Teachers without time to plan would be baby sitters - Hawaii Ed...

I write neither as a state Department of Education employee nor as a parent of a child in public school , but rather as an objective citizen. Full Story
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Wake up

Euclid, OH

#1 Nov 27, 2009
Public schools are day care centers to begin with. The material has always been there, but effective teaching methods never have - so it ain't goin matta either way.(yes, I went Public schools here) It's up to the parents to spend time with the keikis if they want to ensure that they get the lessons down - or, send them to private schools.
swannie

Ocean View, HI

#2 Nov 27, 2009
Wake up does have a point. I think many parents are too exhausted after a workday and cooking cleaning to bring a lot to do the teacher's job. One thing that would make teachers more effective is to reduce class size. Easy way to do that: flush out all those administration types that hide in offices all day long and strenuously avoid getting near students. A teacher who has the time to know a student is a lot more effective than a disciplinarian who is trying to ride herd on the rascals who take advantage of a large class to "act up".
realist

AOL

#3 Nov 27, 2009
What a crock! Teachers either know their subject or they do not. If they know their subject and have at least a few years of experience; planning days are not needed. If the teacher does not know their subject then they should not be in class and are only good for baby sitting. The writer here misses the point; Hawaii does not have endless supplies of money and we need to step back expenditures on everything including (most especially) education. Wake up Hawaii. Get a fixed curriculum, dump the central DOE office planners, cut overhead with consolidation of schools, and preserve school classroom days all at a lower cost.

Since: Nov 09

Keauhou, HI

#4 Nov 27, 2009
"Teachers have already done their part by sacrificing in these hard time".

Say what? What have teachers sacrificed, only the children as near as I can tell.
And yes Matthew, they are baby sitters. What do you think caused the public uproar in the first place. The first thing out of most parents mouths was "who is going to watch my kids". It was only after they figured out that they appeared to have selfish motives that the mantra changed to "short changing the kids".
I hope you have a thick skin because I think you're going to get a well deserved lambasting in this forum.
Realist

Wahiawa, HI

#5 Nov 27, 2009
DOE is a bloated, top heavy, ineffective bureaucracy. They sad part is the DOE negotiates educational policy with the administration. The bureaucracy will protect itself first, teachers second and students last. The DOE bureaucracy tries to spin the issue on teachers and students and steer the public interest away from the central district overhead and the little it contributes to overall student progress and achievement.
The optimum solution can not be achieved in this environment. Throwing more money at it simply achieves nothing.
As a tax payer, I do not support additional funding for DOE. As a grandparent with children in the public school system I am unhappy with all the proposals that are currently being discussed.
Without a radical overhaul of DOE from the Legislature the current dysfunction will continue.
Manolo

Honolulu, HI

#6 Nov 27, 2009
Wake up wrote:
Public schools are day care centers to begin with. The material has always been there, but effective teaching methods never have - so it ain't goin matta either way.(yes, I went Public schools here) It's up to the parents to spend time with the keikis if they want to ensure that they get the lessons down - or, send them to private schools.
Hey Wakeup you claimed to be a product of our public school system. Your statement that schools are a day care center does not reflect on your capabilities. It seems that they taught you well and you can digest a story and come up with a opinion on you views. You express your self well telling me that the public education you had did a good job. I agree that to further your child education you must supplement their education at home. But you must agree the basics were there and you are proof of that. Public schools are there to give you the skills. What you do with them is up to you. My children attended public school and all have made it to be contributing members in society. Like you say school does not stop after that 3pm bell and continues at home.
Old Timer

Kailua, HI

#7 Nov 27, 2009
Matt, you sure sound like one of the do nothing types hiding behind the DOE mantra. You are the type of fool that sure sounds self serving and need to join the real people at the state unemployment offices. Then you might come to realize that silver spoon has been broken off in your a--. You feasted from the trough during the good times, now join the rest of us for lean pickings during the famine.
swannie

Ocean View, HI

#8 Nov 27, 2009
Overhauling the entire education system...seems like a great time to do it. The state budget has everyone's attention. Good time to root out the drones and the corruption.
What Difference

Honolulu, HI

#9 Nov 27, 2009
When these same Teachers encourage 33% of their wards to fail public school, and not graduate, they are babysitters now, except current provided "goof off days" masked as "planning or training days."

More crybaby stuff from the HSTA union teachers----FIRE THEM ALL----get new blood straight out of college that want to teach.

Ronald Reagan fired each and every single Air Traffic Controller that got into the whole union mindset of "you owe us."

Never mind the HSTA teachers that send their spoiled brats to private school that they pay for with YOUR tax money----just FIRE THEM ALL.
Weisun

Honolulu, HI

#10 Nov 27, 2009
All of the hoopla surrounding the preservation of planning days creates an image that teachers engage in meaningful activity during those days. That image supports the larger picture of No Child Left Behind. Federal monies that are accompanied by compliance bureaucracies, and their snake-oil representatives from private contractors, are half of what is wrong with public education. The other half of public education that prevents learning from taking place are students who have no desire to learn and every desire to demand to only themselves the attention of their teachers with matters that reflect deficient parenting. If public education is to become the positive interface of the present and the future, which so many critics prescribe, then the legislature needs to face the fact that the current education system cannot serve the needs of both children who want to learn and children who want attention. Until the two types of children are separated into different types of learning environments, the notion that education is a profession is absurd. And, no matter how erudite the lesson plan is, every teacher must be able to improvise when the photocopy machine is under repair.

“Ultimate Kimchi Assassin!”

Since: Jun 08

Seoul

#11 Nov 27, 2009
I'm teacher and must say the importance of planning times varies with the subject and experience of the teacher. Sure, a veteran instructor with many years experience teaching the same class can get away with little prep. That's not to say they shouldn't tweak the course, but the main contents, presentation and materials are already there. Students can live without constant improvements and updates. However, planning and prep are paramount to new instructors and experienced instructors teaching a course they have never taught before. It is not uncommon for DOE instructors to be called upon to teach outside of their subject expertise, e.g., math instructor teaching music, band director teaching English, etc. Having peer support and time to develop and plan a new course is even more essential to instructors in the before mentioned situation.

On the other hand, education convention days, deemed professional development, where classes close and teachers meet for discussion groups and presentations is, at best, mildly helpful. I'd characterize them as being 90% a waste of time. They could be extremely useful if well planned and executed but such is never the case. I'm really tired of "thinking outside the box" and learning more educational jargon for things that already have names everybody understands.
Dee

Kaneohe, HI

#12 Nov 27, 2009
Not ALL... I would just take away tenure... That way, teachers can actually get fired for not doing their job. At private schools, contracts are offered annually and the administration is in no way obliged to offer a contract to all teachers. Also, at my school, letters of intent are offered instead of contracts in the case that a teacher needs to be replaced in the middle of the year.
What Difference wrote:
When these same Teachers encourage 33% of their wards to fail public school, and not graduate, they are babysitters now, except current provided "goof off days" masked as "planning or training days."
More crybaby stuff from the HSTA union teachers----FIRE THEM ALL----get new blood straight out of college that want to teach.
Ronald Reagan fired each and every single Air Traffic Controller that got into the whole union mindset of "you owe us."
Never mind the HSTA teachers that send their spoiled brats to private school that they pay for with YOUR tax money----just FIRE THEM ALL.
Another UnionShill

Barnesville, OH

#13 Nov 27, 2009
Lopresti claims:

"I write neither as a state Department of Education employee nor as a parent of a child in public school (yet), but rather as an objective citizen."

Uhhh... Lopresti is a far-left Democrat activist who worked to impeach Bush in 2007. In an online posting dated April 6, 2007 he writes...

"I live way out in Honolulu and I have been fortunate enough to suggest and help draft for the Hawaii State Senate, Senate Concurrent Resolution 83, requesting Congress to commence impeachment proceedings against the President and the Vice President of the United States."

Another liberal liar busted. And this one wasn't even hard to dig out.
RealityBased Community

Barnesville, OH

#14 Nov 27, 2009
Furlough negotiations:$50M ransom offered, but unions balk at releasing hostages

http://www.hawaiifreepress.com/main/ArticlesM...
Mrs Kealoha

Honolulu, HI

#15 Nov 27, 2009
Gegogi wrote:
I'm teacher and must say the importance of planning times varies with the subject and experience of the teacher. Sure, a veteran instructor with many years experience teaching the same class can get away with little prep. That's not to say they shouldn't tweak the course, but the main contents, presentation and materials are already there. Students can live without constant improvements and updates. However, planning and prep are paramount to new instructors and experienced instructors teaching a course they have never taught before. It is not uncommon for DOE instructors to be called upon to teach outside of their subject expertise, e.g., math instructor teaching music, band director teaching English, etc. Having peer support and time to develop and plan a new course is even more essential to instructors in the before mentioned situation.
On the other hand, education convention days, deemed professional development, where classes close and teachers meet for discussion groups and presentations is, at best, mildly helpful. I'd characterize them as being 90% a waste of time. They could be extremely useful if well planned and executed but such is never the case. I'm really tired of "thinking outside the box" and learning more educational jargon for things that already have names everybody understands.
The most obvious argument which you missed is that each year, each class is filled with DIFFERENT KIDS. The instruction, the activities, the lessons all need to be tailored to these kids... it is called DIFFERENTIATION and it REQUIRES lots of planning to be effective for children.

All you without a shred of research on education issues should shut the heck up and comment on something about which you have a CLUE. I'm tired of reading dumb comments. It's uneducational.:)
Mrs Kealoha

Honolulu, HI

#16 Nov 27, 2009
Another UnionShill wrote:
Lopresti claims:
"I write neither as a state Department of Education employee nor as a parent of a child in public school (yet), but rather as an objective citizen."
Uhhh... Lopresti is a far-left Democrat activist who worked to impeach Bush in 2007. In an online posting dated April 6, 2007 he writes...
"I live way out in Honolulu and I have been fortunate enough to suggest and help draft for the Hawaii State Senate, Senate Concurrent Resolution 83, requesting Congress to commence impeachment proceedings against the President and the Vice President of the United States."
Another liberal liar busted. And this one wasn't even hard to dig out.
And your point is??
scott mason

Honolulu, HI

#17 Nov 27, 2009
Far left..far right..who cares? Knowing that Bush & his VP lied to the American people and put an untold number of our young men and women in harm's way, wouldn't it be cause to impeach them? Who's administration came up with the bright idea of No Child Left Behind? The problem today and the next in terms of public education is that we have classes with a mixed academic background making it difficult to teach the slower kids and to easy for the faster kids. So what and how do you teach a course with such a mixed scholastic background? Can't be done no matter how many prep days you have throughout the year. The basic problem is that ACLU and other civil rights entities have caused a dumbing down of our educational system to cater to the rights of a small minority of students. I don't know how many prep days teachers have but they should be no more than two a quarter and they should be used to monitor the progress of the students and to make adjustments to the curriculum so that at the end of the year the teacher and the students have reached the goals established at the start of the school year.
Another UnionShill

Barnesville, OH

#18 Nov 27, 2009
Mrs Kealoha wrote:
<quoted text>
And your point is??
That he's just like you.
ummsuure

Aiea, HI

#19 Nov 27, 2009
Yeah, just what is your point?

The kala is in the system already. We shouldn't keep doing the same thing over and over. Consideration should be given to disassembling the DOE or at minimum get rid of the duplicitous positions.
Public School Product

Ewa Beach, HI

#20 Nov 27, 2009
When I went to school there was no such thing as "Teacher Instruction" day, nor were there so many days off that teachers took to "prepare". Yet we got a lot of learning and challenges. Since my young one has started, I was surprise of the many days off they had.

When I heard the reactions from parents about the furlough my first thought was “selfishness”. They did not think about their children and the lack of education they would have first, but thought about “now I have to inconvenience myself to stay home take care of my child or find a baby-sitter”. WOW!!! What a role-model those parents are; they care more about themselves and the inconvenience then their own child.

I have several friends that are teachers,“sacrifice?” they take far more abuse from parents then they should and they sacrifice themselves everyday. Word of advice “Parents your child is not the same at home and in school”. To tell teachers they don’t know how to do their job or they are wrong and their child are “angels” and couldn’t possible do this or that, well WAKE UP because they are not angels. Teachers spend the majority of your child’s waking hour’s with them; they see far more of whom they really are. Yet these teachers, despite the verbal abuse from parents and the threats from students, they get up every day and do their job to teach YOUR child. They bring their work home with them, stay up late at night, and practically have no social life because they are too busy giving YOUR child an education. Unless you have to take care of 30 children yourself each day, don't assume a teacher's job is easy because it's not.

Education is not for the teacher themselves to do alone; it’s a partnership with the parents. But the busyness of today’s society many parents “assume” that it’s the teacher’s fault that their child is not learning and it’s the school’s responsibility to provide their child with adult supervision instead of looking in the mirror to see who is the real person responsible for raising their child.

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