Say "NO" to Boosterthon Fun Runs in o...
Alpharetta Papa

Gainesville, GA

#26 Feb 5, 2009
First of all, I dislike any sort of school-related fundraising effort that involves our kids. I don't care if it's overpriced soda, gift wrap, cookies, or running laps.

Our children should not be PIMPED out to raise money for a supposedly underfunded school system. Period.

If your kids go to public school and the school doesn't get enough money, put all your time and energy into getting more funding. Instead of dragging your kids around and guilting the neighbors into giving money to something the likely don't care about, why not load up a busload of parents and kids and go to the government and lobby for more cash? You think the press wouldn't eat that up?

My son goes to a private school, and I can't believe how this place takes every opportunity to get into not only my pocket, but also now my friends' and neighbors', too.

Why are my friends and neighbors supposed to subsidize a PRIVATE school with this good Boosterthon/FunRun? It's not like we're raising money for cancer, we're raising money to help finance a "poor" private school that, despite its $10,000/year tuition bill, can't pay its own way.

It's not exactly the sort of thing that gets a lot of sympathy.

Not to mention, my 5-year-old doesn't need the added pressure of having to raise money. We're new to the area, we work at home, and we don't have a huge network of friends to bother with this garbage. But there's always some hot-shot a-hole who gets everyone in his office to sponsor his spoiled kid, and now THAT kid is a hero who gets the stupid scooter or an iPod or whatever.

The whole thing is just so dumb.
Stephanie

United States

#27 Feb 10, 2009
I deplore this fundraiser and have enjoyed reading the comments. My son came home last year all pumped up wanting to call every out of state relative, and every grandparent, uncle, etc. to ask for money. I was appalled and refused to allow him to do it, explaining that this was not good manners. Many of his relatives are on fixed incomes and now this year with the economy many are simply just struggling to get by. I feel that it is bad parenting on my part to allow my child to beg for money from relatives/friends who simply can't afford to but probably would anyway because it was my child that asked. I am calling my school this morning to find out what options I have to opt out without singling out my child unfairly. Has anyone had any experience with this?
Involved

Monroe, NC

#28 Feb 14, 2009
I am a teacher in a school that is currently doing the "Fun Run". Yes, it takes classroom time, and most time more than 5 min.- closer to 20 or 30 min. We have to make sure that they are done in all the classrooms before we can change for our math or reading classes.(If we didn't change classes, it would be okay and closer to 5 min.)

It is a great fundraiser, but it does take a lot of work. In theory, we could do it ourselves, but noone will take the time or energy to organize it.

We were able to raise $30,000 for our school last year and that was great. Something most people don't know- the teachers get 10% of the pledges brought in to their classroom. That was a plus as I got money to spend on my kids. There isn't money in school budgets anymore, as most are actually being cut. With this fundraiser we don't have to worry about handing out anything, there is no product involved- and they aren't usually worth buying anyway.

I can go either way on this fund raiser, but I would also say there are more pros than cons!!!
River Veteran

Cumming, GA

#29 Feb 17, 2009
My daughter ran 20 laps and on her paper it said "about 30".....everyone that my daughter got to pledge....pledged about $1 per lap. They lied and tried to get the pledges to pay $10 MORE. My daughter knew it was a lie and brought it to my attention and said...."but dad...I only ran 20 laps and they want me to tell, Uncle Dave, Aunt Chris, Grandmother, etc....that I ran 30...I shouldn't lie should I"

Since: Feb 09

Woodstock, GA

#30 Feb 17, 2009
River Veteran wrote:
My daughter ran 20 laps and on her paper it said "about 30".....everyone that my daughter got to pledge....pledged about $1 per lap. They lied and tried to get the pledges to pay $10 MORE. My daughter knew it was a lie and brought it to my attention and said...."but dad...I only ran 20 laps and they want me to tell, Uncle Dave, Aunt Chris, Grandmother, etc....that I ran 30...I shouldn't lie should I"
Public schools are government ran conditioning camps.
Not a fan

Germantown, TN

#31 Mar 7, 2009
1. I am for school vouchers.
2. I have spent 6 years involved in school fundraisers at a private school.
3. We are in the middle of a "fun-run" now.
4. Our kids are under intense pressure to get pledges and many are in tears each day.
5. I love the idea of a fun-run for the physical "health and exercise" side of it...but our own PTA organization could run this and make more money.
6. We did just that in the past with a "Read-a-thon" and raised over $50,000. Only a small portion went to expenses. The rest...pure profit..and no company to split it with. And guess what...it encouraged our kids to READ!
In the know

Clearwater, FL

#32 Mar 9, 2009
It is a fact that Boosterthon reaps very little profit. Every child in the school receives a free shirt on the day of the run, regardless of whether they raised money. The spirit in the schools during the 5-7 school days the men are there, is priceless. And, the 10 people we "connect" with to ask for donations, they love the fact that their loved one (the child) will participate in a run where a goal is set. A child running 35 laps (equal to just over 2 miles) is a beautiful sight, and one the childrne are so proud of themselves for. Boosterthin places their funds back into a summer mission trip. If you have not met these young men, find a school who is hosting the Fun Run, and go meet them and observe what they are doing. If you believe your PTA or a group of school volunteers could mimic this run, good luck. It would take months and months of solid prep time, countless volunteers, a near endless supply of card-stock, printing non-stop, 500+ shirts, etc., etc.
lacrossemom

Birmingham, AL

#33 Mar 31, 2009
Our school recently did our LAST fun run with Boosterthon. They asked us to give them a $2000 booking fee to sign them for next year. I expressed concern about that and told them that I wanted to wait to see how we did this year before I resigned. Funny - as soon as they heard those words from me, our customer service level dropped big time! This is no way to run a business. They didn't give me any incentive to resign with them. I will go with Fund Runners next year if we do another run. So beware, the cheering stops when things stop going their way.
lacrossemom

Birmingham, AL

#34 Mar 31, 2009
Here's a little clarification on that 10% the teachers get. That check is written out of your PTO checkbook - not Boosterthon's. Isn't 100% of the money you get to keep going to your child's school? Boosterthon just dictates how you spend that first check. They are not really being underhanded, but they are bending the truth a bit.
Dad in Roswell

Roswell, GA

#35 Apr 1, 2009
Boosterthon takes up classrom time and pressures our children to raise funds. A lot of pressure. It is not optional if they happen to be at school during the fundraising period. Just by attending class, they are pressured to take part. This should not be allowed in the classrooms at all. Perhaps I would find it acceptable if it took place outside of classrooom time. The 5 minutes a day the above posts refer to does not include the full day of the event itself, when after the event my daughter was sent back to her classroom to watch network television untill they were dismissed. I am angered by the pressure and the way classroom time was spent. I may be in the minority but I think $35.00 IS a lot to ask of friends neighbors and relitives.

As far as the administrative costs go, Don't kid yourselves. The people who work for the organization are making money. Not the kids they hire to run it, but the administrators. In non profit organizations, the people who work there make money, often a lot of money. If what they take in goes to the salaries, it can't be called profit now can it.

My daughter cried because she didn't make the monitary goal set for her class, and was proud of the number of laps she ran. Make of that what you will.
Julie

Jonesboro, GA

#36 Apr 3, 2009
My kids cried too...every night. What brainwashing! Is that character building? I hated the pressure for my kids to "beg" for money. Total classroom disruption. Boosterthon takes 50% of the money the kids earn. If there was full disclosure, parents would complain more. How difficult is it to adminster kids running around the track? Schools justifying the outsourcing of this, are just lazy. Now that sends a powerful statement to your kids!!! We're just too lazy to do this internally... let's call a 3rd party and they can keep half!!!
Julie

Jonesboro, GA

#37 Apr 3, 2009
You must work for Boosterthon.... you are really "in the know". And really... it wouldn't be that difficult to pull it off. Just need a track and some fun prizes AND we'd get to keep 100% of the money!!!
In the know wrote:
It is a fact that Boosterthon reaps very little profit. Every child in the school receives a free shirt on the day of the run, regardless of whether they raised money. The spirit in the schools during the 5-7 school days the men are there, is priceless. And, the 10 people we "connect" with to ask for donations, they love the fact that their loved one (the child) will participate in a run where a goal is set. A child running 35 laps (equal to just over 2 miles) is a beautiful sight, and one the childrne are so proud of themselves for. Boosterthin places their funds back into a summer mission trip. If you have not met these young men, find a school who is hosting the Fun Run, and go meet them and observe what they are doing. If you believe your PTA or a group of school volunteers could mimic this run, good luck. It would take months and months of solid prep time, countless volunteers, a near endless supply of card-stock, printing non-stop, 500+ shirts, etc., etc.
Defender

Destin, FL

#38 Apr 8, 2009
We've got parents and teachers and administrators who all apparently failed the math concept here talking about how great an idea this is... let's see it we go around the neighborhood and ask for cash for the school then we invite some company to come in and they gather all our kids together and have them run around a tiny circle over and over all while making themselves 'feel good'... are we nuts..? The price we pay for this is after we beg our friends and neighbors and relatives for cash is that we give 1/2 of it away to this company that will then leave the state! We've got to teach our kids that this is a very poor idea. As parents, we should all be teaching them better than this.
Aparently it's OK to get mugged as long as you 'feel good' about it? This is crazy. If the school or your kids teacher needs cash or supplies, help them directly. But, by all means do not have a boosterthon 'fun run'.
This is thievery plain and simple.
Mom in NC

Burlington, NC

#39 Apr 10, 2009
I agree 100%. This is child manipulation in the worst degree. It shows laziness on the part of the school for not running the program themselves and it is deceptive because the donee (poor childs grandma) is never told that only 52% is actually going to support the school. You would see a tremendous drop in contributions if the donee was actually presented with the truth.
Student in Atlanta

Atlanta, GA

#40 Apr 14, 2009
Well, I haven't seen any posts from students yet, so this might be interesting. I'm an 8th grader at a private school in Atlanta and we've just started our second "Fun" run. It's anything but fun! First of all, nobody in the middle school wants to make pledges (except for the popular seventh graders who fake enthusiasm for laughs), and the men who come in are always trying to cover up their talking down to us with too much enthusiasm. I can't say I know what it's like for the young kids in K-5, but I can tell you that if we'd had it when I was in those ages I'd cry if my parents said no to ripping off Uncle Bob, because I wouldn't get my glow-in-the-dark frisbee. But in middle school, they just bribe us with iPods and cheap foam rockets. You need to make 15 pledges -15!- to get a little Boosterthon rocket. I expect that they think we're too dumb to see through it, and the sad thing is that some kids my age are. Understand that most of my grade is on financial aid, and my family is really struggling right now. Also, it really throws off our day when those over-caffienated guys show up.

At the 5th-8th grade "Pep Rally" they had today, it was a trainwreck. They were way too hyper and kept trying to pump us up. From doing this twice, I can definitely see where these parents are coming from when they talk about the pressure put on their kids! But, my class wasn't saying much and we were actually being pretty calm. Then, in social studies, our teacher kept saying that we thought we were 'too cool' for Boosterthon when, in actuality, we "[hadn't] accomplished anything in life except for getting into private high school." (In case this doesn't make sense, most of my grade got accepted to the main private high school in the area). That's how most of the teachers think on the Boosterthon. It's a very twisted way to run things. I don't think I'm 'too cool' for anything; I just know that my overall family isn't doing well and that those people are trying to take a much bigger piece of the pie than they should.

The unfortunate part is that as a student body, we can't change a thing. Our school is money-hungry and we just have to live with it and push through the next week. But that's just my opinion on all of this, as a 14-year-old student.
Scammed 4th Grader

Fayetteville, GA

#41 Apr 22, 2009
Boosterthon reps did not tell me a flat donation could be pledged, so everyone I called donated laps for me because they LOVE me. Boosterthon made me think I would be running a large track. The track was so short I laughed when I saw it. I ran around 41 times and thought I was so strong and in shape. Even the weakest students ran as many laps as I did. It was very scary to have to tell my favorite relative that he owed $175.00 for my 35 laps. I have cried alot of tears and was so mad at those boosterthon people and learned a lesson and will never let another adult take advantage of me again. If I had a computer at my house I could have gone on the boosterthon website and seen the truth and told my family members to just give a flat donation. I even feel scammed by my teacher that I thought liked me. Boosterthon people really suck!!!
ryno69

Memphis, TN

#42 Apr 23, 2009
Sally Foster, Innisbrook and other companies that sell wrapping paper, cookie dough, etc. take 50-52% of the proceeds from their fundraising sales. You the parents, PTA, Foundation, etc. handle passing out all of the materials, remind everyone to sell, sell, sell, record and collect all of the orders and payments and then turn them into Sally Foster to be filled. Then you are responsible for distributing all of the items purchased. We just did a Boosterthon Funrun. The only things we had to do was help pass out t-shirts to the students, pass out water during the run and cheer the kids as they ran and count the money from the pledges that was collected. Boosterthon supplied and handled out all of the materials, went to the classrooms each day to get the kids excited about the Boosterthon theme to "Dream Big".(Each letter stands for a word like Diligence, Responsibility, Enthusiasm, etc. I can't remember them all but my 1st grade daughter can and she still reminds her brother about being them.) They recorded all of the pledges, and ran the Funrun with music props, etc. It was the easiest fundraiser I ever did. Yes they get 48% but they do 90% of the work. And the kids get to have an afternoon of fun running around a track to some fun music.
ryno69

Memphis, TN

#43 Apr 23, 2009
It says clearly and many times on the pledge book and DVD that the track is only 1/16 of a mile. It clearly states in the pledge book and in the DVD every student gets at the beginning that they will cap the run at 35 laps. The t-shirts that every student gets when they run only has marking for 35 laps to be recorded. When you fill out the pledge there is a space for the donors name in the center then to the left you can check off boxes to denote how much they are pledgign per lap or to the right of their name you can mark off that they are making a flat donation and how much thay flat donatin will be. It says clearly on the pledge card and clearly in the DVD that flat donations are gladly excepted. It sounds like you need to read and follow directions a little better.
ryno69

Memphis, TN

#44 Apr 23, 2009
Private schools typically have smarter students (higher test scores at least) and they operate on half or less of the money as their public counterparts.

They only have high test scores becuase they only admit students that can pass their entrance exams.
ryno69

Memphis, TN

#45 Apr 23, 2009
Sally Foster is an optional fundraiser. Some would argue that our children are held hostage to a program like Boosterthon where they have access to our children in the classroom on a daily basis during the fundraising drive.

Boosterthon is an optional fundraiser. Every child whether they get donations or not does recevie a t-shirt and participates in the run. 80% of our school population brought in pledges but 100% of the students ran and got a t-shirt.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Alpharetta Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Dueling groups to rally at Confederate landmark 3 hr LarryV 2,004
Review: iLoveKickboxing - Alpharetta, GA Jun 19 Kaykay5985 11
News Law Student Charged With Murder (Mar '08) Jun 11 Perplexed 142
News Third Suspect in Roswell Store Owner Murder Wan... (Jul '08) Jun 8 Group 4
News Shane Co. jewelry store files for bankruptcy (Jan '09) May 26 Atlantakid 17
whose kid did the Alpharetta mom allegedly screw? May '16 jimbo 1
Terry Wellham In Jail Again ? (Dec '14) May '16 just waiting 3
More from around the web

Personal Finance

Alpharetta Mortgages