Patients Looking For Somnomed MAS, Somnodent MAS, TAP Appliances,...

Jul 25, 2009 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Press Release News From 24-7 Press Release

GURNEE, IL, July 25, 2009 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Dental Sleep Medicine is rapidly becoming a major player in the treatment of sleep apnea.

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1 - 9 of 9 Comments Last updated Nov 27, 2013
Ugerth

Central Point, OR

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#1
Aug 11, 2009
 
My CPAP works pretty well, but not great, for me (mild apnea + insomnia), but I travel often and a dental appliance would be so much simpler and may work better (by not awakening me late at night). So I tried a dental appliance.

In short: big, expensive mistake.

• Most “sleep doctors” are CPAP peddlers. It’s all they know. The dental appliance physician has to train the sleep doctor and sleep techs how to sleep-test the product.
• The very experienced and very cooperative sleep techs at my previous sleep lab (I changed labs because that sleep doc is useless) told me they had tested many such appliances, and not one patient had any success with them.
• Most insurers won’t pay for these dental appliances because they don’t work.
• I interviewed a few dentists who sell these appliances, and chose one who specializes in jaw medicine and sells a high-end device called the Somnomed MAS.
• Against most advice (the studies supporting this concept are very small), I bit the bullet and bought an appliance as a gamble (there are no guarantees). As a lean male with mild apnea, I was a great candidate for this approach.

My Somnomed is very sleek; I barely notice it in my mouth. It grabs all my teeth, not just the front ones, so should not alter my bite. It lets me talk, sip water, yawn, move my jaw, etc., and remains comfortable all night. If any such device is going to work, I figured, this one should, and this dentist is extremely knowledgeable in the physiology of the jaw and throat and the mechanisms of how apnea affects atherosclerosis. He accompanied me to the sleep study to make sure the sleep doc and techs properly fine-tuned the device to optimize my breathing. The objective is to titrate the jaw extension to maximum apnea prevention by repeatedly advancing the jaw, counting apnea events and pulse oxygen in the next sleep session, and repeating, all night. Analysis of the data should then tell the docs what amount of jaw extension best relieves the apnea.

There were just two problems:
1. It didn’t do squat for my apnea … virtually no effect whatsoever at any jaw extension.
2. My jaw still hurts 30 days after the max-advancement phase of the sleep study, and I haven’t even seen the device since the study. If my jaw pain doesn’t subside soon, I will call that dentist next week and have him fix my jaw at his expense.

What did my out-of-pocket $2,500 for my dental appliance buy me? A sore jaw and a pair of paperweights.
Rick

Minneapolis, MN

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#2
Sep 3, 2009
 
Ugerth wrote:
My CPAP works pretty well, but not great, for me (mild apnea + insomnia), but I travel often and a dental appliance would be so much simpler and may work better (by not awakening me late at night). So I tried a dental appliance.
In short: big, expensive mistake.
• Most “sleep doctors” are CPAP peddlers. It’s all they know. The dental appliance physician has to train the sleep doctor and sleep techs how to sleep-test the product.
• The very experienced and very cooperative sleep techs at my previous sleep lab (I changed labs because that sleep doc is useless) told me they had tested many such appliances, and not one patient had any success with them.
• Most insurers won’t pay for these dental appliances because they don’t work.
• I interviewed a few dentists who sell these appliances, and chose one who specializes in jaw medicine and sells a high-end device called the Somnomed MAS.
• Against most advice (the studies supporting this concept are very small), I bit the bullet and bought an appliance as a gamble (there are no guarantees). As a lean male with mild apnea, I was a great candidate for this approach.
My Somnomed is very sleek; I barely notice it in my mouth. It grabs all my teeth, not just the front ones, so should not alter my bite. It lets me talk, sip water, yawn, move my jaw, etc., and remains comfortable all night. If any such device is going to work, I figured, this one should, and this dentist is extremely knowledgeable in the physiology of the jaw and throat and the mechanisms of how apnea affects atherosclerosis. He accompanied me to the sleep study to make sure the sleep doc and techs properly fine-tuned the device to optimize my breathing. The objective is to titrate the jaw extension to maximum apnea prevention by repeatedly advancing the jaw, counting apnea events and pulse oxygen in the next sleep session, and repeating, all night. Analysis of the data should then tell the docs what amount of jaw extension best relieves the apnea.
There were just two problems:
1. It didn’t do squat for my apnea … virtually no effect whatsoever at any jaw extension.
2. My jaw still hurts 30 days after the max-advancement phase of the sleep study, and I haven’t even seen the device since the study. If my jaw pain doesn’t subside soon, I will call that dentist next week and have him fix my jaw at his expense.
What did my out-of-pocket $2,500 for my dental appliance buy me? A sore jaw and a pair of paperweights.
I have the same problem since I am on the road a lot it was cumbersome to carry my cpap with me. I decided to investigate other machines and discovered on Cpap.com a machine that weighs 1.5# and is much smaller that the original equipment. I had seen this unit in a med. store for 1250.00 but on line it was only 350.00. You have to send them your prescription for setting the machine, but I have had it for several years. It is made by one of the noted companies and I have had no problems with it.
Jean

Ashland, VA

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#3
Oct 15, 2009
 
I too could not tolerate the CPAP with mild to moderate sleep apnea. My doctor said if I sleep on my side I would not snore or have interrupted breathing. I have always slept on my back and trying to sleep on my side has caused neck pain and shoulder tension..but it works.

Now to the $2000 Somnomed that I decided to try so I could sleep on my back when I want to or need to. I tried the top part for 4 days and had mild tooth pain. Then I took the plung and tried the appliance. For 8 days I had the worst head ache I have ever had in my life. My doctor put me on Flexerol to relax the muscles in my head as they were all tied in knots. I also have TMJ, fibromyalgia as well as sleep apnea. Just a quick search showed me that someone with TMJ should never have their jaw extended like this device does.
I have been back to my dentist who made the imprint to make the device. She said to just give it a rest for now. The TMJ and fibromyalgia may be a factor but should not cause the muscle head ache I had.

Anyone want a very slightly used CPAP? I offer up the very expensive dental appliance but then it has to fit your teeth. After we write the check for $2000 I am going to throw it under a large lawn mower!

My dentist was not qualified to agree to make this appliance for me as she did not take into account my other health conditons. My insurance has already written this off with $0. If you are going to try this appliance do your research, find a qualified dentist to make the impression and fit the device and be prepared for a lot of tooth sensitivity and head aches.
norcal

Rocklin, CA

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#4
Oct 2, 2010
 
I too bith the bullet and tried Somnomed. A chronic snorer with a hangover type feeling everyday found relief. I literally cannot sleep without this thing now. It has worked wonders for me. Yes it is expensive and it wasn't covered by my insurance. But it is the only thing I tried that has worked short of surgery. I couldn't muster up the gall to do surgery. My jaws were sore for the first couple of months, but it has subsided and I have used this appliance for two years now.
gmc

Hayward, CA

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#5
Jan 17, 2012
 
norcal wrote:
I too bith the bullet and tried Somnomed. A chronic snorer with a hangover type feeling everyday found relief. I literally cannot sleep without this thing now. It has worked wonders for me. Yes it is expensive and it wasn't covered by my insurance. But it is the only thing I tried that has worked short of surgery. I couldn't muster up the gall to do surgery. My jaws were sore for the first couple of months, but it has subsided and I have used this appliance for two years now.
Nocal, I am in process of purchasing the somnomed device. Do you have any more advice. Dentist is one of two that were recommended in our area by SOMNOMED. Thanks, gmc
ja4edi

Reno, NV

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#6
Jan 19, 2012
 
gmc wrote:
<quoted text>
Nocal, I am in process of purchasing the somnomed device. Do you have any more advice. Dentist is one of two that were recommended in our area by SOMNOMED. Thanks, gmc
Look for a Fellow or Diplomat of the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine if you want the most qualified dentist in your area. Ask how many Sleep appliances they have done and for references from patients they have treated and if they work collaboratively with your Sleep Physician. Also ask how they handle any side effects and make sure they have done a TMJ check to insure that your jaw joints are stable. Somnodent is one of the best appliances out there and they work very well for most patients with mild to moderate sleep apnea.
Mark

Phoenix, AZ

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#7
May 18, 2012
 
I have moderate to serious apnea and cannot sleep witht the CPAP Machine. The sleep tech said he never saw anyone lay there for that many hours awake. It was like a fight. I would love to sleep better and to prove to the FAA that my apnea is under control, but have no idea what to do. I have an appointment with my dentist,(need a cleaning anyway) who does not sell the somnomed. He does sell something, but they want 600 up front but will advocate for insurance payment.
I will take any advice available.
wow!
chris

Sydney, Australia

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#8
Sep 10, 2012
 
hi, I am also a lean male, mid-30's, with mild-moderate apnea.
I didn't want a CPAP machine since I travel, hike and camp a lot, so investigated other options including MAS and surgery.

I tried the Somnomed and what a difference it made! My wife was pleased that I didn't snore, and the sleep study showed virtually no apnea (it took me about 6 months to get used to the device - I eventually went to 9mm extension).

Note: the acrylic is quite delicate, I had mine for 5 years and dropped it about 2 weeks ago and it SHATTERED! My dentist did the impression, has ordered a new one and I should get it next week.
(there goes $1800!)

In the meanwhile, my snoring and apnea have come back and I really feel the difference now (yukky mouth, tired etc)

My dentist tells me that you should see a sleep specialist first - Somnomed only works for moderate apnea with a particular throat geometry issues.
Don't expect miracles if you have severe apnea, he was honest enough to tell me that it won't work for severe.
Paul

Toronto, Canada

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#9
Nov 27, 2013
 
I have the Somnomed appliance and it works great for me. I have had absolutely no issues since I began using it two months ago. It is comfortable and now that I have adjusted it fourteen turns, I no longer snore, even on my back. I have not had any mouth or jaw pain either. I know I don't snore because I have been recording my sleep with a highly-sensitive professional microphone and can hear and see on a time-line every noise that occurs in my room while sleeping. I am sleeping through the night and feel incredibly refreshed and energized in the morning and stay feeling great through the day. I really did not want to go the CPAP route. Sounds like a nightmare to me. In my opinion it is worth trying the Somnomed. I paid $2,600 including all the doctor's fees and follow-up sessions. My insurer reimbursed me $1,600. Better than nothing. And now, quite frankly, I would still happily have paid the full $2,600 myself knowing how much it has changed my life. If your insurer turns you down the first time, try again. Let them know that although this is a dental device it is being used to treat a medical condition. Most will pay when that is made clear.

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