Sam I Am

Cedar Grove, TN

#83 Jan 23, 2013
Mutt, in consecutive posts by you:

"I can't imagine a grown adult being excited about books a 12yo likes."

Then in response to Tonka's "Why not? Is that not the intended audience? The author is considered a 'children's author'," you wrote: "It's also appealing to adults. That's what made it such a success."

Contradict yourself much?

There are numerous books and authors and other works that are considered enjoyable by both children and adults. Shel Silverstein, the Harry Potter series, many Disney movies, etc. This aversion of yours to grey areas is interesting.
pde

Homer Glen, IL

#84 Jan 23, 2013
I went back and looked, and he's talking about them reading together 50 novels over 18 years, so not just ages 12-18 but her being aged 12-30.
Sam I Am

Cedar Grove, TN

#85 Jan 23, 2013
j_m_w wrote:
1984, Animal Farm, Lord of the Flies, Brave New World, The Catcher in the Rye, The Handmaid's Tale... all assigned reading in middle school or high school, but I enjoyed them all.
I went to private school and had to buy all my own books; textbooks too.
The Catcher in the Rye is excellent. I would also throw in Of Mice and Men and Flowers for Algernon.

“The two baby belly, please!”

Since: Sep 09

Evanston IL

#86 Jan 23, 2013
pde wrote:
<quoted text>
I just read through that series of novels with a stunned OMG he got this published. He wrote the epitome of the Marty-Stu and it brought him fame and fortune.
And by the end, there was still a stunned OMG he got this published but there's also something more there.
Sorry, I'm not gettting the Marty-Stu reference.

And why the OMG? It's sci-fi; you can do anything and get away with it.
pde

Homer Glen, IL

#87 Jan 23, 2013
Here you go edog ... read the first couple pages and then tell us these are little girl's novels:

Edith Wharton
The Age of Innocence: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/541/541-h/541-...
Ethan Frome: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/4517/4517-h/45...
The House of Mirth: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/284/284-h/284-...

Jane Austen
Pride & Prejudice: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1342/1342-h/13...
Sense & Sensibility: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/161/161-h/161-...
Emma: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/158/158-h/158-...

Willa Cather
The Song of the Lark: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/44/44-h/44-h.h...
My Antonia: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/19810/19810-h/...
O Pioneers!: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/24/24-h/24-h.h...

(Margaret Mitchell and Daphne du Maurier are not public domain yet. Go to your local public library or bookstore.)
pde

Homer Glen, IL

#88 Jan 23, 2013
squishymama wrote:
<quoted text>
Sorry, I'm not gettting the Marty-Stu reference.
And why the OMG? It's sci-fi; you can do anything and get away with it.
Ever heard of Mary Sue?

( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Sue )

Marty-Stu is the male terminology.

For a while, I had a user icon on another site that said "Incest is canon in my fandom" It outraged many people.

“...,to wit”

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#89 Jan 23, 2013
edogxxx wrote:
<quoted text>
If you don't know the difference between a comic strip and a book, I doubt you'll be able to understand my trying explaining it to you.
The LW isn't talking about his adult daughter, but books she was reading at TWELVE. Sorry, but unless she's genius level, I can't imagine a grown adult being excited about books a 12yo likes.
You need to live with an 8-12 year old . I had great fun with The Mixed Up Files of Mrs Basil E Frankenthwailer ( or whatever) and I was an art history major. That was fun and it was not the only one.

“...,to wit”

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#90 Jan 23, 2013
pde wrote:
<quoted text>
Ever heard of Mary Sue?
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Sue )
Marty-Stu is the male terminology.
For a while, I had a user icon on another site that said "Incest is canon in my fandom" It outraged many people.
I never knew that.
pde

Homer Glen, IL

#91 Jan 23, 2013
PEllen wrote:
<quoted text>
You need to live with an 8-12 year old . I had great fun with The Mixed Up Files of Mrs Basil E Frankenthwailer ( or whatever) and I was an art history major. That was fun and it was not the only one.
Ronald Dahl books are great fun to read aloud.

Since: Mar 09

Miami, FL

#92 Jan 23, 2013
pde wrote:
<quoted text>
Ronald Dahl books are great fun to read aloud.
I remember our second grade teacher reading us James and the Giant Peach and The Witches. I re-read both on my own as well. I loved Roald Dahl.

“The two baby belly, please!”

Since: Sep 09

Evanston IL

#93 Jan 23, 2013
pde wrote:
<quoted text>
Ever heard of Mary Sue?
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Sue )
Marty-Stu is the male terminology.
For a while, I had a user icon on another site that said "Incest is canon in my fandom" It outraged many people.
I had never heard of that.

And I guess I never really considered the true incestous nature of some of the relationshiops in Heinlein's work. I was willing to suspend my disbelief and just thought "well, when in Rome..."

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#94 Jan 23, 2013
Have any of you read the Neil Gaiman/Terry Pratchett book "Good Omens"? I've heard it's been optioned as a movie. If done well, it could be a masterpiece of a movie.
pde

Homer Glen, IL

#95 Jan 23, 2013
pde wrote:
(Margaret Mitchell and Daphne du Maurier are not public domain yet. Go to your local public library or bookstore.)
Daphne du Maurier, summary of Rebecca (most likely the novel being referred to): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebecca_%28novel...

Margaret Mitchell, summary of Gone with the Wind: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gone_with_the_Wi...
pde

Homer Glen, IL

#96 Jan 23, 2013
squishymama wrote:
<quoted text>
I had never heard of that.
And I guess I never really considered the true incestous nature of some of the relationshiops in Heinlein's work. I was willing to suspend my disbelief and just thought "well, when in Rome..."
He slept with his mother, his sister, and his own twin daughters. Among many, many others ...

And isn't the time-traveling circumstance of how he first slept with his mother retold twice, in two different novels? From both his perspective and hers.
pde

Homer Glen, IL

#97 Jan 23, 2013
RedheadwGlasses wrote:
Have any of you read the Neil Gaiman/Terry Pratchett book "Good Omens"? I've heard it's been optioned as a movie. If done well, it could be a masterpiece of a movie.
If done badly, it could be like the abuse visited upon Prachett's Discworld novels ... although Hogfather was half a good movie and half, I suspect, "we ran out of money".
Sam I Am

Cedar Grove, TN

#98 Jan 23, 2013
pde wrote:
<quoted text>
Ronald Dahl books are great fun to read aloud.
Roald Dahl is excellent. If you have not read Danny, the Champion of the World, you should.

“Fort Kickass”

Since: Sep 09

Bloomington, IL

#99 Jan 23, 2013
j_m_w wrote:
<quoted text>
I remember our second grade teacher reading us James and the Giant Peach and The Witches. I re-read both on my own as well. I loved Roald Dahl.
Me too. I think I read pretty much all of his kid stuff and some of his grown up stuff.

“The two baby belly, please!”

Since: Sep 09

Evanston IL

#100 Jan 23, 2013
pde wrote:
<quoted text>
He slept with his mother, his sister, and his own twin daughters. Among many, many others ...
Well, when you live for over 2000 years, you gotta do *something* to keep it interesting.
:D
pde wrote:
And isn't the time-traveling circumstance of how he first slept with his mother retold twice, in two different novels? From both his perspective and hers.
Yes.

“Fort Kickass”

Since: Sep 09

Bloomington, IL

#101 Jan 23, 2013
Sam I Am wrote:
<quoted text>
Roald Dahl is excellent. If you have not read Danny, the Champion of the World, you should.
That one was my favorite. And I remember dragging my feet on reading it because it didn't have the whimsical feel of, say, a Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or a BFG.

I still kind of want to live in a gypsy caravan...
pde

Homer Glen, IL

#102 Jan 23, 2013
squishymama wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, when you live for over 2000 years, you gotta do *something* to keep it interesting.
:D
<quoted text>
At the end of the 2000 years, it's like 3 degrees of DNA separation from Lazarus with most of the Howard humans still alive. Just think of how many descendents that is ...

Oh, and I guess I forgot. The twins weren't his daughters. They were his clones. So, he slept with two of himself turned female. Can that even be called incest?

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