Messianic Jews say they are persecuted in Israel

Full story: Newsday

Safety pins and screws are still lodged in 15-year-old Ami Ortiz's body three months after he opened a booby-trapped gift basket sent to his family.

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former res

Cheshire, CT

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#53535
May 27, 2013
 
HughBe wrote:
<quoted text>
HughBe--- Are you really saying that Jesus was not born? Prove otherwise.
It is on you to prove he was born and lived and esp that he was the son of your god.

It is not on me to prove a negative.

And, again, your education and thinking come into question.
Voluntarist

United States

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#53536
May 27, 2013
 
Happy memorial day to all let us all take a moment of silence to remember those that made the ultimate sacrifice for all of you to continue your enslavement.
former res

Cheshire, CT

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#53537
May 27, 2013
 
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>
I like route 8 a lot. I plan on hiking a bunch in Litchfield and E Hartford via that corridor. Despite the local lore about that valley and all the fun we used to make of the people who lived there when I was a kid (hillbillies of CT).
Been reading a great book on CT geology - "The Face of CT". Did you know that you live in the red soil area of CT?(brownstone valleys with basaltic trap rock ridges, formed back in the days of the dinosaurs (Mesozoic) under a tropical climate - just like the Newark basin in NJ)
Never heard of the "hillbillies of CT" - that sounds pretty interesting. Are they still around?

Is the Newark basin related to the Delaware Water Gap? Canoed there as a Boy Scout. Also on the Housatonic in CT. Up north. Went to car races too at Lyme Rock as a teen.

A lot going on for a small state. Much for us to explore after my being away 30+ years.
former res

Cheshire, CT

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#53538
May 27, 2013
 
Frijoles wrote:
Hey FR
How do you celebrate Christmas? Do you give presents? Have a tree? Eat a meal with your greater family?
Yes, we do all that and enjoy it very much.

And we have stocking hanging over the fireplace.

And I even go to church from time to time.

Also Christian weddings, funerals, confirmations etc.
former res

Cheshire, CT

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#53539
May 27, 2013
 
HughBe wrote:
HughBe--- I am not a Korean. It seems that YOUR greatness resided more in the mind and this was demonstrated in the war with Korea..
Can't win em all.

What is the last war Jamaica won?
HughBe wrote:
HughBe---What would happen is that you will develop a bad technique but although it is bad or not what is regarded as best practice it could still be effective..
Moron.

Who can't admit when he was wrong.

Not a gentleman but a very small, petty person.

I'm disappointed in you.
HughBe wrote:
Former--We know the cars are made by humans. We agreed on that, right?
HughBe--- I accept but I don't know. As far as I am concerned cars could be made by Martians. I have no EVIDENCE of the makers..
Thank you for showing me inside the mind of a truly muddled, confused thinker.

One of many who believes in fantasies and builds his whole way of life around them.

I believe it would suck to be you. At least for me it would.
former res

Cheshire, CT

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#53540
May 27, 2013
 
Cult of Reason wrote:
<quoted text>
Excellent. Where did you move to?
Cheshire.

Nice quiet town.(Home invasion of a few years back notwithstanding.)

We back up on some woods.

Only an hour from mom's now vs 2 1/2 when we lived in PA.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

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#53541
May 28, 2013
 
HughBe wrote:
<quoted text>
Simplifying, Christians who celebrate Christmas do so because they are celebrating a REAL EVENT and not an imaginary events as in the case of Purim.
Hmmmmmmmmmmm
Cult of Reason wrote:
<quoted text>
I can answer YES to all of that.
In addition, I've been known to frequent churches as well.
And yet, I'm an atheist.
A secular Christian is one who par takes in Christian traditions for, well, traditions sake, without the underlying belief system, but I suspect Huggy knew that but chose to ignore it as it doesn't jive with his narrative.
former res wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, we do all that and enjoy it very much.
And we have stocking hanging over the fireplace.
And I even go to church from time to time.
Also Christian weddings, funerals, confirmations etc.
As you can see, you dont have to BELIEVE in the in history of the holiday in order to celebrate it meaningfully.

Whether or not these fine young men here are secular, atheist, or agnostic is not the point (I also know MANY self identified religious Christians who also dont believe the nonsense of the history).

----------

However, if you are interested in promoting your side point, by YOUR rules, I would label these fine young men as ethnically Christian but religiously not.

And by your SAME rules (regardless of whether I believe in these rules or not - which I don't), I would declare, that these fine young men also demonstrate that Christianity is OBVIOUSLY NOT the ONLY religion of the Christians, that there are Atheist Christians Agnostic Christians, etc etc etc....

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

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#53542
May 28, 2013
 
former res wrote:
<quoted text>
Never heard of the "hillbillies of CT" - that sounds pretty interesting. Are they still around?
Is the Newark basin related to the Delaware Water Gap? Canoed there as a Boy Scout. Also on the Housatonic in CT. Up north. Went to car races too at Lyme Rock as a teen.
A lot going on for a small state. Much for us to explore after my being away 30+ years.
Newark Basin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newark_Basin

The same geology underlies the I91 corridor, where you live. Red valley soils punctuated by trap rock Basaltic (volcanic) ridgelines. Compare your soil with the soil at your Moms, Sis, and Bro. 100% different in color.

Upper Housatonic valley is cut into Marble deposits - remnant of old sea millions of years ago on edge of original North American continent, before all the continents merged together as Pangaea

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

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#53543
May 28, 2013
 
former res wrote:
<quoted text>
Wow - in PA we had groundhogs, possums, even a fox, of course deer, many deer - and here we had a wild turkey the other day.
Small world. My wife read that we shouldn't feed the wild turkey as they attract coyotes, evidently their only natural predator in these parts.
And if we still had a small dog, coyotes would be a bad thing.(We may get a dog again one day....a toy poodle could make a nice snack for a wild dog)
Where you live now you have bobcats, bears, and every few years a stray moose. Up on the ridges you have the last real habitat for Copperheads in CT (yes there are there - no I havent seen them).

You also have a rare salamander or newt that only lives on the ridges (I forget the name)

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

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#53544
May 28, 2013
 
Cult of Reason wrote:
<quoted text>
There was an article in the paper about it a few months ago. If I recall correctly, you have a pit bull, right? I'm pretty sure he can defend himself (and you) if push comes to shove.
Thanks.

I think the area they are referring to is a block east of the dealership - Rosa Hartman park on the border.

You think my pit bull can defend itself? lol. Obviously you never met my couch potato pit bull. She has been in 2 fights in her life - both time attacked in a public park. Once by a Golden retriever, once by a Pekingese. BOTH times myself or my wife had to pick her up in the middle of the fray and carry her away so she couldnt get hurt.

A few years ago I was walking with her in a small pocket park of woods in a Boston -(not too far from where the bomber was caught) and we got stalked by a coyote. That scared the crap out of me. I had to pick her up and walk out of the woods with her in my arms. Since then I never leave her out of my sight in the woods anywhere.
former res

Cheshire, CT

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#53545
May 28, 2013
 
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>
Newark Basin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newark_Basin
The same geology underlies the I91 corridor, where you live. Red valley soils punctuated by trap rock Basaltic (volcanic) ridgelines. Compare your soil with the soil at your Moms, Sis, and Bro. 100% different in color.
Upper Housatonic valley is cut into Marble deposits - remnant of old sea millions of years ago on edge of original North American continent, before all the continents merged together as Pangaea
The wife says she has noticed something different about the soil here, from gardening, planting already. She said it seems more clay-like.

She wants to know what implications this might have for planting etc.

And I want to know about the hillbillies!
former res

Cheshire, CT

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#53546
May 28, 2013
 
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>
Where you live now you have bobcats, bears, and every few years a stray moose. Up on the ridges you have the last real habitat for Copperheads in CT (yes there are there - no I havent seen them).
You also have a rare salamander or newt that only lives on the ridges (I forget the name)
I bet a bobcat could be a menace to little dog as well. Not to mention what a bear could do, even to a pitbull. Never thought about snakes - good to know.

We're one climate cooler here than we were in PA. Which feels great to me.

Someone told me however that north of the Merrit is hotter and drier in the summer and colder in the winter.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

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#53547
May 28, 2013
 
former res wrote:
<quoted text>
\
And I want to know about the hillbillies!
The hillbillies live in the Naugatuck valley (known locally as the "valley", but dont confuse that with the CT River (I91) valley where you live in (and dont confuse that with the fact that the CT river actually veers east and out of the I91 valley somewhere south of Hartford so the CT river valley in CT no longer has the CT river).

These days there a lot of people living in the "valley" that are transplants from Fairfield County who realized the good land deals and still commute my way.

But there are still natives around as well.

The "Valley" is basically Waterbury (or above?) down to Shelton. Stratford is technically in the valley but the people are different since it is coastal. No hillbillies but there are strange creatures in the forest in Stratford and Shelton called Melonheads.

Check out the valley towns. Seymour is known for their antiques and their casket factory.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

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#53548
May 28, 2013
 
former res wrote:
<quoted text>
I bet a bobcat could be a menace to little dog as well. Not to mention what a bear could do, even to a pitbull. Never thought about snakes - good to know.
We're one climate cooler here than we were in PA. Which feels great to me.
Someone told me however that north of the Merrit is hotter and drier in the summer and colder in the winter.
I think that is true (the hotter and drier). I go up to Ridgefield a lot to work and the air seems hotter and more stagnant. Below RT 15, we have more coastal air patterns.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

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#53549
May 28, 2013
 
former res wrote:
<quoted text>
The wife says she has noticed something different about the soil here, from gardening, planting already. She said it seems more clay-like.
She wants to know what implications this might have for planting etc.
https://soilseries.sc.egov.usda.gov/OSD_Docs/...

CHESHIRE SOIL SERIES

The Cheshire series consists of very deep, well drained loamy soils formed in supraglacial till on uplands. They are nearly level through very steep soils on till plains and hills. Slope ranges from 0 through 60 percent. Saturated hydraulic conductivity is moderately high or high throughout. Mean annual temperature is about 50 degrees F., and mean annual precipitation is about 47 inches.
TAXONOMIC CLASS: Coarse-loamy, mixed, semiactive, mesic Typic Dystrudepts

TYPICAL PEDON: Cheshire fine sandy loam - cultivated field.(Colors are for moist soil unless otherwise noted.)

Ap-- 0 to 8 inches; dark brown (7.5YR 3/2) fine sandy loam, pinkish gray (7.5YR 6/2) dry; weak medium granular structure; friable; common fine roots; 5 percent gravel; strongly acid; clear wavy boundary.(6 to 10 inches thick.)

Bw1-- 8 to 16 inches; reddish brown (5YR 4/4) fine sandy loam; weak medium subangular blocky structure; friable; few fine roots; 10 percent gravel; strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary.

Bw2-- 16 to 26 inches; reddish brown (5YR 5/4) fine sandy loam; weak medium subangular blocky structure; very friable; few fine roots; 10 percent gravel; strongly acid; clear wavy boundary.(Combined thickness of the Bw horizons is 12 to 35 inches.)

C-- 26 to 65 inches; reddish brown (2.5YR 4/4) gravelly sandy loam; massive; very friable with firm lenses; 20 percent gravel and cobbles; strongly acid.

TYPE LOCATION: New Haven County, Connecticut; town of Wallingford, 50 feet east of Northford Road and 500 feet north of the junction of Northford and Anderson Roads. USGS Wallingford topographic quadrangle, Latitude 41 degrees, 24 minutes, 57 seconds N., Longitude 72 degrees, 46 minutes, 23 seconds W., NAD 1927.

RANGE IN CHARACTERISTICS: Thickness of the solum ranges from 20 through 38 inches. Depth to bedrock is commonly more than 6 feet. Rock fragments range from 5 to 35 percent by volume throughout the soil. Except where the surface is stony, the fragments are mostly subrounded gravel and typically make up 60 percent or more of the total rock fragments. Unless limed, reaction ranges from is very strongly acid through moderately acid.

The Ap horizon has hue of 5YR through 10YR, value of 3 or 4, and chroma of 2 through 4. Dry value is 6 or more. Undisturbed pedons have a thin A horizon with value of 2 or 3 and chroma of 1 through 3. The Ap or A horizon is sandy loam to silt loam in the fine-earth fraction. It has weak or moderate granular structure and is friable or very friable.

The Bw horizon has hue of 2.5YR or 5YR, value of 3 through 5, and chroma of 3 through 6. It is sandy loam to silt loam in the fine-earth fraction. The Bw horizon has weak granular or subangular blocky structure, or it is massive. Consistence is friable or very friable.

Some pedons have a BC horizon.

The C horizon has hue of 10R to 5YR, value of 3 or 4, and chroma of 3 through 6. It is sandy loam, fine sandy loam, or loam in the fine-earth fraction. Pockets or thin lenses of loamy sand are in some pedons. The horizon is massive or it has weak platy structure. Consistence is commonly very friable or friable, but the range includes firm.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

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#53550
May 28, 2013
 
CHESHIRE SOIL SERIES Continued....

COMPETING SERIES: There are no other soils in the same family.

The Ashe, Brookfield, Buladean, Cardigan, Chadakoin, Charlton, Chatfield, Chestnut, Ditney, Dutchess, Edneyville, Fedscreek, Hazel, Lordstown, Marrowbone, Maymead, Newport, Riverhead, Soco, St. Albans, Stecoah, Steinsburg, Stinger, Tipshaw, Valois, and Yalesville soils are in closely related families. Ashe, Cardigan, Chatfield, Ditney, Hazel, Lordstown, Marrowbone, Steinsburg, and Yalesville soils are 20 to 40 inches deep to bedrock. Brookfield soils have many mica flakes, are dominated by micaceous schist rock fragments, and have 7.5YR or yellower hue in the C horizon. Charlton, Dutchess, Fedscreek, Maymead, St. Albans, and Valois soils have hue of 7.5YR or yellower in the B and C horizons. Chestnut soils formed in residuum and have weathered bedrock at a depth of 20 to 40 inches. Edneyville soils formed in residuum and have a C horizon of saprolite. Riverhead soils have a stratified sand and gravel substratum within a 20 to 40 inch depth. Satsop soils receive 60 to 80 inches of precipitation annually.

GEOGRAPHIC SETTING: Cheshire soils are nearly level through very steep and are on till plains and upland hills. Slope ranges from 0 through 60 percent. The soils formed in acid glacial till derived mostly from reddish sandstone, shale, and conglomerate with some basalt. Mean annual temperature ranges from 45 through 52 degrees F., mean annual precipitation ranges from 40 through 50 inches, and the growing season ranges from 130 through 185 days.

GEOGRAPHICALLY ASSOCIATED SOILS: These are the Berlin, Branford, Broadbrook, Ellington, Hartford, Holyoke, Ludlow, Manchester, Menlo, Penwood, Wapping, Watchaug, Wethersfield, Wilbraham, and Yalesville soils. The moderately well drained Watchaug soils are associated in a drainage sequence. Berlin soils are on lacustrine terraces. Branford, Ellington, Hartford, Manchester, and Penwood soils are on nearby outwash terraces and are underlain by stratified sand and gravel. Broadbrook, Ludlow, and Wethersfield soils have a dense substratum. Holyoke soils have bedrock within a 10 to 20 inch depth. Menlo and Wilbraham soils are very poorly drained and poorly drained, respectively. Wapping soils are moderately well drained and have 7.5YR or yellower hue in the B horizon.

DRAINAGE AND SATURATED HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY: Well drained. Surface runoff is medium to rapid. Saturated hydraulic conductivity is moderately high or high throughout.

USE AND VEGETATION: Many areas are cleared and used for cultivated crops, hay, or pasture. Some areas are used for vegetables, nursery stock, and other specialty crops. Scattered areas are used for community development. Stony areas are mostly wooded. Common trees are northern red, white, and black oak, hickory, ash, sugar maple, red maple, gray birch, eastern white pine, and eastern hemlock.

DISTRIBUTION AND EXTENT: Glaciated uplands of Connecticut, Massachusetts, and in southeastern New York. MLRAs 144A and 145. The series is of moderate extent.

MLRA SOIL SURVEY REGIONAL OFFICE (MO) RESPONSIBLE: Amherst, Massachusetts

SERIES ESTABLISHED: Hamden County, Massachusetts, 1928.

REMARKS: This revision reflects change in soil taxonomy to the 8th edition of the Keys and general updating. Cation exchange activity class placement based upon limited lab data and a review of similar and associated soils.

Diagnostic horizons and features recognized in this pedon are:
1. Ochric epipedon - the zone from 0 to 8 inches (Ap horizon).
2. Cambic horizon - the zone from 8 to 26 inches (Bw horizons).

National Cooperative Soil Survey
U.S.A.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

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#53551
May 28, 2013
 
There will be no exam.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

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#53552
May 28, 2013
 
I have no clue what the implications are for gardening - regarding fertility - except to note that the soils, since they are derived from crumbly sedimentary deposits, lack the large rocks ( farm potatoes) that we have here, and that historically the farming has been much better in your (CT river) valley than here.

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#53553
May 28, 2013
 
FR

and by the way, I am assuming the soils were you live ARE the Cheshire Soil Series. They might not be. There are half a dozen related soils found in your area. I would need the address to narrow it down further, and then a field visit to confirm. And then I would send you a bill. lol.

Since: May 13

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#53554
May 28, 2013
 
The dunce, who has a doctorate in science, is online posting garbage on soils (that he's copied from some website). ROFL. He doesn't even know the difference between valence and oxidation state; or the difference between mole and equivalent; or the difference among normality, molarity, molality and formality. Ask the dunce a simple question on the scientific principles involved or on the accompanying calculations based on the chemical equations/the chemical concepts and he'll flee the scene in embarrassment. He's not only a dunce but a fanatic and a biased jerk as well. Shameless creature. LOL.

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