Topix Chitown Regulars

“reign in blood”

Since: May 09

Braidwood, IL

#98498 May 4, 2014
My turn to serve communion. Gonna replace the wine with Fireball. Teehee
stacey

Philadelphia, PA

#98499 May 4, 2014
Where did these old posters go:

Lazy Pete
Screwy Bill
Butch Reed
Poopity Chuck
Josh Werblun
Prickly Pete

And when will you all stop listening to crap like Radionomy.com/aggrodriver81 ?
cheluzal

Plant City, FL

#98501 May 4, 2014
Mimi Seattle wrote:
<quoted text>
They are going to be sooooooo bad at their SATs and GREs...if they get that far.
<sigh>
Well, I struggle with multiplying....I do have to stop and think since math is my worst, but it can be done. I could make change if need be; it might take a few more seconds than you, but it could be done.

And didn't you hear--they keep lowering the standards on the SAT! The essay is not voluntary and all the hard words have been eliminated.*sigh*

“...,to wit”

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#98503 May 4, 2014
cheluzal wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, I struggle with multiplying....I do have to stop and think since math is my worst, but it can be done. I could make change if need be; it might take a few more seconds than you, but it could be done.
And didn't you hear--they keep lowering the standards on the SAT! The essay is not voluntary and all the hard words have been eliminated.*sigh*
I think there is a place for rote memorization especially in the grade schools. We can learn the process and the rationale as long as we are reasonably confident that they reach the right answer.

My girls are in their mid 20's now. One of the things the learned in grade school math was estimation as a means of double checking whether an answer fell into the correct range.. Essentially they were asked the question,"Does this answer "look" right to you?" But it was taught at the same time as the hard and fast math memorization.

I am not convinced it helped either of them very much other than pehaps learning to count the spaces from the decimal point to make sure you were in the right order of magnitude, but I was taught that long ago.

The value of memorizing things us easy to find.Do a random poll a whether people sing the alphabet song sub-verbally when alphabetizing papers. Ask who recites i before e except after c...., Every Good Boy Does Fine

Mnemonics are important and work because you have ... wait for it... memorized something.
Pippa

Hancock, NY

#98504 May 4, 2014
cheluzal wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, I struggle with multiplying....I do have to stop and think since math is my worst, but it can be done. I could make change if need be; it might take a few more seconds than you, but it could be done.
And didn't you hear--they keep lowering the standards on the SAT! The essay is not voluntary and all the hard words have been eliminated.*sigh*
One of my nephews had difficulty with math. My sister blamed it on one of his teachers who was a first year teacher and didn't know diddly about teaching. Other parents also complained. The teacher ended up selling real estate. I guess he was good enough at real estate math. But, when my nephew went to college, they tested him and said he had a learning disability in regard to math. The explanation was probably more detailed but that's the only part I heard from my sister. Anyway, despite this math disability, he's now a professor of Sociology at a great university and has authored numerous books on his subject. It would appear being supremely good a math is not necessarily a necessity for success in life. ;-) Just don't tell the kids.

“A Programmer is not in IT!”

Since: Feb 09

Neda, stay with me! Charlie

#98505 May 4, 2014
So you think you can read more into my sentences than is there? Wrong, you cant, but thanks for playing.
Zap Brannigan wrote:
So you think you can tell Chel whose posts she can respond to? You are as big a baby as Sub.
<quoted text>
cheluzal

Plant City, FL

#98506 May 4, 2014
Pippa wrote:
<quoted text>
One of my nephews had difficulty with math. My sister blamed it on one of his teachers who was a first year teacher and didn't know diddly about teaching. Other parents also complained. The teacher ended up selling real estate. I guess he was good enough at real estate math. But, when my nephew went to college, they tested him and said he had a learning disability in regard to math. The explanation was probably more detailed but that's the only part I heard from my sister. Anyway, despite this math disability, he's now a professor of Sociology at a great university and has authored numerous books on his subject. It would appear being supremely good a math is not necessarily a necessity for success in life. ;-) Just don't tell the kids.
A first year teacher is hard, and it looks like he had a disability anyway but they wanted to find a way to blame it 100% on the teacher. Sad. Glad it worked out for him.

“reign in blood”

Since: May 09

Braidwood, IL

#98508 May 5, 2014

“reign in blood”

Since: May 09

Braidwood, IL

#98509 May 5, 2014
Amy's out there somewhere

“reign in blood”

Since: May 09

Braidwood, IL

#98510 May 5, 2014
Pippa

Hancock, NY

#98511 May 5, 2014
cheluzal wrote:
<quoted text>
A first year teacher is hard, and it looks like he had a disability anyway but they wanted to find a way to blame it 100% on the teacher. Sad. Glad it worked out for him.
Oh, my nephew didn't blame the teacher so much as my sister. In her mind, her son was a genius. He had a measured IQ of 124 so he was a bright kid but not a genius by any means. He was an only child and my sister put too much on him at an early age. She felt he was better than any kid in the family and would say our 2 nephews who did have near genius/genius IQs (tested when they were very young) only did so because their psychiatrist dad had prepared/tutored them for the test. I figure those tests only measure so much and don't necessarily indicate future success or happiness (those 2 genius nephews prove my point). The first nephew I mentioned, A, just felt he didn't care much for math. But to be fair to my sister, the teacher did have a lot of complaints from parents. My older daughter was a straight A student in math - even in her accelerated program. But in 9th grade when she was doing the 10th grade math class, she was getting 98 and 99 on all her report card grades. I just figured she was continuing to do well and didn't question her about what she was learning. When she went to take the NYS Regents exam, she was shocked to see a huge number of questions on things they never covered in class. She said all over the room, kids were raising their hands or just yelling out that they never covered the material needed for huge sections of the test. My daughter told me that the teacher had skipped all around the book supposedly because she was doing things in the order of the state syllabus rather than as the book covered the material. In the process a large number of chapters were skipped entirely. When the kids asked the teacher about this, she told them the state no longer required that they cover that material in that particular course. Right - which is why they all did so well (poorly) on the regents exam. I asked math teachers from the other high schools where I subbed whether the regents that year was unusually difficult. They said they hadn't noticed it to be more difficult. It turned out my daughter's math teacher that year had been hired primarily for her so-called ability to teach some computer classes and only taught a couple of math classes. Since we have a small school population, this woman was the only one teaching that level math that year. She was not rehired for the next school year but the damage was done. I tutored my daughter that summer and she retook the regents and did very well. All she needed was to learn the stuff in the chapters her math teacher had skipped. The point in all this is that there are teachers who make huge mistakes that can have long term effects on the students. My daughter got a great grade the second time she took that regents but the damage was done. She has hated math ever since; she used to love it.

Since: Jun 09

Saint Petersburg, FL

#98513 May 5, 2014
ScarletandOlive wrote:
<quoted text>
IMO, spelling and grammar are always important. Ry's first grade class required that they write sentences every week. Parents were told not to make them correct misspellings, but to cross them out and write the correct spelling above it when they were done. Nope. They will not learn unless they are the ones making corrections. Ry has a children's dictionary and I would tell him "There is a misspelling in this sentence. Use your dictionary to figure it out and correct it."
I have high expectations for my kids and am angry that the school district is satisfied with them not failing.
I totally agree. My daughter likes the dictionary, too.

I thought it was a little over the top recently on one of my daughter's tests at school, though. She had to list the 66 books of the Bible by memory. There were ones in there I didn't remember even existed!!! She knew all of them, btu she only got an 88 because of spelling! I thought it was hard enough to remember Habbakuk (sp???) and Malachi, but to SPELL them right??? At least she got Ruth and Mark right, ha ha.

Since: Mar 09

Hollywood, FL

#98514 May 5, 2014
Stina2 wrote:
<quoted text>
I totally agree. My daughter likes the dictionary, too.
I thought it was a little over the top recently on one of my daughter's tests at school, though. She had to list the 66 books of the Bible by memory. There were ones in there I didn't remember even existed!!! She knew all of them, btu she only got an 88 because of spelling! I thought it was hard enough to remember Habbakuk (sp???) and Malachi, but to SPELL them right??? At least she got Ruth and Mark right, ha ha.
That's tough.

Maybe in the fall I'll suggest that our Bible study group do a study on short, obscure books of the Bible, just to help us remember that they're there.
:)

“Checks and Balances”

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#98515 May 5, 2014
Stina2 wrote:
<quoted text>I totally agree. My daughter likes the dictionary, too.

I thought it was a little over the top recently on one of my daughter's tests at school, though. She had to list the 66 books of the Bible by memory. There were ones in there I didn't remember even existed!!! She knew all of them, btu she only got an 88 because of spelling! I thought it was hard enough to remember Habbakuk (sp???) and Malachi, but to SPELL them right??? At least she got Ruth and Mark right, ha ha.
Yeah, that's expecting too much, IMO.

“Checks and Balances”

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#98516 May 5, 2014
Omg, I was hoping that this was an Onion article, but no... Some people's stupidity amazes me. http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/4873706/...

“The two baby belly, please!”

Since: Sep 09

Evanston IL

#98517 May 5, 2014
ScarletandOlive wrote:
Omg, I was hoping that this was an Onion article, but no... Some people's stupidity amazes me. http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/4873706/...
Good luck with living on the universe's plankton, but we have teeth for a reason.

“...,to wit”

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#98518 May 5, 2014
ScarletandOlive wrote:
Omg, I was hoping that this was an Onion article, but no... Some people's stupidity amazes me. http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/4873706/...
Eh, she won't last long.

However, what is the real reason Condy Rice chose not to speak at Rutgers? She can't be afraid of protesters after all this time.

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#98519 May 5, 2014
ScarletandOlive wrote:
Omg, I was hoping that this was an Onion article, but no... Some people's stupidity amazes me. http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/4873706/...
She looks alot like the big and hot Redhead on, Mad Men.....

“...,to wit”

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#98520 May 5, 2014
Pippa wrote:
<quoted text>
One of my nephews had difficulty with math. My sister blamed it on one of his teachers who was a first year teacher and didn't know diddly about teaching. Other parents also complained. The teacher ended up selling real estate. I guess he was good enough at real estate math. But, when my nephew went to college, they tested him and said he had a learning disability in regard to math. The explanation was probably more detailed but that's the only part I heard from my sister. Anyway, despite this math disability, he's now a professor of Sociology at a great university and has authored numerous books on his subject. It would appear being supremely good a math is not necessarily a necessity for success in life. ;-) Just don't tell the kids.
Pippa- I have a request.
When you are posting longer things can you break it up into paragraphs,please? I have trouble tracking "wall of text" stuff.
Thanks

Since: Jun 09

Saint Petersburg, FL

#98521 May 5, 2014
j_m_w wrote:
<quoted text>
That's tough.
Maybe in the fall I'll suggest that our Bible study group do a study on short, obscure books of the Bible, just to help us remember that they're there.
:)
My minister did Malachi not long ago. I think that's a good idea! But you should make sure everyone can spell them right!:-)

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