BARACK OBAMA BIRTH CERTIFICATE: Suit ...

BARACK OBAMA BIRTH CERTIFICATE: Suit contesting Obama's citizen...

There are 214539 comments on the Chicago Tribune story from Jan 8, 2009, titled BARACK OBAMA BIRTH CERTIFICATE: Suit contesting Obama's citizen.... In it, Chicago Tribune reports that:

The U.S. Supreme Court will consider Friday whether to take up a lawsuit challenging President-elect Barack Obama 's U.S. citizenship, a continuation of a New Jersey case embraced by some opponents of Obama's ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Chicago Tribune.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#197113 Jul 30, 2014
Jacques from Ottawa wrote:
<quoted text>
You : "True, you needed a travel permit to leave Iraq under Saddamn Husein and Saddamn needed slaves." Catholics were slaves? Really? And please show some proof that Iraqis needed permits to leave Iraq. That is not my understanding;
2. How long in South Korea? Much too long, 64 years. But,hey, it suits the South Koreans a lot more than it suits the U.S., And, unlike Afghanistan and Iraq, U.S. soldiers have not been killed since 1953, except for the odd incident. And South Korea, like Germany, offsets a lot of the cost of "occupation". And , strategically, it used to suit the U.S. geographically though that is no longer necessary, what with faster transport and instant communications;
3. Don't deny the persecution of today's Christians in Iraq, please. And ,in Saddam's day, they were not persecuted unless they opposed Saddam. They were smart, most did not, why, one of them was even the foreign minister. Did you even know that Iraq was a secular state, one of the rare ones in the M.Eeast? Why bring your number 1 enemy into this, S.Arabia, which persecutes anyone who is not Muslim? You invaded the wrong country, then invited their prince to the Bush ranch 2 days after 9/11. Great.;
4. No one denies Saddam gased Kurds. He was a cruel tyrant. No one denies that. I didn't say he protected Kurds;
5. Yes, you're right. Foreign minister, Azis was. My bad. Anyhow --- well, faith was practiced without crucifixes. Not bad;
6.Again with the religion of the presidents. I've told you a million times, and I don't care if presidents were Repub or Dem, they all went to Sunday services to garner votes, EXCEPT Carter who was the only devout and sincere Christian. How many times do I have to repeat that?
1) Yep, EVERYONE that lived in Iraq while Saddamn was in power was, for all practices purposes, a slave. Just like Soviet Russia!!!
2) No US casualties in and around South Korea since 1953? That is not hard to shoot holes in. In 1969 we had 31 Americans killed by North Korea alone!!!
1969 EC-121 shootdown incident
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The 1969 EC-121 shootdown incident occurred on April 15, 1969 when a United States Navy Lockheed EC-121M Warning Star on a reconnaissance mission was shot down by North Korean MiG-17 aircraft over the Sea of Japan. The plane crashed 90 nautical miles (167 km) off the North Korean coast and all 31 Americans on board were killed.

The Nixon administration chose not to retaliate against North Korea apart from staging a naval demonstration in the Sea of Japan a few days later. Instead it resumed the reconnaissance flights within a week to demonstrate that it would not be intimidated by the action while at the same time avoiding a confrontation.
3) But they could not practice their Christian faith either. No cross allowed on the outside of your church nor the inside. Caught with a Bible, EXECUTED!
4)***
5) So Saddamn did not have them crucified. Just a bullet in the back of the head is all. And you are okay with that too!!!
6) And Carter was the ONLY devout Christian? Reagan and both Bushs are too!

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#197114 Jul 30, 2014
And this is why you DEMOCRATS are pushing Impeachment. You are more affraid of the lawsuit!!!

U.S. House panel votes to authorize lawsuit against Obama
By Annika McGinnis - WASHINGTON Thu Jul 24
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/07/24/us-...

Sooo you are NOT affraid!

Rep. Marcia Fudge calls GOP lawsuit against President Obama an abuse of power
Sabrina Eaton, Plain Dealer Washington Reporter By Sabrina Eaton, Plain Dealer Washington Reporter - July 28, 2014

WASHINGTON, D. C.- As the GOP-controlled House of Representatives prepares to sue President Barack Obama for delaying the Affordable Care Act's employer mandate, Rep. Marcia Fudge took to the House floor on Monday to denounce the action as "a political stunt" that will "waste millions of tax dollars."

Naw, dose Dems ain't worried ..... much!

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#197115 Jul 30, 2014
List of border incidents involving North Korea
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The following is a partial list of border incidents involving North Korea since the Korean Armistice Agreement of July 27, 1953, ended large scale military action of the Korean War. Most of these incidents took place near either the Korean Demilitarized Zone or the Northern Limit Line. This list includes engagements on land, air, and sea, but does not include alleged incursions and terrorist incidents that occurred away from the border.

Many of the incidents occurring at sea are due to border disputes. In 1977 North Korea claimed an Exclusive Economic Zone over a large area south of the disputed western maritime border, the Northern Limit Line in the Yellow Sea.[1] This is a prime fishing area, particularly for crabs, and clashes commonly occur. According to the 5 January 2011 Korea Herald, since July 1953 North Korea has violated the armistice 221 times, including 26 military attacks

1950s

16 February 1958: North Korean agents hijack a South Korean airliner to Pyongyang en route from Pusan to Seoul; 1 American pilot, 1 American passenger, 2 West German passengers, and 24 other passengers were released in early March, but 8 other passengers remained in the North.[3]

1960s

1964: North Korea creates an underground group: Revolution Party for Reunification, this group is ground down and eliminated by South Korean authorities by 1969 [4]
April 27, 1965: Two North Korean MiG-17s attack a United States EC-121 Warning Star reconnaissance plane above the Sea of Japan, 80 km (50 mi) from the North Korean shore. The aircraft was damaged, but managed to land at Yokota Air Base, Japan.[5][6]
January 17, 1968: In an incident known as the Blue House Raid, a 31-man detachment from the Korean People's Army secretly crosses the DMZ on a mission to kill South Korean President Park Chung-hee on January 21, nearly succeeding. The incursion was discovered after South Korean civilians confronted the North Koreans and informed the authorities. After entering Seoul disguised as South Korean soldiers, the North Koreans attempt to enter the Blue House (the official residence of the President of South Korea). The North Koreans are confronted by South Korean police and a firefight ensued. The North Koreans fled Seoul and individually attempted to cross the DMZ back to North Korea. Of the original group of 31 North Koreans, 28 were killed, one was captured, and two are unaccounted for. Additionally, 68 South Koreans were killed and 66 were wounded, the majority of whom were soldiers and police officers. Three American soldiers were also killed and three were wounded.[7]
January 23, 1968: The United States Naval ship the USS Pueblo is boarded and captured, along with its crew, by North Korean forces in the Sea of Japan. The entire crew of 83 is captured, with the exception of one sailor killed in the initial attack on the vessel, and the vessel was taken to a North Korean port. All the captives were released on December 23 of the same year via the Bridge of No Return at the DMZ. The USS Pueblo is still in North Korean possession and is docked in Pyongyang and is on display as a museum ship.[8]
From March 1968 and March 1969, various military skirmishes took place in the Paektusan region between the North Korean and Chinese armed forces.[9]
October 30, 1968: From October 30 to November 2, 120 to 130 North Korean commandos land on the northeast shore of South Korea, allegedly to establish a base in order to wage a guerrilla war against the South Korean government. A total of 110 to 113 were killed, seven were captured, and 13 escaped. Around 20 South Korean civilians, law enforcement officers, and soldiers were killed.[6][10]

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#197116 Jul 30, 2014
March 1969: Six North Korean commandos kill a South Korean police officer near Jumunjin, Gangwon-do. Seven American soldiers are killed in a North Korean attack along the DMZ.[11]
April 1969: An EC-121, US reconnaissance plane is shot down 90 miles (140 km) east of the North Korean coast, leaving 31 dead.
November 1969: Four US soldiers are killed by North Koreans in the Demilitarized Zone.
December 11, 1969: North Korean agent Cho Ch'ang-h&#468;i hijacked a Korean Air Lines YS-11 flying from Gangneung Airbase in Gangneung, Gangwon-do to Gimpo International Airport in Seoul. It was carrying four crewmembers and 46 passengers (excluding Cho); 39 of the passengers were returned two months later, but the crew and seven passengers remained in North Korea. The aircraft was damaged beyond repair on landing.

1970s

April 1970: In Geumchon, a region of Paju south of the DMZ, a clash leaves three North Korean soldiers dead and five South Korean soldiers wounded.
June 1970: The North Korean navy seizes a broadcast vessel from the South near the Northern Limit Line. 20 crew are captured.
February 1974: Two South Korean fishing vessels are sunk and 30 crew detained by the North.
1974: The first tunnel into ROK is discovered (the three following tunnels were found in 1975, 1978, 1990)[12]
June 1976: An incursion south of the DMZ in Gangwon-do leaves three dead from the North and six from the South.
August 18, 1976: The Axe murder incident -- an attempt to clear brush in the Demilitarized Zone near Panmunjom ends with two US soldiers dead.
October 1979: Three North Koreans enter the eastern DMZ. One is killed.
December 1979: One US Army soldier killed, three US soldiers wounded after stumbling into a North Korean minefield in a heavy fog while patrolling DMZ. One body is recovered from the North Koreans five days later.

1980s

March 1980: Three North Koreans are killed while trying to cross the Han River estuary.
May 1980: North Koreans engage OP Ouillette on DMZ in firefight. One North Korean WIA.
March 1981: Three North Koreans try to enter the South in Geumhwa-eup, Cheorwon, Gangwon-do; one is killed.
July 1981: Three North Koreans are killed trying to cross the Imjin River to the South.
November 1984: Nine North Korean soldiers and one South Korean soldier die, and one American soldier is wounded during the firefight that erupted when a North Korean security detail chased a defecting Soviet citizen (Vasily Matusak) across the MDL into the southern-controlled sector of the Joint Security Area.
November 1987: One South Korean killed on DMZ central sector by North Korean sniper fire.

1990s

May 1992: Three Northern soldiers in South Korean uniforms are killed in Cheolwon, Gangwon-do; three South Korean soldiers are wounded.
December 1994: North Koreans shoot down US Army helicopter. One US KIA and one US POW for 13 days.
May 1995: North Korean forces fire on a South Korean fishing boat, killing three.
October 1995: Two armed North Koreans are discovered at the Imjin River; one is killed.
April 1996: Several hundred armed North Korean troops cross repeatedly into the Demilitarized Zone.
May 1996: Seven Northern soldiers cross south of the Demilitarized Zone, but withdraw after warning shots are fired.
May & June 1996: North Korean vessels twice cross the Northern Limit Line and have a several-hour standoff with the South Korean navy.
April 1997: Five North Korean soldiers cross the Demilitarized Zone in Cheolwon, Gangwon-do, and fire on South Korean positions.
June 1997: Three North Korean vessels cross the Northern Limit Line and attack South Korean vessels two miles (3 km) south of the line. On land, fourteen North Korean soldiers cross 70 m south of the center of the DMZ, leading to a 23-minute exchange of fire.
June 1999: A series of clashes between North and South Korean vessels take place in the Yellow Sea

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#197117 Jul 30, 2014
2000s

2001: On twelve separate occasions, North Korean vessels cross the Northern Limit Line and then withdraw.
November 27, 2001: North and South Korean forces exchange fire without injuries.
June 29, 2002: Renewed naval clashes near the Northern Limit Line lead to the deaths of four South Korean sailors and the sinking of a South Korean vessel. The number of North Koreans killed is unknown.
November 16, 2002: South Korean forces fire warning shots on a Northern boat crossing the Northern Limit Line. The boat withdraws. The similar incident is repeated on November 20.
February 19, 2003: A North Korean fighter plane crosses seven miles (11 km) south of the Northern Limit Line, and returns north after being intercepted by six South Korean planes.
March 2, 2003: Four North Korean fighter jets intercept a US reconnaissance plane over the Sea of Japan.
July 17, 2003: North and South Korean forces exchange fire at the DMZ around 6 AM. The South Korean army reports four rounds fired from the North and seventeen from the South. No injuries are reported.[13]
November 1, 2004: North Korean vessels, claiming to be in pursuit of illegal fishing craft, cross the Northern Limit Line and are fired upon by the South. The vessels withdraw 3 hours later.
July 30, 2006: Several rounds are exchanged near a South Korean post in Yanggu, Gangwon.

Wikinews has related news: Korean navies exchange fire

November 10, 2009: Naval vessels from the two Koreas exchanged fire in the area of the NLL, reportedly causing serious damage to a North Korean patrol ship.[14] For more details of this incident, see Battle of Daecheong.

2010s

March 26, 2010: A South Korean naval vessel, the ROKS Cheonan, was allegedly sunk by a North Korean torpedo near Baengnyeong Island in the Yellow Sea. A rescue operation recovered 58 survivors but 46 sailors were killed. On May 20, 2010, a South Korean led international investigation group concluded that the sinking of the warship was in fact the result of a North Korean torpedo attack.[15][16] North Korea denied involvement.[17] The United Nations Security Council made a Presidential Statement condemning the attack but without identifying the attacker.[18]
November 23, 2010: North Korea fired artillery at South Korea's Greater Yeonpyeong island in the Yellow Sea and South Korea returned fire. Two South Korean marines and two South Korean civilians were killed, six were seriously wounded, and ten were treated for minor injuries. Approximately seventy South Korean houses were destroyed.[19][20][21] North Korean casualties were unknown, but Lee Hong-gi, the Director of Operations of the South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS), claimed that as a result of the South Korean retaliation "there may be a considerable number of North Korean casualties".[22]

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#197118 Jul 30, 2014
And Jacquaeau thinks the Korean War ended in 1953 too!

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#197119 Jul 30, 2014
This was another incident lost to history as it happened just a few months before North Korea invaded South Korea.

Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer - Spy Flight
www.spyflight.co.uk/priv.htm
The plan was for the aircraft to gather intelligence on Soviet naval activity along ... The Russians eventually admitted that they had shot down the aircraft, which ...
http://www.spyflight.co.uk/priv.htm

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#197120 Jul 30, 2014
Axe murder incident
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The axe murder incident ( literally, Panmunjom ax murder incident) was the killing of two United States Army officers by North Korean soldiers on August 18, 1976, in the Joint Security Area (JSA) located in the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). The U.S. Army officers had been part of a work party cutting down a poplar tree in the JSA.

Three days later, the U.S. and South Korea launched Operation Paul Bunyan, an operation that combined a return to cut down the tree with a show of force to intimidate North Korea into backing down. North Korea then accepted responsibility for the earlier killings.

The incident is also known as the hatchet incident, the poplar tree incident, and "The Tree Trimming Incident."

“Bonjour Hello Buongiorno Hola”

Since: Feb 12

Ottawa

#197121 Jul 30, 2014
wojar wrote:
<quoted text>With proxy servers you can "be" in as many places you please at the same time.
Well deduced.

Was not Rush using that "proxy" thing, word, all the time? And the language, the profanity, the "gay" parlance, the filth... Just wonderin'

“Bonjour Hello Buongiorno Hola”

Since: Feb 12

Ottawa

#197122 Jul 30, 2014
Rogue Scholar 05 wrote:
<quoted text>
1) Yep, EVERYONE that lived in Iraq while Saddamn was in power was, for all practices purposes, a slave. Just like Soviet Russia!!!
2) No US casualties in and around South Korea since 1953? That is not hard to shoot holes in. In 1969 we had 31 Americans killed by North Korea alone!!!
<quoted text>
3) But they could not practice their Christian faith either. No cross allowed on the outside of your church nor the inside. Caught with a Bible, EXECUTED!
4)***
5) So Saddamn did not have them crucified. Just a bullet in the back of the head is all. And you are okay with that too!!!
6) And Carter was the ONLY devout Christian? Reagan and both Bushs are too!
1. Were they? More than in your ally's Saudi Arabia? They were no more slaves than any middle eastern country. Tell that to the "guest" workers from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Philippines in S. Arabia, the Emirates etc. As I said, Iraq was one of the rare secular states in the region and one of the most prosperous for individuals. No one argues Hussein was a cruel tyrant who tortured and killed his opposition though it was based on power alone, not religious;

2. Sorry, yes , there have been U.S. casualties. But please give us a breakdown as to "battle" casualties and training and accidental casualties and suicides whilst in uniform. Since the truce in 1953, how do those casualties compare to Iraq and Afghanistan and costs please;

3.Yes, that's the whole point, Christians/Catholics DID practice their faith and yes , crosses and crucifixes were allowed inside the churches, though I'll believe you when you say they were not allowed outside. Executed for being caught with a Bible? No,that's in S.Arabia,Rogue, your trusted and democratic ally, not secular Iraq. Or else, prove it. You can't 'cuz it's not true. Oh, yes, today, indeed;

4.......

5. Who said anything about "crucified"? I mentioned "crucifixes" outside the church, or crosses. Don't get "crossed" up LOL. As to bullets behind the head, yes, and that is unacceptable in any society. But Saddam killed far less than what has been going on since then. Invasion was a mistake, a sad and costly one, one of GWB's worst booboos apart from his economic meltdown. Can you really say that things have improved in Iraq since the invasion and occupation? Removal of Saddam, the tyrant we knew, was repeated, yes, repeated just a few years later, Obama's snafu, the removal of Ghadaffi. Look at Libya 5 years ago, the dregs. Look at Libya today, a living-dying hell, much worse than Ghadaffi's regime;.

6. Carter, yes, was the only sincere Christian. Still is.Devout is your word. Only Carter knows if he is devout. But sincere, yes, as proven time and time again. Reagan and the Bush family were, are, token Christians and went to church to attract voters. Period.

“Bonjour Hello Buongiorno Hola”

Since: Feb 12

Ottawa

#197123 Jul 30, 2014
Rogue Scholar 05 wrote:
List of border incidents involving North Korea
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The following is a partial list of border incidents involving North Korea since the Korean Armistice Agreement of July 27, 1953, ended large scale military action of the Korean War. Most of these incidents took place near either the Korean Demilitarized Zone or the Northern Limit Line. This list includes engagements on land, air, and sea, but does not include alleged incursions and terrorist incidents that occurred away from the border.
Many of the incidents occurring at sea are due to border disputes. In 1977 North Korea claimed an Exclusive Economic Zone over a large area south of the disputed western maritime border, the Northern Limit Line in the Yellow Sea.[1] This is a prime fishing area, particularly for crabs, and clashes commonly occur. According to the 5 January 2011 Korea Herald, since July 1953 North Korea has violated the armistice 221 times, including 26 military attacks
1950s
16 February 1958: North Korean agents hijack a South Korean airliner to Pyongyang en route from Pusan to Seoul; 1 American pilot, 1 American passenger, 2 West German passengers, and 24 other passengers were released in early March, but 8 other passengers remained in the North.[3]
1960s
1964: North Korea creates an underground group: Revolution Party for Reunification, this group is ground down and eliminated by South Korean authorities by 1969 [4]
April 27, 1965: Two North Korean MiG-17s attack a United States EC-121 Warning Star reconnaissance plane above the Sea of Japan, 80 km (50 mi) from the North Korean shore. The aircraft was damaged, but managed to land at Yokota Air Base, Japan.[5][6]
January 17, 1968: In an incident known as the Blue House Raid, a 31-man detachment from the Korean People's Army secretly crosses the DMZ on a mission to kill South Korean President Park Chung-hee on January 21, nearly succeeding. The incursion was discovered after South Korean civilians confronted the North Koreans and informed the authorities. After entering Seoul disguised as South Korean soldiers, the North Koreans attempt to enter the Blue House (the official residence of the President of South Korea). The North Koreans are confronted by South Korean police and a firefight ensued. The North Koreans fled Seoul and individually attempted to cross the DMZ back to North Korea. Of the original group of 31 North Koreans, 28 were killed, one was captured, and two are unaccounted for. Additionally, 68 South Koreans were killed and 66 were wounded, the majority of whom were soldiers and police officers. Three American soldiers were also killed and three were wounded.[7]
January 23, 1968: The United States Naval ship the USS Pueblo is boarded and captured, along with its crew, by North Korean forces in the Sea of Japan. The entire crew of 83 is captured, with the exception of one sailor killed in the initial attack on the vessel, and the vessel was taken to a North Korean port. All the captives were released on December 23 of the same year via the Bridge of No Return at the DMZ. The USS Pueblo is still in North Korean possession and is docked in Pyongyang and is on display as a museum ship.[8]
From March 1968 and March 1969, various military skirmishes took place in the Paektusan region between the North Korean and Chinese armed forces.[9]
October 30, 1968: From October 30 to November 2, 120 to 130 North Korean commandos land on the northeast shore of South Korea, allegedly to establish a base in order to wage a guerrilla war against the South Korean government. A total of 110 to 113 were killed, seven were captured, and 13 escaped. Around 20 South Korean civilians, law enforcement officers, and soldiers were killed.[6][10]
v

Er, Rogue, all that verbiage to announce that 4 American servicemen ( 5 too many, I agree). Four,. That's it, in 61 years?

“Bonjour Hello Buongiorno Hola”

Since: Feb 12

Ottawa

#197124 Jul 30, 2014
Rogue Scholar 05 wrote:
March 1969: Six North Korean commandos kill a South Korean police officer near Jumunjin, Gangwon-do. Seven American soldiers are killed in a North Korean attack along the DMZ.[11]
April 1969: An EC-121, US reconnaissance plane is shot down 90 miles (140 km) east of the North Korean coast, leaving 31 dead.
November 1969: Four US soldiers are killed by North Koreans in the Demilitarized Zone.
December 11, 1969: North Korean agent Cho Ch'ang-h&#468;i hijacked a Korean Air Lines YS-11 flying from Gangneung Airbase in Gangneung, Gangwon-do to Gimpo International Airport in Seoul. It was carrying four crewmembers and 46 passengers (excluding Cho); 39 of the passengers were returned two months later, but the crew and seven passengers remained in North Korea. The aircraft was damaged beyond repair on landing.
1970s
April 1970: In Geumchon, a region of Paju south of the DMZ, a clash leaves three North Korean soldiers dead and five South Korean soldiers wounded.
June 1970: The North Korean navy seizes a broadcast vessel from the South near the Northern Limit Line. 20 crew are captured.
February 1974: Two South Korean fishing vessels are sunk and 30 crew detained by the North.
1974: The first tunnel into ROK is discovered (the three following tunnels were found in 1975, 1978, 1990)[12]
June 1976: An incursion south of the DMZ in Gangwon-do leaves three dead from the North and six from the South.
August 18, 1976: The Axe murder incident -- an attempt to clear brush in the Demilitarized Zone near Panmunjom ends with two US soldiers dead.
October 1979: Three North Koreans enter the eastern DMZ. One is killed.
December 1979: One US Army soldier killed, three US soldiers wounded after stumbling into a North Korean minefield in a heavy fog while patrolling DMZ. One body is recovered from the North Koreans five days later.
1980s
March 1980: Three North Koreans are killed while trying to cross the Han River estuary.
May 1980: North Koreans engage OP Ouillette on DMZ in firefight. One North Korean WIA.
March 1981: Three North Koreans try to enter the South in Geumhwa-eup, Cheorwon, Gangwon-do; one is killed.
July 1981: Three North Koreans are killed trying to cross the Imjin River to the South.
November 1984: Nine North Korean soldiers and one South Korean soldier die, and one American soldier is wounded during the firefight that erupted when a North Korean security detail chased a defecting Soviet citizen (Vasily Matusak) across the MDL into the southern-controlled sector of the Joint Security Area.
November 1987: One South Korean killed on DMZ central sector by North Korean sniper fire.
1990s
May 1992: Three Northern soldiers in South Korean uniforms are killed in Cheolwon, Gangwon-do; three South Korean soldiers are wounded.
December 1994: North Koreans shoot down US Army helicopter. One US KIA and one US POW for 13 days.
May 1995: North Korean forces fire on a South Korean fishing boat, killing three.
October 1995: Two armed North Koreans are discovered at the Imjin River; one is killed.
April 1996: Several hundred armed North Korean troops cross repeatedly into the Demilitarized Zone.
May 1996: Seven Northern soldiers cross south of the Demilitarized Zone, but withdraw after warning shots are fired.
May & June 1996: North Korean vessels twice cross the Northern Limit Line and have a several-hour standoff with the South Korean navy.
April 1997: Five North Korean soldiers cross the Demilitarized Zone in Cheolwon, Gangwon-do, and fire on South Korean positions.
June 1997: Three North Korean vessels cross the Northern Limit Line and attack South Korean vessels two miles (3 km) south of the line. On land, fourteen North Korean soldiers cross 70 m south of the center of the DMZ, leading to a 23-minute exchange of fire.
35 killed, 61 years. Too many. Still, how does that compare with Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan? And even Granada?

“Facts trump speculation”

Since: Dec 08

Bristol, CT

#197125 Jul 30, 2014
Dale wrote:
<quoted text>LMAO!!! Dick, so you do agree we are different people. LMAO!!!
Soory Dufus.

Neither twin understands sarcasm either.
wojar wrote:
<quoted text>
<quoted text>
Now which twin always always put the LMAO at the beginning and which always always always put it at the end?
Hahahahahahahahahahahahaha!
wojar

Newington, CT

#197126 Jul 30, 2014
Sorry, my typing sucks before 8 am

“Bonjour Hello Buongiorno Hola”

Since: Feb 12

Ottawa

#197127 Jul 30, 2014
Rogue :

"April 1969: An EC-121, US reconnaissance plane is shot down 90 miles (140 km) east of the North Korean coast, leaving 31 dead.
November 1969: Four US soldiers are killed by North Koreans in the Demilitarized Zone."

It happened, and so unfortunate, though we'll never kinow if the EC-11 was over territorial waters or not. FYI, I'd rather take the U,.S,'s word for it that the EC-11 was NOT over N.Korean territorial waters.

Having said that, I wonder what you think of Nixon's reaction, which was NOTHING. Had Obama or Carter been in charge, would you have called them wusses?

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#197128 Jul 30, 2014
Even Jimmy Carter's relatives distance themselves from him.

Jimmy Carter's grandson keeps distance from former president as he bids for US office
Jason Carter, who is running for governor of Georgia in bid to form latest US political dynasty, criticised for accepting grandfather's fund-raising despite distancing himself from ex-president's views on ...... Israel .....and ........ death penalty
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/nor...

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#197129 Jul 30, 2014
While the Atlanta Urinal and Constipation tries to spin it a little differently.

Jimmy Carter calls role in his grandson’s campaign ‘minimal’
http://www.ajc.com/news/news/state-regional-g...

“On Deck”

Since: Aug 08

French Polynesia

#197130 Jul 30, 2014
Jacques,
Jane Byrne was right when she called the Chicago City council an evil cabal.
She was 'da mare' back in the 70's

O'Hare is their cash cow, yet Chicago gouges everyone who lives and visits the city.
The economies of scale should dictate otherwise.
When I visit Chicago I spend not one thin dime there unless it's for concert tickets.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#197132 Jul 30, 2014
Jacques from Ottawa wrote:
Rogue :
"April 1969: An EC-121, US reconnaissance plane is shot down 90 miles (140 km) east of the North Korean coast, leaving 31 dead.
November 1969: Four US soldiers are killed by North Koreans in the Demilitarized Zone."
It happened, and so unfortunate, though we'll never kinow if the EC-11 was over territorial waters or not. FYI, I'd rather take the U,.S,'s word for it that the EC-11 was NOT over N.Korean territorial waters.
Having said that, I wonder what you think of Nixon's reaction, which was NOTHING. Had Obama or Carter been in charge, would you have called them wusses?
Does "90 miles east" mean anything to you? Have you ever heard of the "12-mile" rule recognized by the U.N.?
Ah, Nixon was a PROGRESSIVE and he did order extensive bombing over North Vietnam and ordered the mining of Haiphong Harbor too so I would not call him a wimp.
And you probably have no idea what "SIGENT" is? It is Signal Intelligence which you do not nee to over fly an area to gather radio/radar signals. But is nice if you can get away from other sources of radio signals like over SOUTH Korea so being over open water is GOOD for SIGENT work. I wonder how I know things like that?
Oh, you miss typed "EC-11" twice.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#197133 Jul 30, 2014
During the Israeli-Syrian Air War of 1983 we found out through SIGENT that the Soviet ZSU-23-4 had TWO radar modes. We knew about one but what we did not know was that was only used in training. When they went in the combat mode they switched radar signals to one that was not detected on our AN/APR-39 radar warning device carried in our aircraft.
Because of our SIGENT we were able to fix our AN/APR-39s so our aircraft were better protected.
Hummmm, and just how would I know that? Could I have been a COMSEC Account holder with Fort Huachuca, AZ. You do know what they do at Fort Huachuca, don't you? You probably have never heard of the place!!!
Been there, done that!!!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Huachuca
Oh, if you ever saw the film 'Flight of the Intruder' you would have seen a ZSU-23-4 in operation.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZSU-23-4

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