pde

Palatine, IL

#62 Jan 23, 2013
edogxxx wrote:
<quoted text>
What's it about?
Partly, retelling the story of the crucifixion. In a way particularly colored by the fact it was written in Soviet Russia. Also, in a way that's not particularly respectful of the biblical version.
pde

Palatine, IL

#63 Jan 23, 2013
squishymama wrote:
<quoted text>
His Dark Materials is pretty good too. They made a movie of the first one, The Golden Compass, but it was sort of a flop. Don't expect to be seeing the other two.
Also heard an interview with the guy who wrote the Guardians of Childhood series. I might have to find those too.
The movie is kind of godawful but the series is quite good. That one might also make edog hopping mad. My mom had three copies of the series in her classroom library and her principal got sent one of those "why His Dark Materials series is blasphemy" memes and the principal came and trashed them all.

I also could not stand the Hunger Games series. But I'm sure the kid will want to read it in two or three years.
pde

Palatine, IL

#65 Jan 23, 2013
PEllen wrote:
<quoted text>SciFi classics get dated very quickly and not just from a technology standpoint.
I recently re-read Stranger in a Strange Land and cringed. Dune was a little better but its politics hit you between teh ye, something I didn't catch in 1969.
Ok, my other post got moderated and I have no idea why. Perhaps the author name, so I will leave it out.

I recently reread the Robots series and the Foundation series, and as long as you ignore actual dates where they appear, they are otherwise surprisingly not dated.

“I Am Mine”

Since: Dec 08

Location hidden

#66 Jan 23, 2013
edogxxx wrote:
I wouldn't consider Harry Potter.. "children's books,"
Why not? Is that not the intended audience? The author is considered a "children's author".

There is a special Harry Potter section on Scholastic.com .
http://harrypotter.scholastic.com/

Harry Potter books show up on Barnses and Noble in the 9-12 kids section
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s...

Amazon rates it for ages 8 and up.

“...,to wit”

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#67 Jan 23, 2013
pde wrote:
<quoted text>
Ok, my other post got moderated and I have no idea why. Perhaps the author name, so I will leave it out.
I recently reread the Robots series and the Foundation series, and as long as you ignore actual dates where they appear, they are otherwise surprisingly not dated.
That is the essential difference between Isaac Azimov and Heinlien/Herbert. Re-reading Foundation was weird because so much of teh technolog has caught up wth teh book. Did you see when they were published, though?
Half a centrury ago for FSM sake!

“I Am Mine”

Since: Dec 08

Location hidden

#68 Jan 23, 2013
Toj wrote:
I absolutely hated reading in school and never did it for fun.
I never read a single book for personal enjoyment until that time in between college and finding my first job when I had a lot of free time on my hands and little to do. Now I mainly read when I'm on vacation away from the internet and tv.

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#69 Jan 23, 2013
I have been a reader my whole life, but didn't care for the "classics" we were required to read in school (and there weren't many). On my own as an adult, I decided to read classics. THe first one I read was "THe Grapes of Wrath" and it was AMAZING. I want to see the HEnry FOnda movie now.
pde

Palatine, IL

#70 Jan 23, 2013
PEllen wrote:
<quoted text>That is the essential difference between Isaac Azimov and Heinlien/Herbert. Re-reading Foundation was weird because so much of teh technolog has caught up wth teh book. Did you see when they were published, though?
Half a centrury ago for FSM sake!
Oh, but come on, Lazarus Long is the BOMB! ;)

“A Programmer is not in IT!”

Since: Feb 09

Neda, stay with me! Charlie

#71 Jan 23, 2013
Why are comic strips different?
Calvin and Hobbs appeals to all age groups. If I had never heard of it, and my daughter asked me to read it (because of our agreement), I believe I would have been delighted to discover it, and have her to thank for it.

Seems to me a perfect example of what the LW was trying to convey.


Or, is that more than you can understand?
edogxxx wrote:
<quoted text>
Calvin and Hobbs is a comic strip, so there's a difference there. I wouldn't consider Harry Potter and James Patterson "children's books," as for Dr Suess and the rest... no comment...

“The two baby belly, please!”

Since: Sep 09

Evanston IL

#72 Jan 23, 2013
pde wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh, but come on, Lazarus Long is the BOMB! ;)
Whether or not Heinlein's stories hold up (personally I think they do), Lazarus is a unique and memorable character.
Sam I Am

Memphis, TN

#73 Jan 23, 2013
Mister Tonka wrote:
<quoted text>Why not? Is that not the intended audience? The author is considered a "children's author".
There is a special Harry Potter section on Scholastic.com .
http://harrypotter.scholastic.com/
Harry Potter books show up on Barnses and Noble in the 9-12 kids section
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s...
Amazon rates it for ages 8 and up.
It would be disheartening for him to accept that something he finds challenging is easily mastered by someone who just mastered tying their shoes.

Toj

“Where is Everyone?”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#74 Jan 23, 2013
RedheadwGlasses wrote:
I have been a reader my whole life, but didn't care for the "classics" we were required to read in school (and there weren't many). On my own as an adult, I decided to read classics. THe first one I read was "THe Grapes of Wrath" and it was AMAZING. I want to see the HEnry FOnda movie now.
My parents did not discourage reading but they did not exactly encourage it either.

Math and exploring was encouraged through play and schoolwork. I guess that's why those are the subjects everyone is best at in my family.
Sam I Am

Memphis, TN

#75 Jan 23, 2013
I think Calvin and Hobbes is delightful and definitely has an adult component to it. Doonesbury is in comic strip format, but it is hardly directed at children.

“reign in blood”

Since: May 09

Melrose Park, IL

#76 Jan 23, 2013
RACE wrote:
Why are comic strips different?
ByCalvin and Hobbs appeals to all age groups. If I had never heard of it, and my daughter asked me to read it (because of our agreement), I believe I would have been delighted to discover it, and have her to thank for it.
Seems to me a perfect example of what the LW was trying to convey.
Or, is that more than you can understand?
<quoted text>
If you don't know the difference between a comic strip and a book, I doubt you'll be able to understand my trying explaining it to you.
The LW isn't talking about his adult daughter, but books she was reading at TWELVE. Sorry, but unless she's genius level, I can't imagine a grown adult being excited about books a 12yo likes.

“reign in blood”

Since: May 09

Melrose Park, IL

#77 Jan 23, 2013
Mister Tonka wrote:
<quoted text>Why not? Is that not the intended audience? The author is considered a "children's author".
It's also appealing to adults. That's what made it such a success. Whereas books by Dr Suess and R.L. Stein are specifically for kids.

Since: Mar 09

Miami, FL

#78 Jan 23, 2013
1984, Animal Farm, Lord of the Flies, Brave New World, The Catcher in the Rye, The Handmaid's Tale... all assigned reading in middle school or high school, but I enjoyed them all.

I went to private school and had to buy all my own books; textbooks too.

“reign in blood”

Since: May 09

Melrose Park, IL

#79 Jan 23, 2013
RedheadwGlasses wrote:
<quoted text>
No, those authors' books are covered in high school and college lit courses.
Not any of the ones I had.
pde

Palatine, IL

#80 Jan 23, 2013
squishymama wrote:
<quoted text>
Whether or not Heinlein's stories hold up (personally I think they do), Lazarus is a unique and memorable character.
I just read through that series of novels with a stunned OMG he got this published. He wrote the epitome of the Marty-Stu and it brought him fame and fortune.

And by the end, there was still a stunned OMG he got this published but there's also something more there.

Toj

“Where is Everyone?”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#81 Jan 23, 2013
RACE wrote:
Why are comic strips different?
Calvin and Hobbs appeals to all age groups. If I had never heard of it, and my daughter asked me to read it (because of our agreement), I believe I would have been delighted to discover it, and have her to thank for it.
Seems to me a perfect example of what the LW was trying to convey.
Or, is that more than you can understand?
<quoted text>
I have to go with the dog on this one. It's like reading the back of a cereal box and counting that as literature.

Don't get me wrong, I love Calvin & Hobbes.
pde

Palatine, IL

#82 Jan 23, 2013
edogxxx wrote:
<quoted text>
The LW isn't talking about his adult daughter, but books she was reading at TWELVE. Sorry, but unless she's genius level, I can't imagine a grown adult being excited about books a 12yo likes.
He talked about this going on over the years that she was 12-18. I actually doubt she was reading any of her named "favorite" authors at 12, because that is a little young for any of them. Most of the authors named wrote pretty dense works, several on par with Charles Dickens for language usage.

(I'm recalling that Willa Cather might be a little less dense than the other authors on the list, but all I've ever read by her is My Antonia. I've read a lot more by the rest of the authors listed.)

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