy.. I am about the same age as you and our lives have been almost a reverse. What I wrote about were the processes of the 40s and 50s prior to the use of chemicals in tobacco production.

About the same time that your family returned to the country, we had to leave. Grandpappy passed on and the hillside farm was sold including the 4 room shack in the bottom land where we lived without electricity and running water. My dad took a town job with a regular income and even bought a car and some electrical appliances.

God has blessed me with a long term career in Information Technology and upon retiring, I was able to buy back just that small piece of bottom land and personally remodel that old shack mainly using used lumber and materials and it now has most of the conveniences while still retaining it's original character. But I can look out the window and see Grandpappy's old farm that is now just pasture land and woods and recall all the "Ghosts" of my youth.(I don't own that old farm but just the shack and enough acreage to raise a lot of sweet corn and a flock of chickens).

I started here and I will end up here. The prodigal son has returned.

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