U.S. rattled as Mexico drug war bleed...
Ret-AF

Alamogordo, NM

#127 Mar 21, 2009
Corrected:

This is indeed a tough issue, one that requires a truthful, intelligent, and dedicated course of action.

There are many different facets to the drug problem not the least of which are money laundering, gun running, prostitution, slavery, and use as a disease.

Until these issues are understood and addressed in their entirety 'it' the 1000 pound gorilla of drug use, standing in our midst will not readily go away.

We can calmly and intellectually discuss the pros and cons of the 'drug war' and or the 'legalization of drugs' but it is obvious that neither is truly an issue to which we have adequately provisioned support, money, thought, and viable resources.

Consequently, some of our citizens will continue to suffer as a result of our inability to do what is right on so many different levels. I personally experienced from a law enforcement perspective the East Coast -vs- West Coast drug wars of the late 80's and 90's and I understand how violent it can really be...but yet we refuse to learn.

“+Brutally Inquizitive+”

Since: Aug 08

Location hidden

#128 Mar 21, 2009
Ret-AF wrote:
Corrected:
This is indeed a tough issue, one that requires a truthful, intelligent, and dedicated course of action.
There are many different facets to the drug problem not the least of which are money laundering, gun running, prostitution, slavery, and use as a disease.
Until these issues are understood and addressed in their entirety 'it' the 1000 pound gorilla of drug use, standing in our midst will not readily go away.
We can calmly and intellectually discuss the pros and cons of the 'drug war' and or the 'legalization of drugs' but it is obvious that neither is truly an issue to which we have adequately provisioned support, money, thought, and viable resources.
Consequently, some of our citizens will continue to suffer as a result of our inability to do what is right on so many different levels. I personally experienced from a law enforcement perspective the East Coast -vs- West Coast drug wars of the late 80's and 90's and I understand how violent it can really be...but yet we refuse to learn.
Very good post. Thanks for your opinion. I also think many unfortunate people will continue to suffer, because no one has a real plan for any of this as of yet.
Janet White

United States

#129 Mar 22, 2009
Oh great, just what we need, in so many ways....

Julie Myers Wood: Federal agency turf feuds impede transnational drug violence efforts

http://www.elpasotimes.com/juarez/ci_11967683
talker

Albuquerque, NM

#130 Mar 22, 2009
Is everyone ready for druglords to live in USA

“+Brutally Inquizitive+”

Since: Aug 08

Location hidden

#131 Mar 22, 2009
talker wrote:
Is everyone ready for druglords to live in USA
They already do.

“+Brutally Inquizitive+”

Since: Aug 08

Location hidden

#132 Mar 22, 2009
http://www.elpasotimes.com/ci_11974421

"Girl, 14, found slain under bed is identified
Daniel Borunda / El Paso Times Staff
Posted: 03/23/2009 12:00:00 AM MDT

The body of a girl found under a bed inside a Juárez home earlier this month has been identified, the Chihuahua state attorney general's office said recently.

DNA tests identified the body of that of 14-year-old Alejandra Rodriguez Macias, who was a victim of a homicide. The cause of death was not released.

On March 10, the girl was found wrapped in a blanket under a bed in the 1200 block of Valparaiso in the Parajes del Sur area. Investigators said that she had been dead for about six days."

“+Brutally Inquizitive+”

Since: Aug 08

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#133 Mar 23, 2009
http://www.elpasotimes.com/news/ci_11973570
Latest secret grave 1 of many around Juárez, bodies show signs of torture

“+Brutally Inquizitive+”

Since: Aug 08

Location hidden

#134 Mar 23, 2009
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/23/us/23border...
Drug Cartel Violence Spills Into U.S. From Mexico
(3 page article)

“+Brutally Inquizitive+”

Since: Aug 08

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#135 Mar 23, 2009
bumping up

“+Brutally Inquizitive+”

Since: Aug 08

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#136 Mar 23, 2009
http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory...

Obama Wants to Shift Money, Resources to SW Border

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Since: Aug 08

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#137 Mar 23, 2009
As Mexico goes, so goes the US
Congress and Obama finally wake up to Calderón's bold war on drug cartels.

http://www.csmonitor.com/2009/0324/p08s01-com...

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#138 Mar 23, 2009
http://abcnews.go.com/International/WireStory...
Mexico's Most Wanted Traffickers, at $2 Million
Mexico offers $2 million reward for capture of most wanted leaders of 6 cartels
By The Associated Press
March 23, 2009 (AP)
The Associated Press
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Mexico's Attorney General's Office on Monday published this list of most-wanted drug trafficking suspects and their top lieutenants, and offered rewards of up to $2.1 million for information leading to their capture.

Rewards of $30 million pesos ($2.1 million) were offered for information leading to the arrest of:

— The Gulf-Zetas Cartel:

Heriberto Lazcano Lazcano

Jorge Eduardo Costilla Sanchez

Ezequiel Cardenas Guillen, alias "Tony Tormenta"

Miguel Angel Trevino Morales

Omar Trevino Morales

Ivan Velazquez Caballero, alias "El Taliban"

Gregorio Sauceda Gamboa

— Pacific Cartel:

Joaquin Guzman Loera or Joaquin Archivaldo Guzman Loera, alias "El Chapo"

Ismael Zambada Garcia, alias "El Mayo"

Ignacio Coronel Villarreal

Juan Jose Esparragoza Moreno, alias "El Azul"

Vicente Zambada Niebla, alias "El Vicentillo" (captured)

— Beltran Leyva Cartel:

Arturo Beltran Leyva

Mario Alberto Beltran Leyva and/or Hector Beltran Leyva, alias "El General"

Sergio Villarreal Barragan

Edgar Valdez Villareal, alias "La Barbie"

— Carrillo Fuentes Cartel:

Vicente Carrillo Fuentes, alias "El Viceroy"

Vicente Carrillo Leyva

— "La Familia" Cartel:

Nazario Moreno Gonzalez

Servando Gomez Martinez

Jose de Jesus Mendez Vargas, alias "El Chango"

Dionicio Loya Plancarte

— Arellano Felix Cartel:

Teodoro Garcia Simental, alias "El Teo"

Fernando Sanchez Arellano, alias "El Ingeniero"

Rewards of 15 million pesos ($1 million) were offered for each of these cartel lieutenants:

— The Gulf-Zetas Cartel:

Sigifredo Najera Talamantes (captured)

Ricardo Almanza Morales

Eduardo Almanza Morales

Raymundo Almanza Morales

Flavio Mendez Santiago

Sergio Pena Solis and/or Rene Solis Carlos
Raul Lucio Fernandez Lechuga, alias "El Lucky"

Sergio Enrique Ruiz Tlapanco

— Beltran Leyva Cartel:

Francisco Hernandez Garcia, alias "El 2000"

Alberto Pineda Villa

Marco Antonio Pineda Villa

Hector Huerta Rios

— Juarez and/or Carrillo Fuentes Cartel:

Juan Pablo Ledesma and/or Eduardo Ledesma
Nos3y

Alamogordo, NM

#139 Mar 26, 2009

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#140 Mar 26, 2009
LAS CRUCES — Doña Ana County is feeling the effects of a spike in drug cartel-related violence in Juárez, though obviously not on a similar scale, said a county law enforcement official Tuesday.
It has shown up through a surge in criminal activity, said County Undersheriff Chuck Franco.
"We're seeing an increase in our gang violence, home invasions, and an increase in the violence involving firearms," he said. "We're taking precautions in training our officers accordingly and equipping them accordingly so they can handle any situations like this."
Franco said the escalation began about six months ago.
U.S. President Barack Obama on Tuesday announced a number of measures to boost numbers of federal agents along the border in response to an outbreak of violence in Juárez and other Mexican cities.
Doña Ana County is attractive as a smuggling route, Franco said, because of access to two interstate highways, N.M. Hwy. 9 — which parallels the Mexico border — U.S. Hwy. 70 and N.M. Hwy. 26. Its undeveloped desert areas also serve as pathways, he said.
About 53 of the state's 180 miles of international border belong to Doña Ana County, while Luna, Grant and Hidalgo counties make up the remainder. New Mexico's border comprises about 9 percent of the entire U.S.-Mexico boundary, according to the International Boundary and Water Commission.
Amounts of narcotics seized by the U.S. Border Patrol's El Paso sector have dropped
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significantly in recent years —a trend the agency has attributed to increased enforcement, including more border agents, more technology and the construction of a border fence.
Human smuggling, which officials say is increasingly tied to cartel activity, also is on the decline.
But as drugs are harder to come by, skirmishes spike among gang members — both those connected directly to cartels and those whose ties are more indirect, Franco said.
"It becomes an issue of who has the drugs; usually it's the case of drug sales going sour," he said.
For example, Franco said, drug dealers may dilute their narcotics, prompting retaliation by the buyer. Or buyers may skip out on a payment, also leading to retaliation. In some cases, he said, gang members break into the homes of a known dealer to steal narcotics.
Doña Ana County has just one international port of entry, in Santa Teresa. Two other ports, in Columbus and Antelope Wells, also exist in New Mexico. None of the crossings leads directly into a large urban center, as is the case in El Paso. But Franco said that doesn't have much impact on smuggling, which often skirts ports of entry.
Franco said the much of the drug trafficking in Doña Ana County is tied to Juárez.
Neighboring Luna County in 2005 experienced a dramatic uptick in criminal activity connected with narcotics smuggling and human trafficking. It prompted Gov. Bill Richardson to call a state of emergency, which released some funding to local agencies for enforcement.
In addition, President George Bush in 2006 launched a program that placed the National Guard along the border to back up Border Patrol operations, until agent numbers could be increased.

“+Brutally Inquizitive+”

Since: Aug 08

Location hidden

#141 Mar 26, 2009
^^^^
http://www.lcsun-news.com/ci_11989504...

Luna County Sheriff Raymond Cobos said Tuesday the heightened enforcement efforts in that county succeeded.

"Criminal activity related to border crossings has dropped more than 85 percent over the last couple of years," he said.

But Cobos said his agency cooperates with Grant and Hidalgo counties, where trafficking activity has been on the rise.

Cobos said he hasn't seen a crime surge in Luna County tied to the Juarez cartel violence, but he believes Obama is on the right track with his announcement.

"I applaud Obama's administration for recognizing this is a serious problem," he said. "It's not going away, and anything we can do to reduce the carnage, especially in Juarez, is to be welcome. Whoever (federal agencies) send, they'll find us extremely cooperative."

Franco, too, said Obama's decision to increase the presence of federal agents is the right step, while militarization of the border would be a bad one.

"The only thing we'd ask is that New Mexico ... receive the funding necessary to increase manpower so that we can adequately protect the jurisdictions we're responsible for," he said. "We can sit here and say, "we can do this and that,' but if we don't have the manpower to do it, it's just not going to get done."

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Location hidden

#142 Mar 26, 2009
That 2nd link has a lot of raw statistics that I found very interesting. However, topix wouldn't allow me to post the numbers.I got this message:~Topix does not condone the posting of phone numbers, social security numbers, or other personal information into the forums.~
So......anyhooot, take a look for yourself if you're interested. It's pretty much in our back yard. Be safe everyone.
http://www.lcsun-news.com/ci_11989504...
FYI

Bakersfield, CA

#143 Mar 28, 2009
EXCLUSIVE: Hezbollah uses Mexican drug routes into U.S.
Works beside smuggler cartels to fund operations

Sara A. Carter ( Contact)
Friday, March 27, 2009
http://washingtontimes.com/news/2009/mar/27/h...

Hezbollah is using the same southern narcotics routes that Mexican drug kingpins do to smuggle drugs and people into the United States, reaping money to finance its operations and threatening U.S. national security, current and former U.S. law enforcement, defense and counterterrorism officials say.(Click link above for complete story)
Its Obvious

Ruidoso, NM

#144 Mar 29, 2009
Legalize Marijauna. Take the money out of the drug cartels pocket.

Concentrate enforcement on the routes being used to smuggle hard drugs, guns, humans and hezbollah interests.
Old Timer

Fresno, CA

#145 Mar 29, 2009
1. close the border, inspect all traffic coming and going.
2. finish the fence, the entire border.
3. Stop anchor babies.
4. Have the post office inspect all packages being shipped to mexico.
5. perform drug testing on anyone over 18, if they have a positive test, tax them $100 and make testing mandatory every week, quick way to raise money for the country, or a quick way to slow the demand.
6. Keep our head in the sand, and not worry about the problem.
7. Follow the Presidents lead, spend spend spend and the problem will go away.

“+Brutally Inquizitive+”

Since: Aug 08

Location hidden

#146 Mar 30, 2009
http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/dc/2009/03/o...
Obama Compares Mexico Violence to Capone
"Leave it to a Chicago guy like President Obama to compare the drug wars in Mexico to Eliot Ness cracking down on organized crime boss Al Capone.

“What’s happened is that [Mexican] President Calderon I think has been very bold and rightly has decided that it’s gotten carried away. The drug cartels have too much power, are undermining and corrupting huge segments of Mexican society. And so he has taken them on in the same way that when, you know, Eliot Ness took on Al Capone back during Prohibition, often times that causes even more violence. And we’re seeing that flare up,” Obama said in an interview on CBS’“Face the Nation” program.

Obama’s comment came days after he said he won’t legalize pot to help balance the budget (U.S. growers are believed to harvest a much more potent and readily available strain of marijuana than the green bud farmers south of the border).

Cocaine is a different story. Obama’s remarks followed the bold and accurate admission this week by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, another tough Chicagoan, who said that recreational drug users in the U.S. provide the biggest market for cocaine grown and processed in Central America and South America.

Now that’s untouchable."

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