Topix Chitown Regulars

“bELieve”

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#76390 Nov 28, 2012
Toj wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes. Now, who in the Church limits it, I don't know but what I found on the website jives with what I've experienced and other people I know experienced. You are only allowed medication when you are dilated between 5 (I think) and 7 and they give you demerol. I experienced it first hand when I had my son by c-section after 30 hours of labor at a Catholic hospital. The only time I was not in extreme pain was as I was leaving and my doctor gave me a tylenol 3. I wouldn't know how closely all Catholic hospitals/doctors follow it in every hospital, however.
I wasn't allowed an epidural until I was almost fully dilated and I wasn't in a Catholic hospital. I know we are only going on anecdotes here, but from talking to the nurses, I was told that they don't like medicating pregnant women any more than they have to and the meds do wear off, so medicating too early is something they try to avoid in general.

Were you breast feeding after you gave birth? I know I'm getting a little personal here, but that would affect the meds that you were prescribed. They didn't give you any medication after your c-section? That is strange - my SIL had her son in a Catholic hospital - 24 hours in labor, which ended in a c-section after several hours of active labor. She received pain medication as soon as she woke up.

The biggest concern that my friends have experienced with the Catholic hospital around here is that they will not perform tubal ligations (understandably, since it goes against the Church's stance on birth control). I have a friend who has 4 children and had several miscarriages in between. She was told by her doctor during the last pregnancy that she had severe scarring from her c-sections and her life could be in jeopardy if she got pregnant again. She asked if she could have her tubes tied when the baby was delivered so that she did not have to schedule a separate surgery for that. The hospital would not allow it. I honestly don't remember how she resolved the issue, though I know that it is now resolved and she will not be having any more children unless they adopt (which they are planning on doing).

I understand that in some areas that would be a big issue. Where we live, there is a secular hospital 5 blocks down the street from that Catholic hospital. Both are excellent hospitals, too.

“bELieve”

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#76391 Nov 28, 2012
RedheadwGlasses wrote:
50 most awkward pregnancy phots:
http://worldwideinterweb.com/photos/item/1733... {%2210151196079043089%22%3A178 863718912457}&action_type_ map={%2210151196079043089%22%3 A%22og.likes%22}&action_re f_map
I'd say they're safe for work.
I've seen some of those before, but they are all just WRONG, on so many levels.

That last pic looks photoshopped, though.

Since: Mar 09

Miami, FL

#76392 Nov 28, 2012
RedheadwGlasses wrote:
<quoted text>
I wonder where tonka and cycle are!
I know, I miss them. Especially after the Florida-FSU game last weekend.
;)

Toj

“Where is Everyone?”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#76393 Nov 28, 2012
Jess in NJ wrote:
<quoted text>
I wasn't allowed an epidural until I was almost fully dilated and I wasn't in a Catholic hospital. I know we are only going on anecdotes here, but from talking to the nurses, I was told that they don't like medicating pregnant women any more than they have to and the meds do wear off, so medicating too early is something they try to avoid in general.
Were you breast feeding after you gave birth? I know I'm getting a little personal here, but that would affect the meds that you were prescribed. They didn't give you any medication after your c-section? That is strange - my SIL had her son in a Catholic hospital - 24 hours in labor, which ended in a c-section after several hours of active labor. She received pain medication as soon as she woke up.
The biggest concern that my friends have experienced with the Catholic hospital around here is that they will not perform tubal ligations (understandably, since it goes against the Church's stance on birth control). I have a friend who has 4 children and had several miscarriages in between. She was told by her doctor during the last pregnancy that she had severe scarring from her c-sections and her life could be in jeopardy if she got pregnant again. She asked if she could have her tubes tied when the baby was delivered so that she did not have to schedule a separate surgery for that. The hospital would not allow it. I honestly don't remember how she resolved the issue, though I know that it is now resolved and she will not be having any more children unless they adopt (which they are planning on doing).
I understand that in some areas that would be a big issue. Where we live, there is a secular hospital 5 blocks down the street from that Catholic hospital. Both are excellent hospitals, too.
No, wasn't planning to breastfeed (and didn't) b/c of the c-section.

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#76394 Nov 28, 2012
Jess in NJ wrote:
<quoted text>
I've seen some of those before, but they are all just WRONG, on so many levels.
That last pic looks photoshopped, though.
One a few spots above that, with the husband holding the wife's belly and the dog's nose right there? WEird.

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#76395 Nov 28, 2012
I know the Catholic hospital from my hometown would do a tubal ligation only after woman had had two C sections, and even then, she had to go home from the hospital after the C section, then later schedule the tubal ligation, which then had to be reviewed by the hospital’s ethics panel before being approved. Back then, C sections were a huge vertical cut through your entire abdominal wall, from belly button to pubis. BF’s mom ended up having five C sections (four boys, then finally the girl came along) then getting her tubes tied. She was a tiny woman, but the belly bloop was pretty extreme, after having had five C sections.

Since: Mar 09

Miami, FL

#76396 Nov 28, 2012
Isn't anyone going to grab the girls? I did it yesterday so... one, two, three, NOT IT!
;)

Since: Mar 09

Miami, FL

#76397 Nov 28, 2012
The picture of the Asian couple was pretty okay, because in spite of the exposed belly, there wasn't anything else exposed, no animals, and no weird props in the picture.

But for the most part: YIKES.

“The two baby belly, please!”

Since: Sep 09

Evanston IL

#76398 Nov 28, 2012

Since: Mar 09

Miami, FL

#76399 Nov 28, 2012
squishymama wrote:
Thanks, squish!
:)

“reign in blood”

Since: May 09

Wilmington, IL

#76400 Nov 28, 2012
I got Amy, losers

http://www.topix.com/forum/chicago/T2N52JAH4E...

What day is it, even?

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#76401 Nov 28, 2012
j_m_w wrote:
The picture of the Asian couple was pretty okay, because in spite of the exposed belly, there wasn't anything else exposed, no animals, and no weird props in the picture.
But for the most part: YIKES.
Yeah, I thought myself that one was out of place in that group.

Toj

“Where is Everyone?”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#76402 Nov 28, 2012
Hmmm -- another shooting in Florida.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/11/28/us/florida-musi...

Discuss!

I think he should be prosecuted and hopefully found guilty.

“It made sense at the time....”

Since: May 09

Schaumburg, IL

#76403 Nov 28, 2012
Toj wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes. Now, who in the Church limits it, I don't know but what I found on the website jives with what I've experienced and other people I know experienced. You are only allowed medication when you are dilated between 5 (I think) and 7 and they give you demerol. I experienced it first hand when I had my son by c-section after 30 hours of labor at a Catholic hospital. The only time I was not in extreme pain was as I was leaving and my doctor gave me a tylenol 3. I wouldn't know how closely all Catholic hospitals/doctors follow it in every hospital, however.
i have a friend who has had multiple surgeries in a catholic hosptital, and the times i've visited her, she has a morphine pump and nurses asking her about narcotic pills to help her sleep. another friend had a surgery at a different catholic hospital (different system, even) and also had a morphine pump.

again, not to get too personal, but if child birth is the only procedure you've had at a catholic hospital, i wonder (from my childless vantage point over here) if there is something to the child birth procedures instead that "regulate" how much pain medication and when it can be administered.

i just searched the USCCB (united states conference of catholic bishops) website and found several things on pain medication as part of palliative care and assisted suicide. They aren't against pain medication for palliative treatment (treating the pain), but basically warn against going too far with it to the point that it surpresses "normal" processes to the point that a patient dies.

http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/human-...

This is a topic htat has been on my mind as my grandmother's cancer progresses, so it's a little more personally interesting to me at this point in time. It's not my intention to come across too snarky or "preachy"...

Toj

“Where is Everyone?”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#76404 Nov 28, 2012
Aisle Sitter wrote:
<quoted text>
i have a friend who has had multiple surgeries in a catholic hosptital, and the times i've visited her, she has a morphine pump and nurses asking her about narcotic pills to help her sleep. another friend had a surgery at a different catholic hospital (different system, even) and also had a morphine pump.
again, not to get too personal, but if child birth is the only procedure you've had at a catholic hospital, i wonder (from my childless vantage point over here) if there is something to the child birth procedures instead that "regulate" how much pain medication and when it can be administered.
i just searched the USCCB (united states conference of catholic bishops) website and found several things on pain medication as part of palliative care and assisted suicide. They aren't against pain medication for palliative treatment (treating the pain), but basically warn against going too far with it to the point that it surpresses "normal" processes to the point that a patient dies.
http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/human-...
This is a topic htat has been on my mind as my grandmother's cancer progresses, so it's a little more personally interesting to me at this point in time. It's not my intention to come across too snarky or "preachy"...
You're not. I was specific that it was my experience and people I know who experience this. I think it might be "some" hospitals.

As for cancer, end of life, etc.-- it is not unusual that at the last stage they are given a lot of morphhine. It's actually a kindness. If you have three days to live and are in extreme pain, really are you NOT going to give as much pain medication as the patient wants/needs? You're going to prolong a life another day by having them in pain? Doctors know this and the good ones ride that line very well.

Toj

“Where is Everyone?”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#76405 Nov 28, 2012
And Aisle Sitter -- I'm sorry you're going through that.

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#76406 Nov 28, 2012
On Thanksgiving, a man in rural/small town Minnesota shot and killed two teenagers who broke into his home to rob him. He’d had problems with thefts before (including $10K in money, guns, and other stuff being stolen in October).(He’s a retired U.S. State Department security guard.)

He expected to be robbed, so he made it look like he wasn’t home. Sat in his basement with loaded guns on his lap. He heard a window break upstairs. He waited until he saw feet coming down his basemetn steps. Then he saw the legs, then the hips, then he shot. The 17yo boy fell down the rest of the stairs, and the guy shot the kid in the face at point-blank range.

He put the body on a tarp and dragged it back to a workshop.

He heard someone else upstairs, so he waited. Same thing – once he saw the hips, he shot. She fell down the steps. His gun jammed, so he got his .22 (which doesn’t do much damage, really, relatively speaking) and shot her several times in the chest. He put her on a tarp and dragged her back to his workshop. She was gurgling and struggling to breathe, so he put a handgun under her chin and blew her brains out.

The next day, he called a neighbor to help find himself a lawyer. The neighbor called the cops.

Now it turns out the kids (cousins) had robbed someone else the day/night before – including breaking a sliding glass door to get in (which is very expensive).

So the guy who killed them is being charged with 2nd degree murder (as he should be – he had no legal right to kill them “in self defense” once they were incapacitated). No reasonable person is saying he had no right to shoot them when he saw them come down his basement stairs. But he should have called 911 as soon as he heard the window break upstairs.

The man they robbed the day before agrees that the killer crossed a line, but he added,“Of course, if they weren’t breaking into people’s homes to rob them, they’d still be alive.”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#76407 Nov 28, 2012
Aisle Sitter wrote:
i just searched the USCCB (united states conference of catholic bishops) website and found several things on pain medication as part of palliative care and assisted suicide. They aren't against pain medication for palliative treatment (treating the pain), but basically warn against going too far with it to the point that it surpresses "normal" processes to the point that a patient dies.
http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/human-...
This is a topic htat has been on my mind as my grandmother's cancer progresses, so it's a little more personally interesting to me at this point in time. It's not my intention to come across too snarky or "preachy"...
It's very common that with hospice care, the pain meds get increased to a degree where they effect heart rate and breathing, and that leads to their death.

But big deal -- it leads to their death two days before it otherwise would have happened. At that point, pain management, to me, is more important than dragging another day or two of life out of a person.

Toj

“Where is Everyone?”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#76408 Nov 28, 2012
RedheadwGlasses wrote:
On Thanksgiving, a man in rural/small town Minnesota shot and killed two teenagers who broke into his home to rob him. He’d had problems with thefts before (including $10K in money, guns, and other stuff being stolen in October).(He’s a retired U.S. State Department security guard.)
He expected to be robbed, so he made it look like he wasn’t home. Sat in his basement with loaded guns on his lap. He heard a window break upstairs. He waited until he saw feet coming down his basemetn steps. Then he saw the legs, then the hips, then he shot. The 17yo boy fell down the rest of the stairs, and the guy shot the kid in the face at point-blank range.
He put the body on a tarp and dragged it back to a workshop.
He heard someone else upstairs, so he waited. Same thing – once he saw the hips, he shot. She fell down the steps. His gun jammed, so he got his .22 (which doesn’t do much damage, really, relatively speaking) and shot her several times in the chest. He put her on a tarp and dragged her back to his workshop. She was gurgling and struggling to breathe, so he put a handgun under her chin and blew her brains out.
The next day, he called a neighbor to help find himself a lawyer. The neighbor called the cops.
Now it turns out the kids (cousins) had robbed someone else the day/night before – including breaking a sliding glass door to get in (which is very expensive).
So the guy who killed them is being charged with 2nd degree murder (as he should be – he had no legal right to kill them “in self defense” once they were incapacitated). No reasonable person is saying he had no right to shoot them when he saw them come down his basement stairs. But he should have called 911 as soon as he heard the window break upstairs.
The man they robbed the day before agrees that the killer crossed a line, but he added,“Of course, if they weren’t breaking into people’s homes to rob them, they’d still be alive.”
That's someone who is hunting people. He should be shot in the groin and put in a cell and left to bleed.

Since when do you do a horrific thing in order to right a wrong?
Sam I Am

Knoxville, TN

#76409 Nov 28, 2012
RedheadwGlasses wrote:
On Thanksgiving, a man in rural/small town Minnesota shot and killed two teenagers who broke into his home to rob him. He’d had problems with thefts before (including $10K in money, guns, and other stuff being stolen in October).(He’s a retired U.S. State Department security guard.)
He expected to be robbed, so he made it look like he wasn’t home. Sat in his basement with loaded guns on his lap. He heard a window break upstairs. He waited until he saw feet coming down his basemetn steps. Then he saw the legs, then the hips, then he shot. The 17yo boy fell down the rest of the stairs, and the guy shot the kid in the face at point-blank range.
He put the body on a tarp and dragged it back to a workshop.
He heard someone else upstairs, so he waited. Same thing – once he saw the hips, he shot. She fell down the steps. His gun jammed, so he got his .22 (which doesn’t do much damage, really, relatively speaking) and shot her several times in the chest. He put her on a tarp and dragged her back to his workshop. She was gurgling and struggling to breathe, so he put a handgun under her chin and blew her brains out.
The next day, he called a neighbor to help find himself a lawyer. The neighbor called the cops.
Now it turns out the kids (cousins) had robbed someone else the day/night before – including breaking a sliding glass door to get in (which is very expensive).
So the guy who killed them is being charged with 2nd degree murder (as he should be – he had no legal right to kill them “in self defense” once they were incapacitated). No reasonable person is saying he had no right to shoot them when he saw them come down his basement stairs. But he should have called 911 as soon as he heard the window break upstairs.
The man they robbed the day before agrees that the killer crossed a line, but he added,“Of course, if they weren’t breaking into people’s homes to rob them, they’d still be alive.”
He's a hundred times worse than the robbers and so is any a-hole who would defend him. He laid in wait to kill them. All he had to do was show the gun and tell them to get the heck out. Stealing a guy's TV does not warrant a death sentence.

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