Barack Obama, our next President

Barack Obama, our next President

There are 1460232 comments on the Hampton Roads Daily Press story from Nov 5, 2008, titled Barack Obama, our next President. In it, Hampton Roads Daily Press reports that:

"The road ahead will be long. Our climb will be steep," Obama cautioned. Young and charismatic but with little experience on the national level, Obama smashed through racial barriers and easily defeated ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Hampton Roads Daily Press.

Obama is a joke

Emmaus, PA

#1033488 Dec 2, 2013
shinningelectr0n wrote:
<quoted text>
The Magic Negro gave Putin a job.
A BJ.
He gave Michelle's friend a job too, making a working wed site, we all see how well that worked out.
sonicfilter

Fishers, IN

#1033489 Dec 2, 2013
House Republicans Have 'No Plans' To Shut Down The Government Over Obamacare Again

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/02/obam...

when you're more unpopular than the program you're trying to shut down....'No Plans'.

“Constitutionalis t”

Since: Dec 10

Spring, TX

#1033490 Dec 2, 2013
The Democrats spend almost a billion dollars, and they can't get a site to work that two college students created in their spare time. At the same time, the government has no problem spending 80 million dollars to record every text message, post, internet search, and email for every non-muslim person in the country.

Since: Aug 13

Bozeman, MT

#1033491 Dec 2, 2013
I see that fast-food workers in about 100 cities will walk off the job this later this week. They're hoping this action will influence their employers to agree to higher pay.

Too bad they don't they realize that Obamacare will eventually result in their jobs disappearing as fast-food joints are deemed bad for our health.
sonicfilter

Fishers, IN

#1033492 Dec 2, 2013
RNC Tries to Cover Tracks Over Tweet Saying Racism has Ended

http://www.politicususa.com/2013/12/02/republ...

much too funny for anyone to forget.

Since: Jun 13

Orlando, FL

#1033493 Dec 2, 2013
John Galt wrote:
<quoted text>
easy...get the government out of medical care...
I'm in. Wish there were someone we could call. Other than conservative politicians. It's the ones on Capital Hill who won't listen to the voice of the people who are the problem.
WOW

New York, NY

#1033494 Dec 2, 2013
Media attacks Obama's 'Soviet-style' publicity policy
Barack Obama's White House has been accused of producing Soviet-style propaganda by press photographers who are furious at being denied access to the US president.

Mr Obama's aides routinely block independent photographers from capturing him at work, before distributing flattering pictures shot by Pete Souza, his official photographer.

During a tense meeting at the White House, the practice was described by Doug Mills, a veteran photographer for The New York Times, as “just like TASS,” the Soviet Union state news agency.

More than 30 major US media organisations and the leading US press photographers' union have protested against being barred from covering Mr Obama in an open letter to his press secretary.

“Journalists are routinely being denied the right to photograph or videotape the president while he is performing his official duties,” said the letter, which was delivered to Jay Carney. As surely as if they were placing a hand over a journalist’s camera lens, officials in this administration are blocking the public from having an independent view of important functions of the executive branch of government.”

Aides to Mr Obama stress that US administrations and the press corps have been arguing about access to the commander-in-chief for several decades.

However, they have been accused of shutting out journalists more frequently than ever before. On the very first day of Mr Obama's presidency, he retook the oath of office behind closed doors after stumbling over his words during his inauguration ceremony.

And his White House has taken advantage of social media such as Twitter, Facebook and Flickr, to publish an unprecedented number of officially-approved pictures. The protest letter from media groups accused them of “replacing independent photojournalism with visual press releases.”

Outlets such as USA Today and McClatchy newspapers have announced they will not publish the “hand-out” photographs distributed by the White House.

Editors said the policy would remain in place except for “very extraordinary circumstances” involving national security, such as when Mr Obama and senior colleagues were photographed in the White House situation room during the operation that killed Osama bin Laden in 2011.

Mr Carney said in a statement that Mr Obama's press officials were “working to address some of the concerns raised”.

“We certainly do not believe that official photos released by the White House are a substitute for the work of independent journalists,” he said.

HE LIED ABOUT BEING HONEST AND TRANSPARENT

“Constitutionalis t”

Since: Dec 10

Spring, TX

#1033495 Dec 2, 2013
WOW wrote:
<quoted text>Its funny they never correct your grammer oh its only for folks with a different point of view
Content:

Its funny they never correct your grammer (period)(upper case)oh (exclamation point)(upper case)its only for folks with a different point of view (period)

“fairtax.org”

Since: Dec 08

gauley bridge wv

#1033496 Dec 2, 2013
LoisLane59 wrote:
<quoted text>Enough cheap rugs to cover an oversized living room floor.
(Sorry, flack, if I overstepped my boundaries a few days ago. Or if I made you mad.)
You did neither. No need for an apology. Have a good bird day? Spent the last 4 days with my dad. He is 92. He is giving up. Something I never thought possible.

Since: Jun 13

Orlando, FL

#1033497 Dec 2, 2013
LCNLin wrote:
<quoted text>
What is the Republican alternative for health care for Americans?
The Democrats don't want to listen to them. For the past five years. And neither do you apparently.

Since: Aug 13

Bozeman, MT

#1033498 Dec 2, 2013
So, You Want Government Health Care? Look What They Did To Education

With Obama's recent proposals to expand early education opportunities, anyone interested in the facts has to look at the Federal Government's track record when it comes to schools. It's no coincidence that as the Federal government continues to expand its role in the education of America's children, more and more people are becoming concerned over the falling educational standards in our country. This begs the question: does increased government spending or involvement in education lead to better results for our students?

No, it doesn't.

The chart below shows that while Federal spending per student has increased almost 200% since 1970, the reading, writing, and mathematical abilities of our students has stagnated. Government apologists can't even blame a lack of local spending on the failure of public schools. Since 1970, local spending has increased almost 150% per student.

So what did we get for all that money? A lot more staff. Since 1970, the amount of public school employees has increased 70%.

http://simplefactsplainarguments.blogspot.com...
WOW

New York, NY

#1033499 Dec 2, 2013
leosnana wrote:
<quoted text>He had a typo--et for get--why do you morons dispute G-R-A-M-M-A-R when you don't even know how to spell it, let alone what it constitutes?(BTW, it should be it's not its.)
DUMB9itch did you read anything American dead last in Education and this is done specifically by design. Part of a agenda. Video just published:
http://www.youtube.com/watch ...
so what are you doing in the BLACK COMMUNITY TO HELP BLACK CHILDREN GRADUATE

Since: Jun 13

Orlando, FL

#1033500 Dec 2, 2013
flack wrote:
<quoted text> You did neither. No need for an apology. Have a good bird day? Spent the last 4 days with my dad. He is 92. He is giving up. Something I never thought possible.
Had a very nice Thanksgiving, thanks. Sorry to hear about your dad. If this helps in any way, 92 is a ripe old age and sometimes it's harder to hang on at that age. It's not easy to let go of a loved one at any age, so I understand what you're going through.

“fairtax.org”

Since: Dec 08

gauley bridge wv

#1033501 Dec 2, 2013
Ray Donovan wrote:
I see that fast-food workers in about 100 cities will walk off the job this later this week. They're hoping this action will influence their employers to agree to higher pay.
Too bad they don't they realize that Obamacare will eventually result in their jobs disappearing as fast-food joints are deemed bad for our health.
They will just cause a quicker move to automation.
The Long-Distance Journey of a Fast-Food Order
By MATT RICHTEL
Published: April 11, 2006
SANTA MARIA, Calif.— Like many American teenagers, Julissa Vargas, 17, has a minimum-wage job in the fast-food industry — but hers has an unusual geographic reach.
Ana Elisa Fuentes for The New York Times
Signs at a McDonald's call center offer reminders to order-takers.
Ana Elisa Fuentes for The New York Times
Carmen Sanchez, Julissa Vargas and Elizabeth Gonzalez, left to right, work at a call center in California that fields orders from as far away as Hawaii. They must be polite while urging customers to buy more food.
"Would you like your Coke and orange juice medium or large?" Ms. Vargas said into her headset to an unseen woman who was ordering breakfast from a drive-through line. She did not neglect the small details —"You Must Ask for Condiments," a sign next to her computer terminal instructs — and wished the woman a wonderful day.
What made the $12.08 transaction remarkable was that the customer was not just outside Ms. Vargas's workplace here on California's central coast. She was at a McDonald's in Honolulu. And within a two-minute span Ms. Vargas had also taken orders from drive-through windows in Gulfport, Miss., and Gillette, Wyo.
Ms. Vargas works not in a restaurant but in a busy call center in this town, 150 miles from Los Angeles. She and as many as 35 others take orders remotely from 40 McDonald's outlets around the country. The orders are then sent back to the restaurants by Internet, to be filled a few yards from where they were placed.
The people behind this setup expect it to save just a few seconds on each order. But that can add up to extra sales over the course of a busy day at the drive-through.
While the call-center idea has received some attention since a scattered sampling of McDonald's franchises began testing it 18 months ago, most customers are still in the dark. For Meredith Mejia, a regular at a McDonald's in Pleasant Hill, Calif., near San Francisco, it meant that her lunch came with a small helping of the surreal. When told that she had just ordered her double cheeseburger and small fries from a call center 250 miles away, she said the concept was "bizarre."
And the order-taking is not always seamless. Often customers' voices are faint, forcing the workers to ask for things to be repeated. During recent rainstorms in Hawaii, it was particularly hard to hear orders from there over the din.
Ms. Vargas seems unfazed by her job, even though it involves being subjected to constant electronic scrutiny. Software tracks her productivity and speed, and every so often a red box pops up on her screen to test whether she is paying attention. She is expected to click on it within 1.75 seconds. In the break room, a computer screen lets employees know just how many minutes have elapsed since they left their workstations.
The pay may be the same, but this is a long way from flipping burgers.
"Their job is to be fast on the mouse — that's their job," said Douglas King, chief executive of Bronco Communications, which operates the call center.
The center in Santa Maria has been in operation for 18 months; a print-out tacked to a wall declares, "Over 2,540,000 served." McDonald's says it is still experimental, but it puts an unusual twist on an idea that is gaining traction: taking advantage of ever-cheaper communications technology, companies are creating centralized staffs of specially trained order-takers, even for situations where old-fashioned physical proximity has been the norm.

“fairtax.org”

Since: Dec 08

gauley bridge wv

#1033502 Dec 2, 2013
The goals of such centers are not just to cut labor costs but also to provide more focused customer service — improving the level of personal attention by sending Happy Meal orders on a thousand-mile round trip.
"It's really centralizing the function of not only taking the order but advising the customer on getting more out of the product, which can sell more — at least in theory," said Joseph Fleischer, chief technical editor for Call Center Magazine, an industry trade publication.
McDonald's is joined by the owner of Hardee's and Carl's Jr., CKE Restaurants, which plans to deploy a similar system later this year in restaurants in California.
Not everyone is sold on the idea. Denny Lynch, a spokesman for Wendy's Restaurants, said that the approach had not yet proved itself to be cost-effective. "Speed is incredibly important," he said, but "we haven't given this solution any serious thought."
Mr. Lynch said that Wendy's would need concrete evidence that call centers worked. For example, could remote order-takers increase sales by asking customers to order dessert?
Then there is the question of whether combining burgers, shakes and cyberspace is an example of the drive for efficiency run amok — introducing a mouse where the essential technology is a spatula.
"This is a case of 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it,' " said Sherri Daye Scott, editor of QSR Magazine, a trade journal covering fast-food outlets, which refer to themselves as quick-service restaurants.
But the backers of the technology are looking to expand into new industries. The operator of one of the McDonald's centers is developing a related system that would allow big stores like Home Depot to equip carts with speakers that customers could use to contact a call center wirelessly for shopping advice.
Jon Anton, a founder of Bronco, says that the goal is "saving seconds to make millions," because more efficient service can lead to more sales and lower labor costs. With a wireless system in a Home Depot, for example, a call-center operator might tell a customer, "You're at Aisle D6. Let me walk you over to where you can find the 16-penny nails," Mr. Anton said.
Efficiency is certainly the mantra at the Bronco call center, which has grown from 15 workers six months ago to 125 today. Its workers are experts in the McDonald's menu; they are trained to be polite, to urge customers to add items to their order and, above all, to be fast. Each worker takes up to 95 orders an hour during peak times.
Customers pulling up to the drive-through menu are connected to the computer of a call-center employee using Internet calling technology. The first thing the McDonald's customer hears is a prerecorded greeting in the voice of the employee. The order-takers' screens include the menu and an indication of the whether it is time for breakfast or lunch at the local restaurant. A "notes" section shows if that restaurant has called in to say that it is out of a particular item.
When the customer pulls away from the menu to pay for the food and pick it up, it takes around 10 seconds for another car to pull forward. During that time, Mr. King said, his order-takers can be answering a call from a different McDonald's where someone has already pulled up.
The remote order-takers at Bronco earn the minimum wage ($6.75 an hour in California), do not get health benefits and do not wear uniforms. Ms. Vargas, who recently finished high school, wore jeans and a baggy white sweatshirt as she took orders last week.
The call-center system allows employees to be monitored and tracked much more closely than would be possible if they were in restaurants. Mr. King's computer screen gives him constant updates as to which workers are not meeting standards. "You've got to measure everything," he said. "When fractions of seconds count, the environment needs to be controlled."

“fairtax.org”

Since: Dec 08

gauley bridge wv

#1033503 Dec 2, 2013
The Long-Distance Journey of a Fast-Food Order
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By MATT RICHTEL
Published: April 11, 2006
SANTA MARIA, Calif.— Like many American teenagers, Julissa Vargas, 17, has a minimum-wage job in the fast-food industry — but hers has an unusual geographic reach.

Ana Elisa Fuentes for The New York Times
Signs at a McDonald's call center offer reminders to order-takers.

Ana Elisa Fuentes for The New York Times
Carmen Sanchez, Julissa Vargas and Elizabeth Gonzalez, left to right, work at a call center in California that fields orders from as far away as Hawaii. They must be polite while urging customers to buy more food.
"Would you like your Coke and orange juice medium or large?" Ms. Vargas said into her headset to an unseen woman who was ordering breakfast from a drive-through line. She did not neglect the small details —"You Must Ask for Condiments," a sign next to her computer terminal instructs — and wished the woman a wonderful day.

What made the $12.08 transaction remarkable was that the customer was not just outside Ms. Vargas's workplace here on California's central coast. She was at a McDonald's in Honolulu. And within a two-minute span Ms. Vargas had also taken orders from drive-through windows in Gulfport, Miss., and Gillette, Wyo.

Ms. Vargas works not in a restaurant but in a busy call center in this town, 150 miles from Los Angeles. She and as many as 35 others take orders remotely from 40 McDonald's outlets around the country. The orders are then sent back to the restaurants by Internet, to be filled a few yards from where they were placed.

The people behind this setup expect it to save just a few seconds on each order. But that can add up to extra sales over the course of a busy day at the drive-through.

While the call-center idea has received some attention since a scattered sampling of McDonald's franchises began testing it 18 months ago, most customers are still in the dark. For Meredith Mejia, a regular at a McDonald's in Pleasant Hill, Calif., near San Francisco, it meant that her lunch came with a small helping of the surreal. When told that she had just ordered her double cheeseburger and small fries from a call center 250 miles away, she said the concept was "bizarre."

And the order-taking is not always seamless. Often customers' voices are faint, forcing the workers to ask for things to be repeated. During recent rainstorms in Hawaii, it was particularly hard to hear orders from there over the din.

Ms. Vargas seems unfazed by her job, even though it involves being subjected to constant electronic scrutiny. Software tracks her productivity and speed, and every so often a red box pops up on her screen to test whether she is paying attention. She is expected to click on it within 1.75 seconds. In the break room, a computer screen lets employees know just how many minutes have elapsed since they left their workstations.

The pay may be the same, but this is a long way from flipping burgers.

"Their job is to be fast on the mouse — that's their job," said Douglas King, chief executive of Bronco Communications, which operates the call center.

The center in Santa Maria has been in operation for 18 months; a print-out tacked to a wall declares, "Over 2,540,000 served." McDonald's says it is still experimental, but it puts an unusual twist on an idea that is gaining traction: taking advantage of ever-cheaper communications technology, companies are creating centralized staffs of specially trained order-takers, even for situations where old-fashioned physical proximity has been the norm.
WOW

New York, NY

#1033504 Dec 2, 2013
The legendary singer/songwriter is now facing a lawsuit filed by the Council of Croats in France (CRICCF) in relation to an interview he gave to French Rolling Stone in 2012.

Dylan, who was one of the public faces of the civil rights movement in the US during the 1960s, made the comments when asked how much he felt America had progressed since the Civil War in the 19th century.

“This country is just too f***** up about colour. It's a distraction. People at each others' throats just because they are of a different colour. It's the height of insanity, and it will hold any nation back - or any neighbourhood back. Or any anything back,” Dylan said.

“Blacks know that some whites didn't want to give up slavery - that if they had their way, they would still be under the yoke, and they can't pretend they don't know that. If you got a slave master or Klan in your blood, blacks can sense that. That stuff lingers to this day. Just like Jews can sense Nazi blood and the Serbs can sense Croatian blood.”

AAAAAAAhhhhhh good old fashon BIGOTRY from who a LIBERAL with a BLACK BABY hahahahahahahahahahahaha they think JUST BECAUSE THEY HAVE SEX WITH BLACK WOMEN THEY ARE NOT BIGOTS hahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha hahlololololoolololoolo THE SLAVE MASTERS HAD SEX WITH BLACK WOMEN ALL DAY everyday were they BIGOTS hahahahahahah DIBLASIO got a BLACK WIFE SO Fing WHAT men beat their meat,have sex with Donkeys, sheep,humans will do anything to get off doesnt mean they have BETTER morals lololololololo
forks_make_us_fa t

Norman, OK

#1033505 Dec 2, 2013
Drum roll...

Progressives promise poor people new cars...

"AIR AGENCY PUSHING NEW-CAR PLAN FOR POOR"

"The California Air Resources Board is now embarking on a program that would help poor people buy energy-efficient vehicles. In one scenario posed by the agency, a “voucher” might even pay the full price for a Nissan Leaf, an electric car with an MSRP above $21,000, or for used cars with lower price tags."

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2013/dec/01/tp...

“fairtax.org”

Since: Dec 08

gauley bridge wv

#1033506 Dec 2, 2013
Speed and sales volume are not the only factors driving remote order-taking. CKE Restaurants, for instance, wants to improve customer service. It plans to start taking remote orders in September at five Carl's Jr.'s restaurants in California, with a broader deployment after that.

CKE said its workers were strained doing numerous tasks at once — taking orders, helping to fill them, accepting cash and keeping the restaurants clean.

Accuracy problems at the drive-through "are a result of the fact that the people working them are multitasking to the point they forget details," said Jeff Chasney, head of technology operations for CKE.

Mr. Chasney said the new system could help lower barriers in language and communication. Often, in California in particular, he said, the employee may primarily speak Spanish, while the customer speaks only English — a problem that can be eliminated with a specialized call-center crew.

"We believe we raise the customer-service bar by having people who are very articulate, have a good command of the English language, and some who are bilingual," he said.

Some 50 McDonald's franchises are testing remote order-taking, some using Bronco Communications. Others are using Verety, a company based in Oak Brook, Ill.(also the home of McDonald's), that has taken the concept further by contracting workers in rural North Dakota to take drive-through orders from their homes.

A spokesman for McDonald's, Bill Whitman, said that the results of the test runs had been positive so far, but that it had not yet decided whether to expand its use of the technology.

The system does sometimes lead to mix-ups and customer confusion. The surprised customer will say to the cashier, "You didn't take my order," said Bertha Aleman, manager of the McDonald's in Pleasant Hill. For the last seven months the franchise has used the Bronco system to help manage its two drive-through lanes at lunch.

Ms. Aleman said that, over all, the system had improved accuracy and helped her cut costs. She said that now she did not need an employee dedicated to taking orders or, during the lunch rush, an assistant for the order-taker to handle cash when things backed up. "We've cut labor," she said.

The call-center workers do have some advantages over their on-the-scene counterparts. Ms. Vargas said it was strange to be so far from the actual food. But after work, she said, "I don't smell like hamburgers."
forks_make_us_fa t

Norman, OK

#1033507 Dec 2, 2013
on the 'nuculur' option and Democrats...

"In 2005 then Senator Barack Obama called for his colleagues considering the nuclear option to consider “free and democratic debate.”:“Mr. President, I rise today to urge my colleagues to think about the implications of what has been called the nuclear option and what effect that might have on this Chamber and on this country. I urge all of us to think not just about winning every debate but about protecting free and democratic debate.”(Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL), Floor Remarks, Washington, DC, 4/13/05)"

http://libertyunyielding.com/2013/12/02/dems-...

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