Barack Obama, our next President

There are 20 comments on the Hampton Roads Daily Press story from Nov 5, 2008, titled Barack Obama, our next President. In it, Hampton Roads Daily Press reports that:

"The road ahead will be long. Our climb will be steep," Obama cautioned. Young and charismatic but with little experience on the national level, Obama smashed through racial barriers and easily defeated ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Hampton Roads Daily Press.

Since: Jun 13

Orlando, FL

#1011455 Oct 25, 2013
DBWriter wrote:
<quoted text>
Like Saul Alinsky said, you have to create the problem before you can propose the solution.
The problem = Obamacare.
The solution = Single-payer universal health care.

Just wait and see. Reid let the cat out of the bag on PBS.
dem

Chicago, IL

#1011456 Oct 25, 2013
Scientific inquiry into the wave nature of light began in the 17th and 18th centuries when scientists such as Robert Hooke, Christian Huygens and Leonhard Euler proposed a wave theory of light based on experimental observations.[3] In 1803, Thomas Young, an English polymath, performed the famous double-slit experiment that he later described in a paper entitled "On the nature of light and colours". This experiment played a major role in the general acceptance of the wave theory of light.

In 1838, with the discovery of cathode rays by Michael Faraday, these studies were followed by the 1859 statement of the black-body radiation problem by Gustav Kirchhoff, the 1877 suggestion by Ludwig Boltzmann that the energy states of a physical system can be discrete, and the 1900 quantum hypothesis of Max Planck.[4] Planck's hypothesis that energy is radiated and absorbed in discrete "quanta" (or "energy elements") precisely matched the observed patterns of black-body radiation.
WOW

Bronx, NY

#1011457 Oct 25, 2013
dem wrote:
get to ignoring you tea bag terrorists.
time for school
I'm here now 8itch stfu

Since: Sep 08

Location hidden

#1011458 Oct 25, 2013
John Galt wrote:
Chrissie Hayes, host of MSNBC's All In, has a favorite tactic--though not an original one: connecting today's Republicans with the racist Democrats of the old South. In June, she rewrote history by casting George Wallace as a Republican--an error for which, to her credit, she later apologized. On Wednesday, she appeared to use a more subtle tactic to connect the Tea Party's Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, and Marco Rubio to the Ku Klux Klan.
In a segment on possible Tea Party contenders for the Republican Party's nomination in the 2016 presidential race, Hayes used a graphic that portrayed Cruz, Paul, and Rubio as kings in a deck of cards--and that, rather conveniently, spelled out the initials "K K K." (Hayes did not say the word "kings" during the segment.)
The use of KKK imagery--historically associated with Democrats, not Republicans--to describe the Tea Party would not be unique to Hayes. Rep. Alan Grayson (D-FL) recently used a burning cross to provide the "T" in "Tea Party" in a fundraising email. Hayes's "dog whistle" was more clever, but--if intentional--no less offensive.
There is a hazard, of course, in taking offense too quickly at bad jokes, and there is always the possibility that Hayes was unaware of the graphic, or even that the KKK reference was entirely coincidental. However, given Hayes's past record, and the constant obsession of fellow MSNBC anchors with making false accusations of racism against the Tea Party and the Republican Party, Hayes has arguably exhausted the benefit of the doubt.
What's wrong? Afraid if you acknowledge Breitbart is the source of your cut and past you will look stupid? You're right.
dem

Chicago, IL

#1011459 Oct 25, 2013
In 1896, Wilhelm Wien empirically determined a distribution law of black-body radiation, known as Wien's law in his honor. Ludwig Boltzmann independently arrived at this result by considerations of Maxwell's equations. However, it was valid only at high frequencies, and underestimated the radiance at low frequencies. Later, Max Planck corrected this model using Boltzmann statistical interpretation of thermodynamics and proposed what is now called Planck's law, which led to the development of quantum mechanics.

Among the first to study quantum phenomena in nature were Arthur Compton, C.V. Raman, Pieter Zeeman, each of whom has a quantum effect named after him. Robert A. Millikan studied the Photoelectric effect experimentally and Albert Einstein developed a theory for it. At the same time Niels Bohr developed his theory of the atomic structure which was later confirmed by the experiments of Henry Moseley. In 1913, Peter Debye extended Niels Bohr's theory of atomic structure, introducing elliptical orbits, a concept also introduced by Arnold Sommerfeld.[5] This phase is known as Old quantum theory.

According to Planck, each energy element E is proportional to its frequency &#957;:
dem

Euless, TX

#1011460 Oct 25, 2013
dem wrote:
looks as though, like everything with dumb carol, filth and crudeness are only subjective to party lines. she loves her some Fenris
; )
my van down by the river smells bad because the coffee can i poop in is full!
WOW

Bronx, NY

#1011461 Oct 25, 2013
dem wrote:
The earliest versions of quantum mechanics were formulated in the first decade of the 20th century. At around the same time, the atomic theory and the corpuscular theory of light (as updated by Einstein) first came to be widely accepted as scientific fact; these latter theories can be viewed as quantum theories of matter and electromagnetic radiation, respectively. Early quantum theory was significantly reformulated in the mid-1920s by Werner Heisenberg, Max Born and Pascual Jordan, who created matrix mechanics; Louis de Broglie and Erwin Schrödinger (Wave Mechanics); and Wolfgang Pauli and Satyendra Nath Bose (statistics of subatomic particles). Moreover, the Copenhagen interpretation of Niels Bohr became widely accepted. By 1930, quantum mechanics had been further unified and formalized by the work of David Hilbert, Paul Dirac and John von Neumann,[2] with a greater emphasis placed on measurement in quantum mechanics, the statistical nature of our knowledge of reality, and philosophical speculation about the role of the observer. Quantum mechanics has since branched out into almost every aspect of 20th century physics and other disciplines, such as quantum chemistry, quantum electronics, quantum optics, and quantum information science. Much 19th century physics has been re-evaluated as the "classical limit" of quantum mechanics, and its more advanced developments in terms of quantum field theory, string theory, and speculative quantum gravity theories.
I would be impressed if you had a advanced degree in PHYSICS STFU DEM
No Surprize

Seminole, FL

#1011462 Oct 25, 2013
USAsince1680 wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, thanks for the reminder. Their group offers a good study into choice blindness, paranoia, fantasy, gang mentality and the dumbing down of America by right wing media.
God. What a sorry ass life you have, you miserable little old woman...

It's the culture...
TSM

El Paso, TX

#1011463 Oct 25, 2013
Obamacare is the most reckless/destructive piece of Legislation ever force on the American People!! The probability of ‘Obamacare’ we could wind up with more Americans uninsured than insured!!
dem

Chicago, IL

#1011464 Oct 25, 2013
WOW wrote:
<quoted text>I'm here now 8itch stfu
get to suckin, beitch

“Constitutionalis t”

Since: Dec 10

Spring, TX

#1011465 Oct 25, 2013
Realtime wrote:
UPS now hiring 55,000 holiday season workers.
Kroger set to hire 1200 in S E Ohio.
DOW up nicely today in spite of bad news in Asian market.
And for Flack www.aeromobil.com
It really looks like you want to anser this question:

Why is Obama's "recovery" generating 5 part time jobs for every 1 full time job, thus putting 5 people into poverty for every 1 person it allows a living wage?

Your post seems to be in contradiction with the real world.

Why are the rich fat cats on Wall Street getting richer while Obama is putting 5 people in poverty for every 1 person achieving a living wage?
I'd like to see your explanation of how that happens. Who is orchestrating the flow of money to the richest while the poor get poorer with Obama running the economy?
dem

Chicago, IL

#1011466 Oct 25, 2013
where h is Planck's constant. Planck (cautiously) insisted that this was simply an aspect of the processes of absorption and emission of radiation and had nothing to do with the physical reality of the radiation itself.[6] In fact, he considered his quantum hypothesis a mathematical trick to get the right answer rather than a sizeable discovery. However, in 1905 Albert Einstein interpreted Planck's quantum hypothesis realistically and used it to explain the photoelectric effect, in which shining light on certain materials can eject electrons from the material.


The 1927 Solvay Conference in Brussels.The foundations of quantum mechanics were established during the first half of the 20th century by Max Planck, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Louis de Broglie, Arthur Compton, Albert Einstein, Erwin Schrödinger, Max Born, John von Neumann, Paul Dirac, Enrico Fermi, Wolfgang Pauli, Max von Laue, Freeman Dyson, David Hilbert, Wilhelm Wien, Satyendra Nath Bose, Arnold Sommerfeld and others. In the mid-1920s, developments in quantum mechanics led to its becoming the standard formulation for atomic physics. In the summer of 1925, Bohr and Heisenberg published results that closed the "Old Quantum Theory". Out of deference to their particle-like behavior in certain processes and measurements, light quanta came to be called photons (1926). From Einstein's simple postulation was born a flurry of debating, theorizing, and testing. Thus the entire field of quantum physics emerged, leading to its wider acceptance at the Fifth Solvay Conference in 1927.
dem

Chicago, IL

#1011467 Oct 25, 2013
The other exemplar that led to quantum mechanics was the study of electromagnetic waves, such as visible and ultraviolet light. When it was found in 1900 by Max Planck that the energy of waves could be described as consisting of small packets or "quanta", Albert Einstein further developed this idea to show that an electromagnetic wave such as light could also be described as a particle (later called the photon) with a discrete quantum of energy that was dependent on its frequency.[7] As a matter of fact, Einstein was able to use the photon theory of light to explain the photoelectric effect, for which he won the Nobel Prize in 1921. This led to a theory of unity between subatomic particles and electromagnetic waves, called wave–particle duality, in which particles and waves were neither one nor the other, but had certain properties of both. Thus coined the term wave-particle duality.

While quantum mechanics traditionally described the world of the very small, it is also needed to explain certain recently investigated macroscopic systems such as superconductors, superfluids, and larger organic molecules.[8]

The word quantum derives from the Latin, meaning "how great" or "how much".[9] In quantum mechanics, it refers to a discrete unit that quantum theory assigns to certain physical quantities, such as the energy of an atom at rest (see Figure 1). The discovery that particles are discrete packets of energy with wave-like properties led to the branch of physics dealing with atomic and sub-atomic systems which is today called quantum mechanics. It is the underlying mathematical framework of many fields of physics and chemistry, including condensed matter physics, solid-state physics, atomic physics, molecular physics, computational physics, computational chemistry, quantum chemistry, particle physics, nuclear chemistry, and nuclear physics.[10] Some fundamental aspects of the theory are still actively studied.[11]
tell_it_like_it_ IS

Euless, TX

#1011468 Oct 25, 2013
Realtime wrote:
<quoted text>It's become trimmer during Obama and the deficit is shrinking.
Its not

The deficit that is shrinking...
Your brain matter is...
dem

Chicago, IL

#1011469 Oct 25, 2013
Quantum mechanics is essential to understanding the behavior of systems at atomic length scales and smaller. If classical mechanics alone governed the workings of an atom, electrons could not really "orbit" the nucleus. Since bodies in circular motion are accelerating, electrons must emit radiation, losing energy and eventually colliding with the nucleus in the process. This clearly contradicts the existence of stable atoms. However, in the natural world, electrons normally remain in an uncertain, non-deterministic, "smeared", probabilistic, wave–particle wavefunction orbital path around (or through) the nucleus, defying the traditional assumptions of classical mechanics and electromagnetism.[12]

Quantum mechanics was initially developed to provide a better explanation and description of the atom, especially the differences in the spectra of light emitted by different isotopes of the same element, as well as subatomic particles. In short, the quantum-mechanical atomic model has succeeded spectacularly in the realm where classical mechanics and electromagnetism falter.

Broadly speaking, quantum mechanics incorporates four classes of phenomena for which classical physics cannot account:
dem

Chicago, IL

#1011470 Oct 25, 2013
the brooklyn phaggot was up all night dreaming of my co ck
Quantum mechanics is essential to understanding the behavior of systems at atomic length scales and smaller. If classical mechanics alone governed the workings of an atom, electrons could not really "orbit" the nucleus. Since bodies in circular motion are accelerating, electrons must emit radiation, losing energy and eventually colliding with the nucleus in the process. This clearly contradicts the existence of stable atoms. However, in the natural world, electrons normally remain in an uncertain, non-deterministic, "smeared", probabilistic, wave–particle wavefunction orbital path around (or through) the nucleus, defying the traditional assumptions of classical mechanics and electromagnetism.[12]

Quantum mechanics was initially developed to provide a better explanation and description of the atom, especially the differences in the spectra of light emitted by different isotopes of the same element, as well as subatomic particles. In short, the quantum-mechanical atomic model has succeeded spectacularly in the realm where classical mechanics and electromagnetism falter.

Broadly speaking, quantum mechanics incorporates four classes of phenomena for which classical physics cannot account:
dem

Chicago, IL

#1011471 Oct 25, 2013
In the mathematically rigorous formulation of quantum mechanics developed by Paul Dirac,[13] David Hilbert,[14] John von Neumann,[15] and Hermann Weyl[16] the possible states of a quantum mechanical system are represented by unit vectors (called "state vectors"). Formally, these reside in a complex separable Hilbert space - variously called the "state space" or the "associated Hilbert space" of the system - that is well defined up to a complex number of norm 1 (the phase factor). In other words, the possible states are points in the projective space of a Hilbert space, usually called the complex projective space. The exact nature of this Hilbert space is dependent on the system - for example, the state space for position and momentum states is the space of square-integrable functions, while the state space for the spin of a single proton is just the product of two complex planes. Each observable is represented by a maximally Hermitian (precisely: by a self-adjoint) linear operator acting on the state space. Each eigenstate of an observable corresponds to an eigenvector of the operator, and the associated eigenvalue corresponds to the value of the observable in that eigenstate. If the operator's spectrum is discrete, the observable can attain only those discrete eigenvalues.

“Often imitated”

Since: Jul 07

never duplicated

#1011472 Oct 25, 2013
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>Obama hasn't killed as many Americans for no reason son.
But I see killing Americans is acceptable to you....
typical libturd, you can't read.
dem

Chicago, IL

#1011473 Oct 25, 2013
In the formalism of quantum mechanics, the state of a system at a given time is described by a complex wave function, also referred to as state vector in a complex vector space.[17] This abstract mathematical object allows for the calculation of probabilities of outcomes of concrete experiments. For example, it allows one to compute the probability of finding an electron in a particular region around the nucleus at a particular time. Contrary to classical mechanics, one can never make simultaneous predictions of conjugate variables, such as position and momentum, with accuracy. For instance, electrons may be considered (to a certain probability) to be located somewhere within a given region of space, but with their exact positions unknown. Contours of constant probability, often referred to as "clouds", may be drawn around the nucleus of an atom to conceptualize where the electron might be located with the most probability. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle quantifies the inability to precisely locate the particle given its conjugate momentum.[18]

According to one interpretation, as the result of a measurement the wave function containing the probability information for a system collapses from a given initial state to a particular eigenstate. The possible results of a measurement are the eigenvalues of the operator representing the observable — which explains the choice of Hermitian operators, for which all the eigenvalues are real. The probability distribution of an observable in a given state can be found by computing the spectral decomposition of the corresponding operator. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is represented by the statement that the operators corresponding to certain observables do not commute.

The probabilistic nature of quantum mechanics thus stems from the act of measurement. This is one of the most difficult aspects of quantum systems to understand. It was the central topic in the famous Bohr-Einstein debates, in which the two scientists attempted to clarify these fundamental principles by way of thought experiments. In the decades after the formulation of quantum mechanics, the question of what constitutes a "measurement" has been extensively studied. Newer interpretations of quantum mechanics have been formulated that do away with the concept of "wavefunction collapse" (see, for example, the relative state interpretation). The basic idea is that when a quantum system interacts with a measuring apparatus, their respective wavefunctions become entangled, so that the original quantum system ceases to exist as an independent entity. For details, see the article on measurement in quantum mechanics.[19]
No Surprize

Seminole, FL

#1011474 Oct 25, 2013
USAsince1680 wrote:
<quoted text>
What's wrong? Afraid if you acknowledge Breitbart is the source of your cut and past you will look stupid? You're right.
The eyes are useless when your mind is blind with hate old woman...

It's the culture...

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