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“I Am Mine”

Since: Dec 08

Location hidden

#21 Apr 28, 2014
edogxxx wrote:
<quoted text>
You asked for an important document written in cursive, as if one didn't exist. I provided an example, now you're changing your tune
Not changing at all. She said "Cursive is important because lots of documents and things are in cursive and kids should read it.."

The constitution is widely available in print. Not reading in cursive is not an impediment to reading the constitution. I'm asking for an example of an important document to which not reading cursive is an impediment.

Toj

“Where is Everyone?”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#22 Apr 28, 2014
PEllen wrote:
<quoted text>
Did you go to Catholic grammar school?
Your previous post about Catholic grammar school writing -- I agree with you.

At the same time, I went to Catholic grammar school and one of my bosses did as well. The one that went to Catholic school writes like crap and the one that didn't has beautiful handwriting. Eh, so who knows.

Toj

“Where is Everyone?”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#23 Apr 28, 2014
Mister Tonka wrote:
<quoted text>
Not changing at all. She said "Cursive is important because lots of documents and things are in cursive and kids should read it.."
The constitution is widely available in print. Not reading in cursive is not an impediment to reading the constitution. I'm asking for an example of an important document to which not reading cursive is an impediment.
There is none. Except maybe a note from your grandmother.:D

Since: Jun 09

Saint Petersburg, FL

#24 Apr 28, 2014
cheluzal wrote:
<quoted text>
I beseech you to stop putting words in my mouth.
I said the techno age made people idiots. Nowhere did I say not being able to write in cursive made people idiots, yet that is what you unjustly deduced. Grr...
And teaching their name is better than nothing at all, consider it is NOT in my curriculum and I take the time to do it because I feel they should at least be able to sign their name in cursive.
Cursive is important because lots of documents and things are in cursive and kids should read it....although, since we're mowing though the Constitution I guess it doesn't matter if they can read it or not!
What chel said. The public schools here aren't even required to teach cursive. It's a shame. I think it's part of the "dumbing down" of America. My friend's granson is in the fifth grade and hasn't learned cursive. My daughter started learning it in 2nd grade, though (n 5th now, too), but she's in private school.

There are old documents that are written in cursive, a lot of people STILL use it, so kids should eb able to read it. I kind of want my greandkids to be able to read, for example, our family tree or old family letters, my mother's old poetry, etc. And they are all in cursive.
pde

Bothell, WA

#25 Apr 28, 2014
Stina2 wrote:
<quoted text>
There are old documents that are written in cursive, a lot of people STILL use it, so kids should eb able to read it. I kind of want my greandkids to be able to read, for example, our family tree or old family letters, my mother's old poetry, etc. And they are all in cursive.
Reading and writing cursive are two different skill sets. My son can't write in cursive (he's in 2nd grade) but he can read it.

Writing cursive is a lot harder skill to master than reading cursive.

Toj

“Where is Everyone?”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#26 Apr 28, 2014
It seems that cursive writing is the standard in Florida schools. In an article from February 2014:

"In an interview, Sarasota County veteran teacher Diane Lagerman, a 30-year educator who retired last month from Cranberry Elementary in North Port, applauded the decision to add cursive into the standards.

While some may see cursive a “dying, lost art,” Lagerman called it an invaluable way for her students to practice eye-hand coordination and their fine motor skills.

“We need those building blocks in early education,” Lagerman, who taught third grade for 21 years. "It's part of their growth.""

Here's the link: http://politics.heraldtribune.com/2014/02/18/...

Since: Jun 09

Saint Petersburg, FL

#27 Apr 28, 2014
Toj wrote:
It seems that cursive writing is the standard in Florida schools. In an article from February 2014:
"In an interview, Sarasota County veteran teacher Diane Lagerman, a 30-year educator who retired last month from Cranberry Elementary in North Port, applauded the decision to add cursive into the standards.
While some may see cursive a “dying, lost art,” Lagerman called it an invaluable way for her students to practice eye-hand coordination and their fine motor skills.
“We need those building blocks in early education,” Lagerman, who taught third grade for 21 years. "It's part of their growth.""
Here's the link: http://politics.heraldtribune.com/2014/02/18/...
Good - it looks like they voted to add that into the standards! From what I can see in this article it looks like their revising the standards they set in 2010 and one of the revisions will be adding cursive. I am so glad to hear that! I never heard of such a thing until my friend told me about her grandson never learning it. I never thought about it since my daughter had learned it already (penmanship, not so much).

Since: Jun 09

Saint Petersburg, FL

#28 Apr 28, 2014
Toj wrote:
It seems that cursive writing is the standard in Florida schools. In an article from February 2014:
"In an interview, Sarasota County veteran teacher Diane Lagerman, a 30-year educator who retired last month from Cranberry Elementary in North Port, applauded the decision to add cursive into the standards.
While some may see cursive a “dying, lost art,” Lagerman called it an invaluable way for her students to practice eye-hand coordination and their fine motor skills.
“We need those building blocks in early education,” Lagerman, who taught third grade for 21 years. "It's part of their growth.""
Here's the link: http://politics.heraldtribune.com/2014/02/18/...
Here it explains it some more:

Cursive writing could become part of Florida Schools' Common Core Standards

February 21, 2014|By Leslie Postal, Orlando Sentinel

Cursive writing could survive in Florida schools after all. Education Commissioner Pam Stewart said recently she'll likely recommend that cursive writing still be taught in the state. It's one of about 40 changes she plans to suggest to the coming Common Core standards that have been under fire from some politicians and members of the public in recent months. Learning to write in cursive already has been de-emphasized in many Florida classrooms in recent years, though some schools still require such lessons. But cursive writing is left out entirely under Common Core, the benchmarks for what students should learn in language arts and mathematics. Florida adopted Common Core in 2010 and is now phasing it into public schools. After reviewing public suggestions on Common Core taken in October, Stewart told the Florida Senate education committee that she'd likely recommend cursive writing be added.

“I Am Mine”

Since: Dec 08

Location hidden

#29 Apr 28, 2014
Stina2 wrote:
<quoted text>
Here it explains it some more:
Cursive writing could become part of Florida Schools' Common Core Standards
February 21, 2014|By Leslie Postal, Orlando Sentinel
Cursive writing could survive in Florida schools after all. Education Commissioner Pam Stewart said recently she'll likely recommend that cursive writing still be taught in the state. It's one of about 40 changes she plans to suggest to the coming Common Core standards that have been under fire from some politicians and members of the public in recent months. Learning to write in cursive already has been de-emphasized in many Florida classrooms in recent years, though some schools still require such lessons. But cursive writing is left out entirely under Common Core, the benchmarks for what students should learn in language arts and mathematics. Florida adopted Common Core in 2010 and is now phasing it into public schools. After reviewing public suggestions on Common Core taken in October, Stewart told the Florida Senate education committee that she'd likely recommend cursive writing be added.
My take on this is that while I see no real value in teaching it, I don't have a problem with it being taught. There are many things I did in school that I've never revisited upon graduation. Many of them only valuable to a small portion of the students. Derivatives. Quadratic equations. Disecting a frog. The periodic table. Handwriting. These are things that are just not necessary in most people's lives.

But you don't know who's who before the fact.

Toj

“Where is Everyone?”

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#30 Apr 28, 2014
Stina2 wrote:
<quoted text>
Here it explains it some more:
Cursive writing could become part of Florida Schools' Common Core Standards
February 21, 2014|By Leslie Postal, Orlando Sentinel
Cursive writing could survive in Florida schools after all. Education Commissioner Pam Stewart said recently she'll likely recommend that cursive writing still be taught in the state. It's one of about 40 changes she plans to suggest to the coming Common Core standards that have been under fire from some politicians and members of the public in recent months. Learning to write in cursive already has been de-emphasized in many Florida classrooms in recent years, though some schools still require such lessons. But cursive writing is left out entirely under Common Core, the benchmarks for what students should learn in language arts and mathematics. Florida adopted Common Core in 2010 and is now phasing it into public schools. After reviewing public suggestions on Common Core taken in October, Stewart told the Florida Senate education committee that she'd likely recommend cursive writing be added.
Personally, I would want my child to learn cursive and if it wasn't in the curriculum, I would teach it to my child myself. When my kid was younger, they taught algebra (and math in general) differently than when I had it. I taught him the way I knew and he actually could understand and connect better with math the way I was taught.

New or different teaching methods aren't necessarily better. Sometimes they are, though, I will admit that.

“I Am Mine”

Since: Dec 08

Location hidden

#31 Apr 28, 2014
Toj wrote:
<quoted text>
Personally, I would want my child to learn cursive and if it wasn't in the curriculum, I would teach it to my child myself. When my kid was younger, they taught algebra (and math in general) differently than when I had it. I taught him the way I knew and he actually could understand and connect better with math the way I was taught.
New or different teaching methods aren't necessarily better. Sometimes they are, though, I will admit that.
my kid's in 1st grade. I check over his homework and sometimes I have to email the teacher cause I have no idea what is being asked and math was/is my stong suit

“...,to wit”

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#32 Apr 28, 2014
Mister Tonka wrote:
<quoted text>my kid's in 1st grade. I check over his homework and sometimes I have to email the teacher cause I have no idea what is being asked and math was/is my stong suit
Some things never change. This came out roughly 1965. If Aisle Sitter is lurking, she knows what the link is.

Since: Jun 09

Saint Petersburg, FL

#33 Apr 28, 2014
Mister Tonka wrote:
<quoted text>my kid's in 1st grade. I check over his homework and sometimes I have to email the teacher cause I have no idea what is being asked and math was/is my stong suit
Yeah, I agree with that! My daughter's math worksheets are worded VERY poorly and sometimes, no matter how long I look at it, it just makes no sense at all. It makes things extra hard because my daughter HATES math and is not very good at it (right now she has all A's and a D in math, but we've been working on it). It doesn't help at all when the sheets themselves aren't clear.

Since: Jun 09

Saint Petersburg, FL

#34 Apr 28, 2014
Mister Tonka wrote:
<quoted text>My take on this is that while I see no real value in teaching it, I don't have a problem with it being taught. There are many things I did in school that I've never revisited upon graduation. Many of them only valuable to a small portion of the students. Derivatives. Quadratic equations. Disecting a frog. The periodic table. Handwriting. These are things that are just not necessary in most people's lives.
But you don't know who's who before the fact.
Dont' you ever have to handwrite a note at work, like an interoffice note to a member of upper management? Cursive looks so much nicer and is much more professional. I don't use it A LOT, but if I have to write a quick note on something for a colleague or a client, I write in very neat and legible cursive.

My print is very gender-neutral and sort of blocky. I HATE when I get a note from someone at work and the person's print looks like a middle schooler wrote it (minus the hearts on top of the letter "i"). Very unprofessional.

“I Am Mine”

Since: Dec 08

Location hidden

#35 Apr 28, 2014
Stina2 wrote:
<quoted text>
Dont' you ever have to handwrite a note at work, like an interoffice note to a member of upper management?
Nope. Never. In the work force for 20 years.
Stina2 wrote:
Cursive looks so much nicer and is much more professional. I don't use it A LOT, but if I have to write a quick note on something for a colleague or a client, I write in very neat and legible cursive.
email or a printed post-it note
Stina2 wrote:
My print is very gender-neutral and sort of blocky. I HATE when I get a note from someone at work and the person's print looks like a middle schooler wrote it (minus the hearts on top of the letter "i"). Very unprofessional.
I only care that I can read it and their wording makes clear what they are trying to say.
pde

Bothell, WA

#36 Apr 28, 2014
Stina2 wrote:
<quoted text>
Dont' you ever have to handwrite a note at work, like an interoffice note to a member of upper management? Cursive looks so much nicer and is much more professional. I don't use it A LOT, but if I have to write a quick note on something for a colleague or a client, I write in very neat and legible cursive.
No, I wouldn't ever send a handwritten (cursive) note to anyone in management or to coworkers. There's too big of a risk that the person wouldn't be able to read it. And as I mentioned above, I've never had truly beautiful cursive but it's acceptable enough that I got through Catholic school handwriting with it.

“The two baby belly, please!”

Since: Sep 09

Evanston IL

#37 Apr 28, 2014
My 2nd grader asked me to teach her how to sign her name in cursive, so I did. I have no idea if they're going to teach it to her later, but I will gladly help her if they dont' and she wants to. I dig that calligraphy stuff, so we could have a good time testing all the fonts out.

We (my family) has a hand-written diary penned by a relative who lived in Chicago and documented The Fire from his home (not burned). He had lovely handwriting - that is completely impossible to read. Like I said above, I like calligraphy and had done a lot of it by the time I got to high school (when this book came into our possesion) and there were words that were totally undecipherable, no matter what font I thought he might have been using. So just 'cause it looks pretty does not make it functional.

Personally, I guess I use a mix of cursive and printing in my daily handwritting. I must be doing something right because none of my coworkers ever come to me and say they can't read something I've written. Cannot say the same thing about my coworkers, however. Terrible, terrible handwriting...

My style did get me in trouble once with a job. I was a cage cashier on a riverboat casino and we had to sign the straps of money we counted and on one review, I was told that my signature was too "printed." I told them that if it was good enough to sign my taxes, it was good enough for them. I also pointed out that because of my legible signature, they would be able to tell who actually counted the money because they could read it, instead of the doctor-like scrawl that the other cashiers used. But just to be a good little employee, I added some loops to the Ls in my last name.
cheluzal

Plant City, FL

#38 Apr 29, 2014
Mister Tonka wrote:
<quoted text>
Perhaps YOU should express yourself a little more clearly.
No, you infer things that aren't stated.
I state my thoughts clear enough.
You're the problem.
Conversation terminated.

“I Am Mine”

Since: Dec 08

Location hidden

#39 Apr 29, 2014
cheluzal wrote:
<quoted text>
No, you infer things that aren't stated.
Its called context. Perhaps one of the other English teachers in your department can help you.

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