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“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#53549 May 28, 2013
former res wrote:
<quoted text>
The wife says she has noticed something different about the soil here, from gardening, planting already. She said it seems more clay-like.
She wants to know what implications this might have for planting etc.
https://soilseries.sc.egov.usda.gov/OSD_Docs/...

CHESHIRE SOIL SERIES

The Cheshire series consists of very deep, well drained loamy soils formed in supraglacial till on uplands. They are nearly level through very steep soils on till plains and hills. Slope ranges from 0 through 60 percent. Saturated hydraulic conductivity is moderately high or high throughout. Mean annual temperature is about 50 degrees F., and mean annual precipitation is about 47 inches.
TAXONOMIC CLASS: Coarse-loamy, mixed, semiactive, mesic Typic Dystrudepts

TYPICAL PEDON: Cheshire fine sandy loam - cultivated field.(Colors are for moist soil unless otherwise noted.)

Ap-- 0 to 8 inches; dark brown (7.5YR 3/2) fine sandy loam, pinkish gray (7.5YR 6/2) dry; weak medium granular structure; friable; common fine roots; 5 percent gravel; strongly acid; clear wavy boundary.(6 to 10 inches thick.)

Bw1-- 8 to 16 inches; reddish brown (5YR 4/4) fine sandy loam; weak medium subangular blocky structure; friable; few fine roots; 10 percent gravel; strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary.

Bw2-- 16 to 26 inches; reddish brown (5YR 5/4) fine sandy loam; weak medium subangular blocky structure; very friable; few fine roots; 10 percent gravel; strongly acid; clear wavy boundary.(Combined thickness of the Bw horizons is 12 to 35 inches.)

C-- 26 to 65 inches; reddish brown (2.5YR 4/4) gravelly sandy loam; massive; very friable with firm lenses; 20 percent gravel and cobbles; strongly acid.

TYPE LOCATION: New Haven County, Connecticut; town of Wallingford, 50 feet east of Northford Road and 500 feet north of the junction of Northford and Anderson Roads. USGS Wallingford topographic quadrangle, Latitude 41 degrees, 24 minutes, 57 seconds N., Longitude 72 degrees, 46 minutes, 23 seconds W., NAD 1927.

RANGE IN CHARACTERISTICS: Thickness of the solum ranges from 20 through 38 inches. Depth to bedrock is commonly more than 6 feet. Rock fragments range from 5 to 35 percent by volume throughout the soil. Except where the surface is stony, the fragments are mostly subrounded gravel and typically make up 60 percent or more of the total rock fragments. Unless limed, reaction ranges from is very strongly acid through moderately acid.

The Ap horizon has hue of 5YR through 10YR, value of 3 or 4, and chroma of 2 through 4. Dry value is 6 or more. Undisturbed pedons have a thin A horizon with value of 2 or 3 and chroma of 1 through 3. The Ap or A horizon is sandy loam to silt loam in the fine-earth fraction. It has weak or moderate granular structure and is friable or very friable.

The Bw horizon has hue of 2.5YR or 5YR, value of 3 through 5, and chroma of 3 through 6. It is sandy loam to silt loam in the fine-earth fraction. The Bw horizon has weak granular or subangular blocky structure, or it is massive. Consistence is friable or very friable.

Some pedons have a BC horizon.

The C horizon has hue of 10R to 5YR, value of 3 or 4, and chroma of 3 through 6. It is sandy loam, fine sandy loam, or loam in the fine-earth fraction. Pockets or thin lenses of loamy sand are in some pedons. The horizon is massive or it has weak platy structure. Consistence is commonly very friable or friable, but the range includes firm.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#53550 May 28, 2013
CHESHIRE SOIL SERIES Continued....

COMPETING SERIES: There are no other soils in the same family.

The Ashe, Brookfield, Buladean, Cardigan, Chadakoin, Charlton, Chatfield, Chestnut, Ditney, Dutchess, Edneyville, Fedscreek, Hazel, Lordstown, Marrowbone, Maymead, Newport, Riverhead, Soco, St. Albans, Stecoah, Steinsburg, Stinger, Tipshaw, Valois, and Yalesville soils are in closely related families. Ashe, Cardigan, Chatfield, Ditney, Hazel, Lordstown, Marrowbone, Steinsburg, and Yalesville soils are 20 to 40 inches deep to bedrock. Brookfield soils have many mica flakes, are dominated by micaceous schist rock fragments, and have 7.5YR or yellower hue in the C horizon. Charlton, Dutchess, Fedscreek, Maymead, St. Albans, and Valois soils have hue of 7.5YR or yellower in the B and C horizons. Chestnut soils formed in residuum and have weathered bedrock at a depth of 20 to 40 inches. Edneyville soils formed in residuum and have a C horizon of saprolite. Riverhead soils have a stratified sand and gravel substratum within a 20 to 40 inch depth. Satsop soils receive 60 to 80 inches of precipitation annually.

GEOGRAPHIC SETTING: Cheshire soils are nearly level through very steep and are on till plains and upland hills. Slope ranges from 0 through 60 percent. The soils formed in acid glacial till derived mostly from reddish sandstone, shale, and conglomerate with some basalt. Mean annual temperature ranges from 45 through 52 degrees F., mean annual precipitation ranges from 40 through 50 inches, and the growing season ranges from 130 through 185 days.

GEOGRAPHICALLY ASSOCIATED SOILS: These are the Berlin, Branford, Broadbrook, Ellington, Hartford, Holyoke, Ludlow, Manchester, Menlo, Penwood, Wapping, Watchaug, Wethersfield, Wilbraham, and Yalesville soils. The moderately well drained Watchaug soils are associated in a drainage sequence. Berlin soils are on lacustrine terraces. Branford, Ellington, Hartford, Manchester, and Penwood soils are on nearby outwash terraces and are underlain by stratified sand and gravel. Broadbrook, Ludlow, and Wethersfield soils have a dense substratum. Holyoke soils have bedrock within a 10 to 20 inch depth. Menlo and Wilbraham soils are very poorly drained and poorly drained, respectively. Wapping soils are moderately well drained and have 7.5YR or yellower hue in the B horizon.

DRAINAGE AND SATURATED HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY: Well drained. Surface runoff is medium to rapid. Saturated hydraulic conductivity is moderately high or high throughout.

USE AND VEGETATION: Many areas are cleared and used for cultivated crops, hay, or pasture. Some areas are used for vegetables, nursery stock, and other specialty crops. Scattered areas are used for community development. Stony areas are mostly wooded. Common trees are northern red, white, and black oak, hickory, ash, sugar maple, red maple, gray birch, eastern white pine, and eastern hemlock.

DISTRIBUTION AND EXTENT: Glaciated uplands of Connecticut, Massachusetts, and in southeastern New York. MLRAs 144A and 145. The series is of moderate extent.

MLRA SOIL SURVEY REGIONAL OFFICE (MO) RESPONSIBLE: Amherst, Massachusetts

SERIES ESTABLISHED: Hamden County, Massachusetts, 1928.

REMARKS: This revision reflects change in soil taxonomy to the 8th edition of the Keys and general updating. Cation exchange activity class placement based upon limited lab data and a review of similar and associated soils.

Diagnostic horizons and features recognized in this pedon are:
1. Ochric epipedon - the zone from 0 to 8 inches (Ap horizon).
2. Cambic horizon - the zone from 8 to 26 inches (Bw horizons).

National Cooperative Soil Survey
U.S.A.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#53551 May 28, 2013
There will be no exam.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#53552 May 28, 2013
I have no clue what the implications are for gardening - regarding fertility - except to note that the soils, since they are derived from crumbly sedimentary deposits, lack the large rocks ( farm potatoes) that we have here, and that historically the farming has been much better in your (CT river) valley than here.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#53553 May 28, 2013
FR

and by the way, I am assuming the soils were you live ARE the Cheshire Soil Series. They might not be. There are half a dozen related soils found in your area. I would need the address to narrow it down further, and then a field visit to confirm. And then I would send you a bill. lol.

Since: May 13

Location hidden

#53554 May 28, 2013
The dunce, who has a doctorate in science, is online posting garbage on soils (that he's copied from some website). ROFL. He doesn't even know the difference between valence and oxidation state; or the difference between mole and equivalent; or the difference among normality, molarity, molality and formality. Ask the dunce a simple question on the scientific principles involved or on the accompanying calculations based on the chemical equations/the chemical concepts and he'll flee the scene in embarrassment. He's not only a dunce but a fanatic and a biased jerk as well. Shameless creature. LOL.
Frijoles

Stamford, CT

#53555 May 28, 2013
JOEL THUMBS UP wrote:
The dunce, who has a doctorate in science, is online posting garbage on soils (that he's copied from some website). ROFL. He doesn't even know the difference between valence and oxidation state; or the difference between mole and equivalent; or the difference among normality, molarity, molality and formality. Ask the dunce a simple question on the scientific principles involved or on the accompanying calculations based on the chemical equations/the chemical concepts and he'll flee the scene in embarrassment. He's not only a dunce but a fanatic and a biased jerk as well. Shameless creature. LOL.
You are true genius to recognize that i copied from a website. Could it be THE LINK I published that propelled you to come to that confusion?

Be of use for a change.

Explain to us humble folk how much fertility of his soils would be due to quaternary events that fostered soil development (glaciation) and how much is a remnant of their tropical development 200 Million years ago.

Look at the changes in minerology composition (2:1 vs 1:1 clays) and relative weathering rates of these clays, and the impact of that on CEC to

Its a wide open question - i.e. I dont know the answer - With REAL WORLD implications

If the fertility is new then FR soils are just as good as mine. If the fertility is old, then his wife will have better cucumbers than me.
Voluntarist

United States

#53556 May 28, 2013
former res wrote:
<quoted text>
Cheshire.
Nice quiet town.(Home invasion of a few years back notwithstanding.)
We back up on some woods.
Only an hour from mom's now vs 2 1/2 when we lived in PA.
And a nice prison
Voluntarist

United States

#53557 May 28, 2013
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>
Where you live now you have bobcats, bears, and every few years a stray moose. Up on the ridges you have the last real habitat for Copperheads in CT (yes there are there - no I havent seen them).
You also have a rare salamander or newt that only lives on the ridges (I forget the name)
And now they have a new jackass running around.
former res

Cheshire, CT

#53558 May 28, 2013
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>
The hillbillies live in the Naugatuck valley (known locally as the "valley", but dont confuse that with the CT River (I91) valley where you live in (and dont confuse that with the fact that the CT river actually veers east and out of the I91 valley somewhere south of Hartford so the CT river valley in CT no longer has the CT river).
These days there a lot of people living in the "valley" that are transplants from Fairfield County who realized the good land deals and still commute my way.
But there are still natives around as well.
The "Valley" is basically Waterbury (or above?) down to Shelton. Stratford is technically in the valley but the people are different since it is coastal. No hillbillies but there are strange creatures in the forest in Stratford and Shelton called Melonheads.
Check out the valley towns. Seymour is known for their antiques and their casket factory.
You really know this state, inside and out.

Were you born here? I know you lived in AZ for time, college and post-college I believe.

Did you know Cheshire (aside from the prison) is known as "The Bedding Plant Capital"? True!

Melonheads? Tell me they don't play the banjo.
former res

Cheshire, CT

#53559 May 28, 2013
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>
I think that is true (the hotter and drier). I go up to Ridgefield a lot to work and the air seems hotter and more stagnant. Below RT 15, we have more coastal air patterns.
That makes sense.

I'm just glad it runs a bit cooler here than it did in PA.

We lived in "The Delaware Valley" which is Latin for "feels like a rain forest all summer."
former res

Cheshire, CT

#53560 May 28, 2013
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>
https://soilseries.sc.egov.usda.gov/OSD_Docs/...
CHESHIRE SOIL SERIES
The Cheshire series consists of very deep, well drained loamy soils formed in supraglacial till on uplands. They are nearly level through very steep soils on till plains and hills. Slope...
Interesting. Will share this info with the wife.

She's in charge of gardening/yard stuff (though I still cut the grass!).

You're hired!

ps..Did you know that CT basically abolished all county gov't I think around 40 years ago. Though still of geographical use (if not political). County gov't is still big in PA - courts, sheriffs office, taxes, RE records, carry permits! etc.

Since: May 13

Location hidden

#53561 May 28, 2013
(smiles, the dunce is livid).

Since: May 13

Location hidden

#53562 May 28, 2013
Xanadu, your neon lights will shine,

For you, Xanadu.....
former res

Cheshire, CT

#53563 May 28, 2013
JOEL THUMBS UP wrote:
Xanadu, your neon lights will shine,
For you, Xanadu.....
You sound to me about as smart at the average Jamaican.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#53564 May 28, 2013
former res wrote:
<quoted text>
Interesting. Will share this info with the wife.
She's in charge of gardening/yard stuff (though I still cut the grass!).
You're hired!
ps..Did you know that CT basically abolished all county gov't I think around 40 years ago. Though still of geographical use (if not political). County gov't is still big in PA - courts, sheriffs office, taxes, RE records, carry permits! etc.
GO over the border to Westchester if you want to see the horrors of county government. Their taxes are outrageous.(ATF take notice).

I posted the info tongue and cheek -its more detail than you need to know - and probably utterly incomprehensible to a layperson - but it is important info to know from my perspective. Its yet one more great service provided by our government!

The real question was what I posed to Joel.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#53565 May 28, 2013
former res wrote:
<quoted text>
You really know this state, inside and out.
Were you born here? I know you lived in AZ for time, college and post-college I believe.
Did you know Cheshire (aside from the prison) is known as "The Bedding Plant Capital"? True!
Melonheads? Tell me they don't play the banjo.
I dont know much about Cheshire other than the good rep of the schools, the red soils, and of course the grisly home invasion. I do know, that in Shelton or Derby, on the Housatonic River, there was a HUGE mattress factory fire only a few years ago. Spewed gallons of toxic latex foam insulation into the river and caused nasty air pollution.

http://www.eaglehose.com/latex_foam.htm

Melonheads are not human. They are monsters that live in the forest. Any teenager from the Trumbull, Shelton, and Stratford region knows about them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melon_heads#Lege...

Melon Heads is the name given to legendary beings and urban legends in parts of Michigan, Ohio, and Connecticut generally described as small humanoids with bulbous heads who occasionally emerge from hiding places to attack people. Different variations of the legend attribute different origins.

Several variations of the Melon Head myths can be found Fairfield County, Connecticut. Most instances can be found in Trumbull, Shelton, Stratford and Monroe, but other instances can be found in Seymour, Easton, Weston, Oxford, Milford, and Southbury. There are two primary Connecticut variations.[9]

According to the first variation of the myth, Fairfield County was the location of an asylum for the criminally insane that burned down in the fall of 1960, resulting in the death of all of the staff and most of the patients with 10-20 inmates unaccounted for, supposedly having survived and escaped to the woods. The legend states that the Melon Heads' appearance is the result of them having resorted to cannibalism in order to survive the harsh winters of the region, and due to inbreeding, which in turn caused them to develop hydrocephalus.

According to the second variation, the Melon Heads are descendants of a Colonial era family from Shelton-Trumbull who were banished after accusations of witchcraft were made against them causing them to retreat to the woods. As with the first legend, this variation attributes the appearance of the Melon Heads to inbreeding.[10] Melon Heads allegedly prey upon humans who wander into their territory.[11]

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#53566 May 28, 2013
former res wrote:
<quoted text>
You really know this state, inside and out.
Were you born here? I know you lived in AZ for time, college and post-college I believe.
.
I was born here in Fairfield County. I travel a lot with my work so I know the state kind of. But I really dont know the state. I never venture to the eastern portion except the shoreline, and the occasional trip to UCONN. I dont even go to the casinos.
former res

Cheshire, CT

#53567 May 28, 2013
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>
...If the fertility is new then FR soils are just as good as mine. If the fertility is old, then his wife will have better cucumbers than me.
Well now, if you're going to get into who has the better cucumber.

I automatically think of "Animal House."

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/an-n_RQJnYJmhbb...

Mine's bigger than that.
I beg your pardon?
My cucumber, it's bigger.
Vegetables can be really sensuous, don't you think?
No.
Vegetables are sensuaI.
People are sensuous.
Right. "Sensual. " That's what I meant.
Voluntarist

United States

#53568 May 28, 2013
#1 Back in 1980, the U.S. national debt was
less than one trillion dollars . Today, it is
rapidly approaching 17 trillion dollars...
#2 During Obama's first term, the federal
government accumulated more debt than it
did under the first 42 U.S presidents
combined .
#3 The U.S. national debt is now more than
23 times larger than it was when Jimmy
Carter became president.
#4 If you started paying off just the new debt
that the U.S. has accumulated during the
Obama administration at the rate of one dollar
per second, it would take more than 184,000
years to pay it off.
#5 The federal government is stealing more
than 100 million dollars from our children and
our grandchildren every single hour of every
single day.
#6 Back in 1970, the total amount of debt in
the United States (government debt +
business debt + consumer debt, etc.) was less
than 2 trillion dollars. Today it is over 56
trillion dollars...

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