Scientists say they have proved climate change is real, now mus...

Full story: Hartford Courant

Scientists studying the changing nature of the Earth's climate say they have completed one crucial task - proving beyond a doubt that global warming is real.
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“See how you are?”

Since: Jul 12

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#7388
Dec 19, 2012
 
DillinghamLawFirm wrote:
<quoted text>
The Eco-Boost engines are marvels of technology. Most people don't need V-8 or even V-6 power. What they require is 0-60 acceleration and excellent fuel economy. Much of today's upper end power is simply wasted and of no use for commuters.
Except for those applications requiring towing power, I see the V-8 engine as a dying power-plant. Even Jeep is producing a small-block, direct injection diesel engine for its Grand Cherokee next year.
I agree with your assessment that the power train needs to be balanced to the needs of the vehicle, and the vehicle should be tailored to its usage.
However, marvel of technology? Granted, the Eco-Boost is more efficient than others, but it's still the same basic technology we've been using for decades.

Since: Dec 12

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#7389
Dec 19, 2012
 
ChromiuMan wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree with your assessment that the power train needs to be balanced to the needs of the vehicle, and the vehicle should be tailored to its usage.
However, marvel of technology? Granted, the Eco-Boost is more efficient than others, but it's still the same basic technology we've been using for decades.
It is, though, a quantum leap forward. It produces more usable power than many older V-8 engines and is far more efficient. Witness even the V-6 power-plant in the new Mustangs: More power and far more fuel economy than many of the old GTs and Cobras. My first car was a 1968 Firebird with a 400 HP engine. It was a heavy, fuel-sucking monster. It could burn my rear 50s, but it only got 12 MPG, and it could pass almost anything but a gas station. It was also unreliable and unsafe by today's standards. The new V-6 Mustang would eat its lunch.

If I wanted my 1968 back, then I'd buy a 2013 Camaro. Same basic style and all of today's benefits. We need improvements, but they continue to come.

Now, create an all-electric Corvette--the fabled "Cor-Volt"--and I'm standing in line for the convertible model.

“See how you are?”

Since: Jul 12

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#7390
Dec 19, 2012
 
DillinghamLawFirm wrote:
<quoted text>
It is, though, a quantum leap forward. It produces more usable power than many older V-8 engines and is far more efficient. Witness even the V-6 power-plant in the new Mustangs: More power and far more fuel economy than many of the old GTs and Cobras. My first car was a 1968 Firebird with a 400 HP engine. It was a heavy, fuel-sucking monster. It could burn my rear 50s, but it only got 12 MPG, and it could pass almost anything but a gas station. It was also unreliable and unsafe by today's standards. The new V-6 Mustang would eat its lunch.
If I wanted my 1968 back, then I'd buy a 2013 Camaro. Same basic style and all of today's benefits. We need improvements, but they continue to come.
Now, create an all-electric Corvette--the fabled "Cor-Volt"--and I'm standing in line for the convertible model.
I wasn't dissing the technological refinements. I was just meaning that at the end of the day, it is still a turbocharged gasoline injected reciprocating piston engine.
PHD

Bertram, TX

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#7391
Dec 19, 2012
 

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Two versions of the rarely ordered in-line six-cylinder engine were available on the 1968 Pontiac Firebird: The 175- and 215-horsepower 250-cubic-inch engines with torque ratings of 240 and 255 foot-pounds, respectively. The more common engine was the 265-horsepower 350 V-8 with 355 foot-pounds of torque and a two-barrel carburetor, but buyers could also order the 320-horsepower High Output version that wielded 380 foot-pounds of torque. Performance enthusiasts naturally gravitated to the 400 V-8s, and there were three versions of it: the four-barrel carburetor 330-horsepower 400, generating 430 foot-pounds of torque, the High Output 335-horsepower 400, with 430 foot-pounds of torque and a four-barrel carburetor, and the Ram Air High Output version with same horsepower and torque ratings as the HO version. The 400 HO featured a revised cam and free-flow exhausts, and came with a four-speed manual transmission. Later Firebirds received the Ram Air II option that generated 340 horsepower. The Ram Air option was available for an extra $600. A three-speed manual or two-speed automatic transmission matched the non-HO engines.
Oh the 2013 Camaro was styled off of the 69 Camaro. You should have kept that 69.

Since: Dec 12

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#7392
Dec 19, 2012
 
PHD wrote:
Two versions of the rarely ordered in-line six-cylinder engine were available on the 1968 Pontiac Firebird: The 175- and 215-horsepower 250-cubic-inch engines with torque ratings of 240 and 255 foot-pounds, respectively. The more common engine was the 265-horsepower 350 V-8 with 355 foot-pounds of torque and a two-barrel carburetor, but buyers could also order the 320-horsepower High Output version that wielded 380 foot-pounds of torque. Performance enthusiasts naturally gravitated to the 400 V-8s, and there were three versions of it: the four-barrel carburetor 330-horsepower 400, generating 430 foot-pounds of torque, the High Output 335-horsepower 400, with 430 foot-pounds of torque and a four-barrel carburetor, and the Ram Air High Output version with same horsepower and torque ratings as the HO version. The 400 HO featured a revised cam and free-flow exhausts, and came with a four-speed manual transmission. Later Firebirds received the Ram Air II option that generated 340 horsepower. The Ram Air option was available for an extra $600. A three-speed manual or two-speed automatic transmission matched the non-HO engines.
Oh the 2013 Camaro was styled off of the 69 Camaro. You should have kept that 69.
When I bought it in 1983, the frame was bent so that it wore in the left side's tires. I didn't notice it until afterward. Today, it would be an easy fix. Setup, measure, and pull of about three hours. Back then, not so much. Mine was the HO, not the Ram Air. It was also missing part of the grille moulding. It had a

I'd love to find and restore it, but it would never be a daily driver. I believe I paid $2500 for it in Tacoma, WA, when I was in the Army.
SpaceBlues

Houston, TX

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#7393
Dec 19, 2012
 
DillinghamLawFirm wrote:
<quoted text>
When I bought it in 1983, the frame was bent so that it wore in the left side's tires. I didn't notice it until afterward. Today, it would be an easy fix. Setup, measure, and pull of about three hours. Back then, not so much. Mine was the HO, not the Ram Air. It was also missing part of the grille moulding. It had a
I'd love to find and restore it, but it would never be a daily driver. I believe I paid $2500 for it in Tacoma, WA, when I was in the Army.
It had a ...

???

Btw, welcome to the forum. Nice to hear from FL!
PHD

Bertram, TX

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#7394
Dec 19, 2012
 

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DillinghamLawFirm wrote:
<quoted text>
When I bought it in 1983, the frame was bent so that it wore in the left side's tires. I didn't notice it until afterward. Today, it would be an easy fix. Setup, measure, and pull of about three hours. Back then, not so much. Mine was the HO, not the Ram Air. It was also missing part of the grille moulding. It had a
I'd love to find and restore it, but it would never be a daily driver. I believe I paid $2500 for it in Tacoma, WA, when I was in the Army.
I do believe your answer was directed towards climate change. It had something to do with m.p.g. contributing to climate change. Some one missed your response. It must be the legal lingo you used that confused them. I'm with you back in the early 90's I restored a 68 Formula 400. Should have kept that 68.
neutral observer

West Palm Beach, FL

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#7395
Dec 19, 2012
 

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PHD wrote:
<quoted text>I do believe your answer was directed towards climate change. It had something to do with m.p.g. contributing to climate change. Some one missed your response. It must be the legal lingo you used that confused them. I'm with you back in the early 90's I restored a 68 Formula 400. Should have kept that 68.
No. That will have no effect. Global warming is part of a natural cycle. We have periods of warming followed by periods of cooling. A pendulum effect. Nothing mankind can do about it really.

Since: Dec 12

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#7396
Dec 19, 2012
 

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PHD wrote:
<quoted text>I do believe your answer was directed towards climate change. It had something to do with m.p.g. contributing to climate change. Some one missed your response. It must be the legal lingo you used that confused them. I'm with you back in the early 90's I restored a 68 Formula 400. Should have kept that 68.
My '68 Firebird put a lot more carbon into the atmosphere for a lot less power. Today's engines--including the Eco-Boost--pollute less and deliver much more usable power. I recall when V-6 engines were loers and four cylinder engines were never classified as powerful." In fact, I recall having a motorcycle with more horsepower than a friend's Nissan.

Now, we have four cyclinder engines that are efficient and powerful. Time are a'changin'.
litesong

Everett, WA

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#7397
Dec 19, 2012
 

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ChromiuMan wrote:
A huge chunk of fuel efficiency does revolve around driving habits.....
As I've said in other threads:

One leadfooter driver of big vehicles, say averages 15mpg in their cars, would use 50,000 gallons for a lifetime's 750,000 miles of driving. If he would adopt careful driving techniques, could average 17mpg, he would use ~44000 gallons during his lifetime.... a saving of 6000 gallons.

Say, a leadfooter of Prius cars(& there are such people) who 'only' averaged 40mpg would use ~19000 gallons over a lifetime. By featherfooting his Prius to 46+mpg he would save ~1500 gallons. Yeah, yeah, I know there are Prius drivers getting 50-60+mpg!

See! The lead footed big vehicle driver becoming a featherfoot, saves ~4 times MORE fuel than the leadfooted Prius driver becoming an easy footer.

“dening those who deny nature. ”

Since: Jun 07

Norfolk va

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#7398
Dec 19, 2012
 

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ChromiuMan wrote:
<quoted text>
There has to be moisture in the air to precipitate, and the colder the air, the less moisture it can hold. The Antarctic ice is getting thicker, but this is not despite warmer global temperatures, but because of changing weather. Next, you might say that the area of antarctic sea ice is getting larger - more of the same. It is slightly larger, while the arctic sea ice has been significantly smaller.
Actually, this time of year the Artic ice is getting larger. After all, it is winter in the Northern hemisphere.

As for Anartica, the mosture laden air from the ocean flows inland and leaves the mosture behind. You must of forgot that the entire land mass is surronded by oceans and some of the meanist in the world. If you do the research you would of discovered that storm ravaged oceans loose more water than placid water. More surface area for evaporation to take place and moving air speeds evaporation.

“dening those who deny nature. ”

Since: Jun 07

Norfolk va

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#7399
Dec 19, 2012
 

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Fair Game wrote:
<quoted text>
Snow falls on top and buries stuff.
Ice flows out at the sides and melts.
What's important is which happens faster?
The answer is more is melting.
Care to prove that. Actually the evidence I have seen is that the mass is increasing. Even more so along the coast.

“dening those who deny nature. ”

Since: Jun 07

Norfolk va

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#7400
Dec 19, 2012
 

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ChromiuMan wrote:
<quoted text>
There are trains using inductive braking, but they already have the ferrous rails to work against. The issue with wireless coupling and linear accelerators is that they require a strong current through induction coils - to build that into all the lanes of over 55,000,000 miles of roads would make the federal debt look like chump change, and the cumulative transmission losses would be phenomenal.
I'm not averse to new ideas or technologies - I think many are long overdue, but as the saying goes (and no offense intended)
"It's great to keep an open mind, but not so open your brains fall out."
And yet you still have to generate that electrical power. How do you propose to do that? Wind, sorry, but if you placed wind generators a quarter mile apart accross every land you would sill run short on days when the air is calm and it is always calm somewhere. Then you also have to deal with transmission loss. Solar, sorry but the first overcast day and you would be in the same place as wind. Not to mention that only part of every day will the sun be strong enough to generate power. Days when it is raining, snowing, dark, fog, or even overcast and your solar panels are only a good place to get out of the rain.

So you have nuclear, gas, oil, and coal. Given how some feel about nuclear which to say they hate it worse than coal you are going to be generating something.

I guess according to your definition you have a wide open mind. And if I find your missing organ I will try to ensure you receive it quickly as possible. After educating it, after all, a mind is a terrible thing to waste.

“dening those who deny nature. ”

Since: Jun 07

Norfolk va

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#7401
Dec 19, 2012
 

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litesong wrote:
<quoted text>
For a present tech engine, used in much of the world, what do you think of Ford introducing the 3-cylinder one liter Eco-Boost turbo engined Fiesta to the U.S.? Being a small car person, I think its worth a try. However, Chevy already has the tiny 1.4 liter 4-cylinder turbo in the fairly heavy 3000+ pound Cruze, getting 42 mpg. Real-world mpg feather footers are getting 50+mpg on the highway.
I would hope the Ford Fiesta gets 45-50mpg EPA on the highway, altho the low end of the spread might be most realistic. Its too bad the Hyundai Elantra took a 2mpg EPA cut recently. Love the looks of the Elantra. However, the ugly Nissan Versa sedan with CVT transmission got a 2mpg boost, just playing with the computer.
Love CVT transmissions. Looks like the Honda has a very responsive CVT in their new Accord!
Actually, the small engines were already being used in other parts of the world. When stationed in Italy I drove a Fiat 500 that had an engine that was the same size as a riding lawn mower. My husband once took the engine out by simply disconnecting it and lifting it out.

The reason it was called a 500 because that was the size of the engine. It had a half liter engine in the back.

“See how you are?”

Since: Jul 12

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#7402
Dec 19, 2012
 

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tina anne wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, this time of year the Artic ice is getting larger. After all, it is winter in the Northern hemisphere.
As for Anartica, the mosture laden air from the ocean flows inland and leaves the mosture behind. You must of forgot that the entire land mass is surronded by oceans and some of the meanist in the world. If you do the research you would of discovered that storm ravaged oceans loose more water than placid water. More surface area for evaporation to take place and moving air speeds evaporation.
Not trying to be rude - honestly. Do you have a point?
litesong

Everett, WA

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#7403
Dec 19, 2012
 

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litesong wrote:
For a present tech engine, used in much of the world, what do you think of Ford introducing the 3-cylinder one liter Eco-Boost turbo engined Fiesta to the U.S.?
//////////
'tiny-minded anne' wrote:
Actually, the small engines were already being used in other parts of the world.
//////////
litesong wrote:
I don't know how you come up with such interesting facts. It couldn't be that I already said it.

'For a present tech engine, used in much of the world......'
litesong

Everett, WA

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#7404
Dec 19, 2012
 

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tina anne wrote:
Actually, this time of year the Artic ice is getting larger. After all, it is winter in the Northern hemisphere.
As for Anartica, the mosture laden air from the ocean flows inland and leaves the mosture behind. You must of forgot that the entire land mass is surronded by oceans and some of the meanist in the world. If you do the research you would of discovered that storm ravaged oceans loose more water than placid water. More surface area for evaporation to take place and moving air speeds evaporation.
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ChromiuMan wrote:
Not trying to be rude - honestly. Do you have a point?
//////////
litesong wrote:
I mean to be rude.

Artic(sic)-sic
Anarctica-sic
mosture-sic
mosture-sic
surronded-sic
loose-sic

As for her report on Antarctica..........the same was predicted in 2002, confirmed in 2005 & as many toxic topix AGW deniers point out, coming true.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/...

Of course, tina anne would know this. I've posted it 50-100 times.

Since: Apr 08

"the green troll"

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#7405
Dec 20, 2012
 

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tina anne wrote:
<quoted text>
Care to prove that. Actually the evidence I have seen is that the mass is increasing. Even more so along the coast.
No problem:

Ice Sheet Loss at Both Poles Increasing, Study Finds
11.29.12

PASADENA, Calif.- An international team of experts supported by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) has combined data from multiple satellites and aircraft to produce the most comprehensive and accurate assessment to date of ice sheet losses in Greenland and Antarctica and their contributions to sea level rise.

In a landmark study published Thursday in the journal Science, 47 researchers from 26 laboratories report the combined rate of melting for the ice sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica has increased during the last 20 years. Together, these ice sheets are losing more than three times as much ice each year (equivalent to sea level rise of 0.04 inches or 0.95 millimeters) as they were in the 1990s (equivalent to 0.01 inches or 0.27 millimeters). About two-thirds of the loss is coming from Greenland, with the rest from Antarctica.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/Grace/news/...
PHD

Bertram, TX

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#7406
Dec 20, 2012
 

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DillinghamLawFirm wrote:
<quoted text>
My '68 Firebird put a lot more carbon into the atmosphere for a lot less power. Today's engines--including the Eco-Boost--pollute less and deliver much more usable power. I recall when V-6 engines were loers and four cylinder engines were never classified as powerful." In fact, I recall having a motorcycle with more horsepower than a friend's Nissan.
Now, we have four cyclinder engines that are efficient and powerful. Time are a'changin'.
Yes times are changing but people will resist change as in the past.
PHD

Bertram, TX

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#7407
Dec 20, 2012
 

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neutral observer wrote:
<quoted text>
No. That will have no effect. Global warming is part of a natural cycle. We have periods of warming followed by periods of cooling. A pendulum effect. Nothing mankind can do about it really.
Ok now show all your work to prove disprove your statement. Please hold off the cut and paste thing.

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