OK Health Care Freedom Amendment, Sta...

OK Health Care Freedom Amendment, State Question 756

Created by CitizenTopix on Oct 11, 2010

1,568 votes

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No

Other (explain below)

Justaminute

Oklahoma City, OK

#46845 Aug 29, 2013
So What

I left something off of my list too, they group from the 50's and 60's also gave us the 'no fault' divorce as well.

And those were the last generations to have a good career with a high school education.

And then they got convinced to throw away something their parents gave them and that was unions. And our salaries have never recovered.
WarForOil

Grapevine, TX

#46846 Aug 29, 2013
Justaminute wrote:
So What
that group from the 50's and 60's also gave us the 'no fault' divorce as well.

And those were the last generations to have a good career with a high school education.

And our salaries have never recovered.
They were the last overpaid underqualified generation.
Thankfully high school grads aren't worth much now.

Just because you got muscle don't mean you got money.
Volunteer for the Army, they need muscle.

Dumb like Dad don't cut it anymore.
Justaminute

Oklahoma City, OK

#46847 Aug 29, 2013
Looks like the Repubs want to hold us hostage again.

October is the debt limit dance again.

Who needs a recovery?

Well Obamacare is not the only thing on the chopping block, it's Obamacare, Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid.

I guess that sequester wasn't enough.

Let's see take more money out of the pockets of the Middle Class and what do we have?

Oh yeah, they have less money to spend.

You know there's a reason why Republicans in charge of government have never worked our economically well for the people who have to live under them.

Because it's damn dumb. It's abject stupidity.

We should be spending not cutting.

You know when we started our business, we had nothing but debt. But that debt gave us the opportunity to make money. And have a business.

Borrowing money, the interest is at all time lows.

So how much interest do you have off of your savings account, if you have one? Chump change.

And your a chump if your buying what they are trying to sell you.
Justaminute

Oklahoma City, OK

#46848 Aug 29, 2013
WarForOil wrote:
<quoted text>
They were the last overpaid underqualified generation.
Thankfully high school grads aren't worth much now.
Just because you got muscle don't mean you got money.
Volunteer for the Army, they need muscle.
Dumb like Dad don't cut it anymore.
Nah, that's not true in every case.

It was having a good idea.

But know good idea's are in short supply.
Justaminute

Oklahoma City, OK

#46849 Aug 29, 2013
Why I know that we are lacking in good ideas is the rest of the world is catching up to us off of our good ideas.

Let's talk about Iran for instance.

We were supposedly killing them with those embargoes.

Well, with oil and a population that wants the good life too even if they have to live under less than optimal conditions.

They are buying like crazy.

And so is the rest of the world.

From China

In my husband's hometown of Shiraz, they have been building malls like crazy and new business. Every one has one.

The newest mall is like the Mall of America, almost 900 stores with amusement rides and 2 levels just for restaurants.

The same things are happening through out the Far East in places like Thailand and Indonesia.

You know the saying "You snooze, you lose."

We have been snoozing to long.

You don't save your way to prosperity.

Nor do you get prospers buy sinking all your money in your military.

When every one has a college education, we are still going to need a garbage man but he'll make some damn good money.
Justaminute

Oklahoma City, OK

#46850 Aug 29, 2013
Okay you doofuses worry about the debt and those that are smarter than you will use the money sitting out there that is almost 1 or 2% to borrow and get rich off it.

Your standard of living is on the decline.

And so is your infrastructure.

Our country is in serious need of investment.

So instead of saying we are all in this together your turning it over to privatization and those one's that use the money at 1@ interest will own everything.

But sit there with your guns but you know just how good is a gun when every body has one?
WaqForOil

Grapevine, TX

#46851 Aug 29, 2013
Justaminute wrote:
<quoted text>
Just because you got muscle don't mean you got money.

Nah, that's not true in every case.
It was having a good idea.
But know good idea's are in short supply.
So true, some muscle got money.
Are you one of those rich athletes
with sports related brain damage ?

Some of us do have good ideas, and
become rich. Moi.
Justaminute

Oklahoma City, OK

#46852 Aug 29, 2013
We have some exceeding good opportunities to move this country forward.

China is not building up their arsenal to fight us, their having trouble containing their own citizens.

The Middle East too.

Just like this stupid idea about Bombing Syria.

"It's unlawful to kill people with gas, they have to be killed with only approved measures." So we are going to kill you with approved measures. Bombs. Like God intended."

We have enough to maintain our security.

Now we need to get to work.
Packing Heat

Vinita, OK

#46853 Aug 29, 2013
Justaminute wrote:
<quoted text>Why I know that we are lacking in good ideas is the rest of the world is catching up to us off of our good ideas.

Since you have babbled out a bunch of nonsense, I'll address each on its own posting in hopes of showing you that your liberal bullshit has more holes than Swiss Cheese!

Really? Who and What Idea's are they stealing?
What makes our situation even more remarkable is that, unlike some other countries, the U.S. has many, many small businesses where the only "employee" is also the owner. Freelancers, consultants, one-man-band landscapers, and the like often incorporate for liability and tax purposes.

There are some studies of global entrepreneurship where the U.S. leads the pack. When the World Bank tallied up the average number of newly registered limited liability companies across the globe between 2005 and 2009, it found we had one of the highest startup rates per 1,000 people, in a league with Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom.

The U.S. also finished tops for entrepreneurial activity among advanced countries in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor's 2011 annual report, which makes estimates about start-up businesses formation across the world based on a 140,000 person survey. By their account, about 12 percent of U.S. adults run businesses that are less than three and a half years old, compared to 6.9 percent on average in other so-called "innovation-driven" economies. One reason this study might find such different results from the OECD is that the survey counts any kind of business, whether or not it pays employees, as entrepreneurial activity. That's a big deal in the United States, where about three quarters of all firms have zero payroll. Those businesses often belong to self-employed individuals who haven't needed to incorporate.

Some of the most cutting-edge young companies in the world call Silicon Valley, New York, Boston, and Austin, Texas home, partly because we have the financial backers to support them. According to the OECD, the U.S. ranks second overall in venture capital invested as a percentage of GDP, which wedges us between Israel at No. 1 and Sweden at No. 3. In sheer dollars, we dwarf everyone.
Packing Heat

Vinita, OK

#46854 Aug 29, 2013
Justaminute wrote:
<quoted text>Let's talk about Iran for instance.
We were supposedly killing them with those embargoes.
Well, with oil and a population that wants the good life too even if they have to live under less than optimal conditions.
They are buying like crazy.

Well... except that is absolute bullshit on its face! When did things turn around, last weekend?
Iran’s economic crisis deepens as Rouhani prepares to take office...
August 2, 2013
Iran’s economy is showing signs of foundering just as the country prepares to inaugurate its first new president in eight years, with Western sanctions cutting ever deeper into the Islamic republic’s financial lifelines and increasing pressure for a nuclear deal with the West. A welter of new data shows accelerated financial hemorrhaging across multiple sectors, from plummeting hard-currency reserves to steadily falling oil exports, Iran’s main source of foreign cash. U.S. officials and analysts say the tide of bad news will complicate the task awaiting Hassan Rouhani, the incoming president, but it could also increase Iran’s willingness to accept limits that would preclude it from developing nuclear weapons.Although many Iran experts think that the chances for a bargain remain small, recent warnings about the economy from within the regime suggest that the nation’s leaders may be looking for a way out, analysts say.
http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-08-02...
Justaminute wrote:
<quoted text>And so is the rest of the world.

The rest of the world is not doing any better than the USA and if so... WHO?
Justaminute wrote:
<quoted text>From China

Yeah right, from a prosperous China to possible collapse if they're not careful...
After many years of euphoria over China's rapid growth and the country's apparently inevitable rise to global economic dominance, the China story has taken a serious turn for the worse. China, it now seems, is about to collapse, and along the way it may well bring the world economy down with it.

So what happens next -- will China collapse? Probably not. A financial collapse is effectively a kind of bank run, and as long as government credibility remains high, banks are guaranteed and capital controls are maintained, it is unlikely that China will experience anything like a bank run. What is far more likely is that in the coming years, China's gross domestic product growth rate will continue to decline as the country focuses on stimulating consumption.
http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/29/opinion/pettis-...
Packing Heat

Vinita, OK

#46855 Aug 29, 2013
Justaminute wrote:
<quoted text>In my husband's hometown of Shiraz, they have been building malls like crazy and new business. Every one has one. The newest mall is like the Mall of America, almost 900 stores with amusement rides and 2 levels just for restaurants.

And just exactly when did this hell hole in the sand turn around? Northside Tulsa would be safer for a white prostitute in a mini-skirt walking the streets at mid-night than this dump at any hour of the day!

Economic Decline in Shiraz...
February 1, 2012

Even before the effects of the latest sanctions can be seen within Iran, many of the country’s cities are facing economic challenges. The city of Shiraz, the 6th most populated city of more than 1.2 million, is located in southern Iran, and is an example of a once thriving area facing soceo-economic decline. The city in the past had drawn in tourists due to its cultural attractions: poetry and literature, wine, and the city’s notoriously warm weather.

Now, due to inflation rates at 23%, and unemployment rates at 15 %, some within the city are choosing to move elsewhere. One man, described in the article about the city in The Economist, is thinking about returning to Afghanistan after 20 years in Iran if business gets any worse. Droughts and a growing population rate have also aggravated the issue. Many within the city are upset with the Iranian regime for their worsening state, especially after the protests with the 2009 presidential elections. Tourism is also down after the British embassy in Tehran was stormed and looted last November. When talking about human security, we discussed poverty and how higher poverty rates within areas can lead to higher crime rates and violence. The article mentions that the crime rate in Shiraz has risen also. One Shirazi points out how three years ago it was safer to walk the streets of the city, whereas now one would have to be much more weary.

News about Iran recently doesn’t necessarily discuss Iran’s domestic matters, but has been more about their nuclear program and threats about interfering in the Strait of Hormuz. However, with more sanctions recently being implemented, the economic and social conditions within cities in Iran such as Shiraz will continue to worsen. The current regime has shown less concern for the human security issues within the country, focusing more on traditional security practices such as building nuclear capabilities, which also fits the argument that states advocate traditional security measures more so than human security. The Iranian regime has become more repressive also since the 2009 elections, but as people who are facing the challenges of a weakening economy grow angrier about their government policy, another protest may possibly be witnessed in the future.
http://securityandconflict.umwblogs.org/2012/...

But that's not all, this place is in the area too!
May 14, 2013
NCRI - In continuation of factory and production units closure in Iran, about 500 workers of one of three safety belt production factories were laid off. Member of the Iranian regime’s parliament from the region said,“Akhshan factory is the last case in continuing closure of factories in Fars province.” Ahmad Reza Naghibzadeh said:“The closure of Akhshan factory as one of three safety belt production factories in the country with 500 employees is indicative of crisis in the province.”
Packing Heat

Vinita, OK

#46856 Aug 29, 2013
Justaminute wrote:
<quoted text>The same things are happening through out the Far East in places like Thailand and Indonesia.

Wrong again!
Thai to Indonesia Stocks Fall the Most Since 2001
August 28, 2013

Stocks in Southeast Asia are tumbling at the fastest pace in 12 years relative to global equities, sending the regional benchmark index into a bear market as foreign investors cut holdings for a third month.

The MSCI Southeast Asia Index has dropped 11 percent this month and is down 21 percent from this year’s peak on May 8. The gauge’s August retreat is 9.1 percentage points bigger than that of the MSCI All-Country World Index, the widest gap since April 2001. The Asian measure is valued at 1.8 times net assets, falling below the global index’s multiple of 1.9 for the first time since at least 2009, data compiled by Bloomberg show.

Foreign investors have sold a net $2.2 billion of Thai, Indonesian and Philippine shares this month amid signs of slowing regional economic growth and speculation that the U.S. Federal Reserve will soon cut stimulus. While the retreat has spurred state pension funds in Indonesia and Thailand to boost stock holdings, Bank Julius Baer & Co. and Societe Generale SA say it’s too early to buy. The MSCI Southeast Asia gauge has posted average losses of 44 percent in bear markets since 1995.
http://www.businessweek.com/news/2013-08-28/t...
Justaminute wrote:
<quoted text>You know the saying "You snooze, you lose."
We have been snoozing to long.
You don't save your way to prosperity.

Yep. and so far you have lost everyone... try again!
Justaminute wrote:
<quoted text>Nor do you get prospers buy sinking all your money in your military.

Nor does the United States put all of our money in the military!
It has been shrinking and continues to shrink but don't let facts get in the way of your lies... I'm sure you were just bloviating to make some kind of meaningless liberal point.
Packing Heat

Vinita, OK

#46857 Aug 29, 2013
Justaminute wrote:
<quoted text>
When every one has a college education, we are still going to need a garbage man but he'll make some damn good money.

OMG! This one really should get the laughs and no less a dumbass liberal idea...
Garbage Man College? Are you out of you rabbitass mind? You ignorant dolt, we plucked garbage men from the trees of africa and shaved them down, stood'em up on the hind legs and taught them how to hang on the back of the trash truck... all without going to College. Now we refer to them as North American Pavement Ape's (NAPA).

What the hell is College going to do to help them be better gabage haulers. And more pay = higher garbage bills as well as taxpayer supported college loans, you friggen idiot!
DoesntMatter

Perkins, OK

#46860 Aug 29, 2013
[QUOTE

Justaminute wrote, "<quoted text>From China

Yeah right, from a prosperous China to possible collapse if they're not careful...

So what happens next -- will China collapse? Probably not. A financial collapse is effectively a kind of bank run, and as long as government credibility remains high, banks are guaranteed and capital controls are maintained, it is unlikely that China will experience anything like a bank run. What is far more likely is that in the coming years, China's gross domestic product growth rate will continue to decline as the country focuses on stimulating consumption.
http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/29/opinion/pettis-... [/QUOTE]

Chinas using government money to build huge ghost towns. It's a waste. We are not a communiat country. Government has no business building malls.

As growth slows, China's huge investment in infrastructure is looking ever harder to sustain, leaving a string of ambitious projects - towns, shopping malls and even a theme park - empty and forlorn.

"We have spoken a lot about these ghost towns in Ireland and Spain recently [but China] is Ireland and Spain on steroids," says Kevin Doran, a senior investment fund manager at Brown Shipley in the UK.

Investment in infrastructure accounts for much of China's GDP - the country is said to have built the equivalent of Rome every two months in the past decade. And with such a large pool of labour, it is harder to put the brakes on when growth slows and supply outstrips demand.

"You have got seven to eight million people entering the workforce in China every single year, so you have to give them something to do in order to retain the legitimacy of the government," says Doran.

"Maybe 10 or 15 years ago they were doing things that made sense - roads, rail, power stations etc - but they have now got to the point where it's investment for investment's sake."

So which are the most striking of these white elephants?

New city of Chenggong, Yunnan

"In Chenggong, there are more than 100,000 new apartments with no occupants," according to the World Bank's Holly Krambeck.

Designed as an overspill point for nearby Kunming, a city of nearly six-and-a-half million, Chenggong began to take shape in 2003.

High-rise apartment blocks have mushroomed but today it is still largely deserted after failed attempts by the authorities to attract new residents.

Matteo Damiani, an Italian journalist who worked for seven years in Kunming, has visited Chenggong several times, photographing empty tower blocks that loom over gigantic plazas, peopled only by enormous works of art.

He found a small community of students, workers and security guards but nobody else.

"The suburbs and even the city centre are empty," he says. "You can find a big stadium, shopping malls and hundreds of buildings finished but abandoned."

There is even an area for luxury villas that is totally abandoned, he adds.

It is said to be one of the biggest ghost cities in Asia.

New South China Mall, Dongguang, Guangdong

The distinction of being the world's biggest ghost mall, or emptiest shopping centre, may belong to this vast complex on the outskirts of Dongguang, a city of 10 million.

You may think the mall would be booming, with a population of that size, but the vast majority of its 1,500 stores have been empty since it was finished in 2005.

It has been hurt by poor transport infrastructure. As one blogger puts it, "unfortunately it was built in the middle of nowhere.

It is not as though the developers did not try. They threw in a canal, windmills and replicas of the Campanile from St Mark's Square in Venice and the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. The mall's website says it is "bound to be a miracle of commercial history".
So What

Mcloud, OK

#46861 Aug 29, 2013
WaqForOil wrote:
<quoted text>
So true, some muscle got money.
Are you one of those rich athletes
with sports related brain damage ?
Some of us do have good ideas, and
become rich. Moi.
Hey Waq, We are getting really tired of WarForOil's same ole, same ole Hack Show. It is like watching a Friends marathon. So we would appreciate it, if you would take your Hack Tribute Show on down the road.
So What

Mcloud, OK

#46862 Aug 29, 2013
Packing Heat wrote:
<quoted text>
Since you have babbled out a bunch of nonsense, I'll address each on its own posting in hopes of showing you that your liberal bullshit has more holes than Swiss Cheese!
Really? Who and What Idea's are they stealing?
What makes our situation even more remarkable is that, unlike some other countries, the U.S. has many, many small businesses where the only "employee" is also the owner. Freelancers, consultants, one-man-band landscapers, and the like often incorporate for liability and tax purposes.
There are some studies of global entrepreneurship where the U.S. leads the pack. When the World Bank tallied up the average number of newly registered limited liability companies across the globe between 2005 and 2009, it found we had one of the highest startup rates per 1,000 people, in a league with Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom.
The U.S. also finished tops for entrepreneurial activity among advanced countries in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor's 2011 annual report, which makes estimates about start-up businesses formation across the world based on a 140,000 person survey. By their account, about 12 percent of U.S. adults run businesses that are less than three and a half years old, compared to 6.9 percent on average in other so-called "innovation-driven" economies. One reason this study might find such different results from the OECD is that the survey counts any kind of business, whether or not it pays employees, as entrepreneurial activity. That's a big deal in the United States, where about three quarters of all firms have zero payroll. Those businesses often belong to self-employed individuals who haven't needed to incorporate.
Some of the most cutting-edge young companies in the world call Silicon Valley, New York, Boston, and Austin, Texas home, partly because we have the financial backers to support them. According to the OECD, the U.S. ranks second overall in venture capital invested as a percentage of GDP, which wedges us between Israel at No. 1 and Sweden at No. 3. In sheer dollars, we dwarf everyone.
One-man-band Landscapers? Only in America can an illegal become a true entrepreneur. I wonder if their music is limited to mariachi?

They still need to pay their taxes to be considered a real business, most landscapers are cash under the table criminals.
So What

Mcloud, OK

#46863 Aug 29, 2013
Packing Heat wrote:
<quoted text>
Wrong again!
Thai to Indonesia Stocks Fall the Most Since 2001
August 28, 2013
Stocks in Southeast Asia are tumbling at the fastest pace in 12 years relative to global equities, sending the regional benchmark index into a bear market as foreign investors cut holdings for a third month.
The MSCI Southeast Asia Index has dropped 11 percent this month and is down 21 percent from this year’s peak on May 8. The gauge’s August retreat is 9.1 percentage points bigger than that of the MSCI All-Country World Index, the widest gap since April 2001. The Asian measure is valued at 1.8 times net assets, falling below the global index’s multiple of 1.9 for the first time since at least 2009, data compiled by Bloomberg show.
Foreign investors have sold a net $2.2 billion of Thai, Indonesian and Philippine shares this month amid signs of slowing regional economic growth and speculation that the U.S. Federal Reserve will soon cut stimulus. While the retreat has spurred state pension funds in Indonesia and Thailand to boost stock holdings, Bank Julius Baer & Co. and Societe Generale SA say it’s too early to buy. The MSCI Southeast Asia gauge has posted average losses of 44 percent in bear markets since 1995.
http://www.businessweek.com/news/2013-08-28/t...
<quoted text>
Yep. and so far you have lost everyone... try again!
<quoted text>
Nor does the United States put all of our money in the military!
It has been shrinking and continues to shrink but don't let facts get in the way of your lies... I'm sure you were just bloviating to make some kind of meaningless liberal point.
LOL! So now you want to pretend your a market analyst. Well pull up a five year chart on JCI:IND and tell me what your looking at. I'll make it easy for you.

http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/JCI:IND/chart Just click on 5Y above the chart.
So What

Mcloud, OK

#46864 Aug 29, 2013
I've noticed I now have a Judge It! stalker. At least I have given you a purpose for your pathetic life. Have fun. You need more practice, you've missed a few. LOL!
So What

Mcloud, OK

#46865 Aug 29, 2013
TAMARA wrote:
History
Originally named Oklahoma Christian University, the school was founded by Dr. Ely Vaughn Zollars on October 9, 1906. Enid-area businessmen raised $150,000 and purchased a 40-acre (160,000 m2)Template:Convert/track/adj/ on campus east of Enid. Though ultimately the university would base its teachings on the Disciples of Christ denomination, the committee to bring a university to Enid had a more diverse religious background: Edmund Frantz (Presbyterian), Frank Hamilton (United Brethren, Disciple), Al Loewen (Jewish), J.M. Pieratt (Disciple), and Everett Purcell (Presbyterian).[1] Funding for the operation of the University was supplied by T. W. Phillips of Butler, Pennsylvania and the Disciples of Christ Churches of Oklahoma.
Oklahoma Christian University held its first classes September 17, 1907.[2] The first year's enrollment was 256 students, and of the freshman class, only 20 had completed high school.[4] Phillips High School was created in 1907 as a preparatory school at the same time to prepare students for college-level courses, and continued operations until 1925.[5] The school became affiliated with the North Central Association of Colleges on March 23, 1919, and in the American Association of Colleges in 1920.[5]
Phillips University also ran a graduate business school which awarded MBA degrees, and was very well recognized in the states of Oklahoma and Texas. It also had a large international community of students from more than 20 countries.
Athletics
The school's sports teams were called the Haymakers. For one year, 1920, the school was a member of the Southwest Athletic Conference. Between 1917 and 1920, John Maulbetsch was the head football coach at Phillips University.[6] Maulbetsch was an All-American running back at the University of Michigan in 1914, where he earned the nickname the "Human Bullet". With his name recognition, he was able to recruit big-name talent to Phillips, including future Pro Football Hall of Famer Steve Owen, and future United States Olympic Committee President Doug Roby. Maulbetsch quickly turned Phillips into a major contender in the southwest, as his teams beat Oklahoma and Texas and lost only one game in the 1918 and 1919 seasons. The 1919 team, known as "Mauley's Iron Men", was considered by many experts to be the finest football squad in the southwest that season.[7]
After defeating the Oklahoma and Texas football teams, the "Haymakers" gained a reputation as “one of the strongest teams in the southwest.”[8][9] When Phillips defeated Texas 10-0 in Austin, Texas in October 1919, the Longhorns had not lost a game since 1917.[10] One Texas newspaper reported that Phillips had "whitewashed the Longhorns in their own corral."[11]
As a result of Phillips' success, it was admitted to the Southwest Conference for the 1920 season. However, with the loss of several key players from the previous squads, Phillips fell to 4-5-1 record, failed to score a single point in conference play and immediately dropped out of the conference. Maulbetsch was hired to coach Oklahoma A&M in 1921. Unable to sustain its previous success, the program's reputation faded; the school finally closed the program in 1933.[7]
Subsequently, Phillips University baseball and basketball teams were in the NAIA. From 1952 through 1981, Phillips University baseball teams dominated their division. Coached by Dr. Joe Record during this period, the Haymakers compiled a 648-294 record for a .688 winning percentage.[12] Three of Record's teams went to the NAIA World Series. He was the NAIA Coach of the Year in 1973, and inducted into the NAIA Hall of Fame in 1975.
WEB: Phillips.edu
Masco: Haymakers
Nickname PU
For more info look it up So What!
You having fun yet?
Thanks for the history lesson. I was wondering how Lil Hay got his name. Here's a little history back at you. http://enidnews.com/localnews/x598327311/Loca...
So What

Mcloud, OK

#46866 Aug 29, 2013
Thanks for the history lesson Sharon. I was wondering how Lil Hay got his name.

Here's some more history about him so everyone else will know what we are talking about.
http://enidnews.com/localnews/x598327311/Loca...

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