Comments
21 - 40 of 81 Comments Last updated Apr 27, 2013
animaniactoo

New York, NY

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#21
Apr 26, 2013
 
j_m_w wrote:
<quoted text>
My point is why do kids at the ages of 11 and 14 need a sitter at all?
The 14 y.o. probably doesn't need a sitter, but the 11 y.o. does. And mom probably doesn't feel safe leaving the 14 y.o. home alone for as many hours in a row as it would need to be.

“Colorful Beyond Words”

Since: May 11

"True Love Never Ends "

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#22
Apr 26, 2013
 
squishymama wrote:
Lw1: Leave his a$$ at home watching TV and go do the things you want.
Lw2: Turn off the effing TV.
Lw3: Consignment shop.
Great Answers across the board.

Team Squishymama :)

“The two baby belly, please!”

Since: Sep 09

Evanston IL

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#23
Apr 26, 2013
 
j_m_w wrote:
<quoted text>
My point is why do kids at the ages of 11 and 14 need a sitter at all?
Oh.

Well, considering how these children behave, can we realistically believe that the older one would behave in any type of responsible way?

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#24
Apr 26, 2013
 
I don't think the 11yo needs a sitter simply because she's 11. I was home alone for hours by age 9 or 10 (on weekends). Nick's 11yo stays home alone when he's sick from school.(he faked it recently, and his mom did a surprise lunchhour check and found him on the internet (against the rules), on her laptop (against the rules), and he was surrounded by food wrappers and packages -- he'd eaten all the kid-friendly snacks in the house.

He's grounded big time.

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#25
Apr 26, 2013
 
squishymama wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh.
Well, considering how these children behave, can we realistically believe that the older one would behave in any type of responsible way?
True. And the 11yo may be fine on her own, but the sisters push each other's buttons.

“Colorful Beyond Words”

Since: May 11

"True Love Never Ends "

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#26
Apr 26, 2013
 

Judged:

1

My oldest was 15 before I left her home alone and the youngest was 10. But before we allowed that...we taught them how to use handguns. Too much violence, home invasions ... meaness in the world not to teach your kids some type of self defense.( before then ... kids enjoyed staying with my sister who only lives about 1/2 mile away.)

911 is ok ..but we live in more rural area and it could take too long for officers to arrive.

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#27
Apr 26, 2013
 

Judged:

1

Hatti_Hollerand wrote:
My oldest was 15 before I left her home alone and the youngest was 10. But before we allowed that...we taught them how to use handguns. Too much violence, home invasions ... meaness in the world not to teach your kids some type of self defense.( before then ... kids enjoyed staying with my sister who only lives about 1/2 mile away.)
911 is ok ..but we live in more rural area and it could take too long for officers to arrive.
That is way too overprotective for me. 15?

“The two baby belly, please!”

Since: Sep 09

Evanston IL

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#28
Apr 26, 2013
 
RedheadwGlasses wrote:
<quoted text>
True. And the 11yo may be fine on her own, but the sisters push each other's buttons.
It's not like I don't think it can't be done. I just don't think these sibs have been, for lack of a better word, trained for it.

“A Programmer is not in IT!”

Since: Feb 09

Neda, stay with me!

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#29
Apr 26, 2013
 

Judged:

1

Yeah but she taught them how to use firearms! Thats empowerment!
RedheadwGlasses wrote:
<quoted text>
That is way too overprotective for me. 15?

“FD&S is no way to be.”

Since: Feb 13

United States

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#30
Apr 26, 2013
 
1. "Get over it" is not an acceptable response. Tell him you are going to do what you want to do, and he can be a part of it or he can hear about it later. Then either you guys come together or grow apart and move on. Bottom line, you have to do what you have to do to be happy, and your spouse should be supportive. Otherwise, isn't it kind of a sign that you're not a good match?

2. First, the fact taht you can't figure this out shows you shouldn't be a parent. Second, tell them they either take turns or come to some other agreement OR THEY CAN GET OFF THEIR BUTTS AND DO SOMETHING BESIDES WATCH TV.

3. Ebay or Craigslist.
animaniactoo

New York, NY

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31
Apr 26, 2013
 
RedheadwGlasses wrote:
I don't think the 11yo needs a sitter simply because she's 11. I was home alone for hours by age 9 or 10 (on weekends). Nick's 11yo stays home alone when he's sick from school.(he faked it recently, and his mom did a surprise lunchhour check and found him on the internet (against the rules), on her laptop (against the rules), and he was surrounded by food wrappers and packages -- he'd eaten all the kid-friendly snacks in the house.
He's grounded big time.
Depends on the kid, depends on the situation. I think most 11 year olds will not handle so many hours on their own well, and that it's about the age where they should start being eased into it and having to prove to both themselves and their parents that they can handle it.
Kuuipo

Monterey, CA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#32
Apr 26, 2013
 
LW1: Horrible answer from Abby. People over 40 can and do go out and have fun. LW should plan a night out every week. She can take a class, have dinner and a movie, enjoy live music, go to an art gallery, etc. She should go with or without the husband.

LW2: What Sam said.

LW3: I have the same problem. I have a hard time getting rid of things that people have given me. My solution is to keep and display gifts for a while and then redecorate. That way, I feel as though I have honored the person who gave the gift. I don't think a garage sale would be wrong. If a person happens to see their item for sale, tell them that you have enjoyed it, but you need to raise money.

“reign in blood”

Since: May 09

Braidwood, IL

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#33
Apr 26, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Sam I Am GEAM wrote:
1. "Get over it" is not an acceptable response. Tell him you are going to do what you want to do, and he can be a part of it or he can hear about it later. Then either you guys come together or grow apart and move on. Bottom line, you have to do what you have to do to be happy, and your spouse should be supportive. Otherwise, isn't it kind of a sign that you're not a good match?
Her husband is right, this IS her life now. She's nearly 40 and she want's to relive what she's missed out on in her teenage years?? What, does she want to hang out at the mall and go to Justin Beiber concerts? She does need to "get over it," this is the life she chose.

“FD&S is no way to be.”

Since: Feb 13

United States

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#34
Apr 26, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

1

edogxxx wrote:
<quoted text>
Her husband is right, this IS her life now. She's nearly 40 and she want's to relive what she's missed out on in her teenage years?? What, does she want to hang out at the mall and go to Justin Beiber concerts? She does need to "get over it," this is the life she chose.
Wrong, dum dum. She was supposed to know that her husband was going to sit on his butt and do nothing? Any blame is at least as much on him as on her. He knew he was marrying someone much younger. She obviously has much more energy than he does, at a minimum he should not try to hold her back, and reasonably he should make an effort to do SOMETHING with her SOME of the time. She definitely should not let him hold her back.

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#35
Apr 26, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

LW1's husband should get on board with his wife, because she's going to start doing stuff without him (because he wants to stay home), and then they'll start to grow apart, she'll meet ufn new friends, probably a single/divorced guy or two....

Lw1's husband: If you can't beat 'em, join 'em.
pde

Schaumburg, IL

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#36
Apr 26, 2013
 
animaniactoo wrote:
<quoted text>
The 14 y.o. probably doesn't need a sitter, but the 11 y.o. does. And mom probably doesn't feel safe leaving the 14 y.o. home alone for as many hours in a row as it would need to be.
I was babysitting at age 11. And the Red Cross still allows 11-year-olds to take their babysitting classes.
pde

Schaumburg, IL

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#37
Apr 26, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Sam I Am GEAM wrote:
<quoted text>
Wrong, dum dum. She was supposed to know that her husband was going to sit on his butt and do nothing? Any blame is at least as much on him as on her. He knew he was marrying someone much younger. She obviously has much more energy than he does, at a minimum he should not try to hold her back, and reasonably he should make an effort to do SOMETHING with her SOME of the time. She definitely should not let him hold her back.
If she's not even 40 yet, he's in his mid or late 40s.

He's just a lazy bump on the log.
pde

Schaumburg, IL

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#38
Apr 26, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

1

The problem with Lw1 is that she isn't defining what she wants to DO.

If she wants to go back to school, is he going to stop her from signing up for classes at their local community college? Getting involved in adult theater or music programs?

She's got a high school student, there's still plenty of stuff she can involved with as a mom via that. Why isn't she doing that?

If she wants to travel ... she's got a college student, a high school student, and summer. Plan trips during the summer involving the two of them and the bump on the log can stay home if he wants.

“Colorful Beyond Words”

Since: May 11

"True Love Never Ends "

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#39
Apr 26, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

RedheadwGlasses wrote:
<quoted text>
That is way too overprotective for me. 15?
The critical thinking skills of kids are in no way developed enough to handle a major emergency or crisis. At least older teenagers 15 and older have a better chance of making a life saving decision for themselves and for any other kids that may be in the home.

I guess it really is all in where you set your standards and values. Different in every family.

“On Deck”

Since: Aug 08

French Polynesia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#40
Apr 26, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

1

L1. The guy sounds like a couch potato to me.
I haven't watched TV in years and don't even own one any longer. Some of my friends don't watch TV anymore either because of my inspiration.
Life is good and TV is not.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Type in your comments below
Name
(appears on your post)
Comments
Characters left: 4000
Type the numbers you see in the image on the right:

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

25 Users are viewing the Chicago Forum right now

Search the Chicago Forum:
Title Updated Last By Comments
Topix Chitown Regulars (Aug '09) 4 min edogxxx 97,541
Abby 7-26 7 min edogxxx 1
Amy 7-26 9 min edogxxx 1
Barack Obama, our next President (Nov '08) 31 min GUESS we 1,080,447
BARACK OBAMA BIRTH CERTIFICATE: Suit contesting... (Jan '09) 1 hr wojar 174,671
Israeli troops begin Gaza pullout as Hamas decl... (Jan '09) 2 hr Uzi 67,977
Once slow-moving threat, global warming speeds ... (Dec '08) 2 hr Brian_G 45,799
•••
•••
•••
Chicago Dating

more search filters

less search filters

•••

Chicago Jobs

•••
Enter and win $5000
•••
•••

Chicago People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

•••

Chicago News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Chicago
•••

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]
•••