Scientists say they have proved climate change is real, now mus...

Full story: Hartford Courant

Scientists studying the changing nature of the Earth's climate say they have completed one crucial task - proving beyond a doubt that global warming is real.
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“I Luv Carbon Dioxide”

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#7348
Dec 16, 2012
 

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ChromiuMan wrote:
MTBE doesn't break down in soils and is far, far more toxic than ethanol.
What's the lethal dose to 50% of the subjects exposed? Ethanol is more toxic than water, but maybe less than MTBE. I'd like to see the numbers.

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ChromiuMan wrote:
You do not want MTBE in your aquifer.
I want water in my aquifer and and more alcohol in my beer than in my gas tank. Call me old fashioned; I like gasoline and fossil fuel derivatives. Burn the old and keep the new.

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ChromiuMan wrote:
A better alternative to alcohol or MTBE would be to move toward biofuels that don't originate from food stocks
Just as bad; diverting land, labor and investment from food to fuel increases the price of food. A better alternative to alcohol is fossil fuel, natural gas, oil and coal powered fuel cells.

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ChromiuMan wrote:
and to break from traditional reciprocating engine technology.
Or let the market decide; instead of fool politicians and crony green business buddies. There's nothing wrong with internal combustion that a muffler can't fix.

These environmentalists would prefer transportation by wind powered propellers on beanie caps, to the internal combustion engine.
PHD

Overton, TX

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#7349
Dec 16, 2012
 

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The climate change really really means nothing other than a new method for the scare monger AKA "litesout".

“See how you are?”

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#7350
Dec 16, 2012
 

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tina anne wrote:
<quoted text>
I am assuming that you are talking about Antartica and the funny thing is that based on the measurements and other evidence that it is getting thicker. Numerous man made items have been abandoned for one reason or another and quickly buried. Equipment like cranes for example.
So how can you extrapolate that Antartica is shrinking when there is plenty of proof that the sheet is thickening? That if anything the mass of the Antartic ice sheet is if anything growing.
http://www.fogonazos.es/2007/04/recovery-of-a...
http://www.iceagenow.com/Construction_Crane_B...
There has to be moisture in the air to precipitate, and the colder the air, the less moisture it can hold. The Antarctic ice is getting thicker, but this is not despite warmer global temperatures, but because of changing weather. Next, you might say that the area of antarctic sea ice is getting larger - more of the same. It is slightly larger, while the arctic sea ice has been significantly smaller.

Since: Apr 08

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#7351
Dec 16, 2012
 

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tina anne wrote:
<quoted text>
I am assuming that you are talking about Antartica and the funny thing is that based on the measurements and other evidence that it is getting thicker. Numerous man made items have been abandoned for one reason or another and quickly buried. Equipment like cranes for example.
So how can you extrapolate that Antartica is shrinking when there is plenty of proof that the sheet is thickening? That if anything the mass of the Antartic ice sheet is if anything growing.
http://www.fogonazos.es/2007/04/recovery-of-a...
http://www.iceagenow.com/Construction_Crane_B...
Snow falls on top and buries stuff.

Ice flows out at the sides and melts.

What's important is which happens faster?

The answer is more is melting.

“See how you are?”

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#7352
Dec 16, 2012
 

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Brian_G wrote:
<quoted text>What's the lethal dose to 50% of the subjects exposed? Ethanol is more toxic than water, but maybe less than MTBE. I'd like to see the numbers.
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<quoted text>I want water in my aquifer and and more alcohol in my beer than in my gas tank. Call me old fashioned; I like gasoline and fossil fuel derivatives. Burn the old and keep the new.
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<quoted text>Just as bad; diverting land, labor and investment from food to fuel increases the price of food. A better alternative to alcohol is fossil fuel, natural gas, oil and coal powered fuel cells.
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<quoted text>Or let the market decide; instead of fool politicians and crony green business buddies. There's nothing wrong with internal combustion that a muffler can't fix.
These environmentalists would prefer transportation by wind powered propellers on beanie caps, to the internal combustion engine.

Gasoline is toxic. Ethyl alcohol is toxic. Methyl tert-butyl ether is toxic. ICE emissions are toxic. Even water is toxic if you drink large enough amounts. You can easily look up the MSDS for almost any chemical you want. Don't ask me to do your homework.
I don't really care about your love of antique technology. We've been using essentially the same engine for well over a hundred years. It's a new millenia and past time to make good use of that vastly larger database of knowledge we've accumulated since 1876.

“See how you are?”

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#7353
Dec 16, 2012
 

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PHD wrote:
<quoted text> www.ehow.com/how_8777580_do-yourself-winding-...
Maybe this will help.
Nope. Doesn't help me and doesn't help you. The physics and my point remain. There is the pie in the sky theory, and there is the reasonable application. You can continue attempts to belittle, but it changes nothing.
If you place coils close enough to enable inductive charging, you may as well omit the excess apparatus and plug the battery into the power supply. Faster, cheaper, more efficient. Defending Rube Goldberg "as seen in Sky Mall" devices doesn't make you a futurist.
Who finances a space array? How do you transmit power to a terrestrial receiver? When (if ever? Doubtful.) will the technology make it more practical or economical than many, many other means of generating electricity? Geothermal, hydro-thermal, Hydroelectric, solar, tidal, wind, combustion....

Since: Mar 09

Wichita, KS

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#7354
Dec 16, 2012
 

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ChromiuMan wrote:
<quoted text>
Nope. Doesn't help me and doesn't help you. The physics and my point remain. There is the pie in the sky theory, and there is the reasonable application. You can continue attempts to belittle, but it changes nothing.
If you place coils close enough to enable inductive charging, you may as well omit the excess apparatus and plug the battery into the power supply. Faster, cheaper, more efficient. Defending Rube Goldberg "as seen in Sky Mall" devices doesn't make you a futurist.
Who finances a space array? How do you transmit power to a terrestrial receiver? When (if ever? Doubtful.) will the technology make it more practical or economical than many, many other means of generating electricity? Geothermal, hydro-thermal, Hydroelectric, solar, tidal, wind, combustion....
You are probably correct, but I wonder about transportation ie. roads that induct power to cars.
litesong

Lynnwood, WA

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#7355
Dec 16, 2012
 

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phdudd wrote:
.....the scare monger AKA "litesout".
phdudd is a silly goose.

Since: Apr 08

"the green troll"

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#7356
Dec 17, 2012
 

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Fair Game wrote:
<quoted text>
Snow falls on top and buries stuff.
Ice flows out at the sides and melts.
What's important is which happens faster?
The answer is more is melting.
Stronger snowfall increases future ice discharge from Antarctica. Global warming leads to more precipitation as warmer air holds more moisture – hence earlier research suggested the Antarctic ice sheet might grow under climate change. Now a study published in Nature shows that a lot of the ice gain due to increased snowfall is countered by an acceleration of ice-flow to the ocean. Thus Antarctica’s contribution to global sea-level rise is probably greater than hitherto estimated, the team of authors from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) concludes.

“Between 30 and 65 percent of the ice gain due to enhanced snowfall in Antarctica is countervailed by enhanced ice loss along the coastline,” says lead-author Ricarda Winkelmann. For the first time, an ensemble of ice-physics simulations shows that future ice discharge is increased up to three times because of additional precipitation in Antarctica under global warming.“The effect exceeds that of surface warming as well as that of basal ice-shelf melting,” Winkelmann says.

http://www.skepticalscience.com/news.php...

“I Luv Carbon Dioxide”

Since: Dec 08

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#7357
Dec 17, 2012
 

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ChromiuMan wrote:
Gasoline is toxic. Ethyl alcohol is toxic. Methyl tert-butyl ether is toxic. ICE emissions are toxic. Even water is toxic if you drink large enough amounts. You can easily look up the MSDS for almost any chemical you want. Don't ask me to do your homework.
Or admit your ignorance; all mass transportation service creates pollution.

There is no zero emission magic; life means emissions. Get over your fear.

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ChromiuMan wrote:
I don't really care about your love of antique technology. We've been using essentially the same engine for well over a hundred years. It's a new millenia and past time to make good use of that vastly larger database of knowledge we've accumulated since 1876.
Let the customer decide, not the bureaucrat or politician. Get government out of climate, green energy or the environment. We need an energy policy that encourages the production and use of energy and fuel.
PHD

Overton, TX

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#7358
Dec 17, 2012
 

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ChromiuMan wrote:
<quoted text>
Nope. Doesn't help me and doesn't help you. The physics and my point remain. There is the pie in the sky theory, and there is the reasonable application. You can continue attempts to belittle, but it changes nothing.
If you place coils close enough to enable inductive charging, you may as well omit the excess apparatus and plug the battery into the power supply. Faster, cheaper, more efficient. Defending Rube Goldberg "as seen in Sky Mall" devices doesn't make you a futurist.
Who finances a space array? How do you transmit power to a terrestrial receiver? When (if ever? Doubtful.) will the technology make it more practical or economical than many, many other means of generating electricity? Geothermal, hydro-thermal, Hydroelectric, solar, tidal, wind, combustion....
Sorry that you’re stuck behind. As mentioned before they poked fun at Henry Ford. Do tell all your theory. Never belittled just asked a question that you cannot or refuse to answer
PHD

Overton, TX

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#7359
Dec 17, 2012
 

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litesout wrote:
<quoted text>
phdudd is a silly goose.
Not as silly as you goosee.

“See how you are?”

Since: Jul 12

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#7360
Dec 17, 2012
 
Patriot AKA Bozo wrote:
<quoted text>
You are probably correct, but I wonder about transportation ie. roads that induct power to cars.
There are trains using inductive braking, but they already have the ferrous rails to work against. The issue with wireless coupling and linear accelerators is that they require a strong current through induction coils - to build that into all the lanes of over 55,000,000 miles of roads would make the federal debt look like chump change, and the cumulative transmission losses would be phenomenal.

I'm not averse to new ideas or technologies - I think many are long overdue, but as the saying goes (and no offense intended)
"It's great to keep an open mind, but not so open your brains fall out."

“See how you are?”

Since: Jul 12

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#7361
Dec 17, 2012
 
PHD wrote:
<quoted text>Sorry that you’re stuck behind. As mentioned before they poked fun at Henry Ford. Do tell all your theory. Never belittled just asked a question that you cannot or refuse to answer
I'm neither behind nor beside and being realistic is not a bad thing. I don't recall Ford being made fun of - he was one of a hundred car builders during the time of his company's inception. His assembly line was innovative, but not controversial. Maybe you are thinking of Fulton?
What theory are you referring to? I don't recall proposing any. For that matter - I don't recall that you've asked me any questions, either. You mentioned inductive charging and space stations and I rationally pointed out that those specific technologies are unlikely to become practical.
I could be wrong, but I don't foresee that unless there is some quantum breakthrough - which is unpredictable.

Since: Mar 09

Wichita, KS

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#7362
Dec 17, 2012
 
ChromiuMan wrote:
<quoted text>
There are trains using inductive braking, but they already have the ferrous rails to work against. The issue with wireless coupling and linear accelerators is that they require a strong current through induction coils - to build that into all the lanes of over 55,000,000 miles of roads would make the federal debt look like chump change, and the cumulative transmission losses would be phenomenal.
I'm not averse to new ideas or technologies - I think many are long overdue, but as the saying goes (and no offense intended)
"It's great to keep an open mind, but not so open your brains fall out."
I understand that building entire roadways with inductive capabilities would be prohibitive. However, sections of lanes that will inductively charge the batteries in an electric vehicle might be interesting. Especially with the utilization of local solar and/or wind energy.

Since: Mar 09

Wichita, KS

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#7363
Dec 17, 2012
 
ChromiuMan wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm neither behind nor beside and being realistic is not a bad thing. I don't recall Ford being made fun of - he was one of a hundred car builders during the time of his company's inception. His assembly line was innovative, but not controversial. Maybe you are thinking of Fulton?
What theory are you referring to? I don't recall proposing any. For that matter - I don't recall that you've asked me any questions, either. You mentioned inductive charging and space stations and I rationally pointed out that those specific technologies are unlikely to become practical.
I could be wrong, but I don't foresee that unless there is some quantum breakthrough - which is unpredictable.
His mass production lines were not innovative. The application of assembly lines in the manufacturing of automobiles was.

In his book, The Wealth of Nations, published in 1776, Adam Smith had discussed the idea of dividing labor—giving a single task to each worker to perform.

In 1798 Eli Whitney built a firearms factory near New Haven. The muskets his workmen made by methods comparable to those of modern mass industrial production were the first to have standardized, interchangeable parts.

It is noteworthy to learn that Henry Ford was not always open to new ideas. He doggedly held onto mechanical, or cable, brakes for automobiles until 1939, even though hydraulic systems were superior and used by all the other major companies.

“See how you are?”

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#7364
Dec 17, 2012
 
Patriot AKA Bozo wrote:
<quoted text>
I understand that building entire roadways with inductive capabilities would be prohibitive. However, sections of lanes that will inductively charge the batteries in an electric vehicle might be interesting. Especially with the utilization of local solar and/or wind energy.
I never said it was impossible, just impractical. To generate electricity all you need to do is pass a coil across magnetic flux lines - you could do that simply by installing strong magnets on the roadway and having fine wire coils on the underside of the vehicle. Sure, an external power supply might be nice, supercooled or (near) room temperature superconductors would be great. However, as Heinlein stated, TANSTAAFL.(There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch.)

Since: Mar 09

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#7365
Dec 17, 2012
 
ChromiuMan wrote:
<quoted text>
I never said it was impossible, just impractical. To generate electricity all you need to do is pass a coil across magnetic flux lines - you could do that simply by installing strong magnets on the roadway and having fine wire coils on the underside of the vehicle. Sure, an external power supply might be nice, supercooled or (near) room temperature superconductors would be great. However, as Heinlein stated, TANSTAAFL.(There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch.)
It takes at least as much power to pass the coils across the magnets as the gain in electric power to the batteries. That is unless you have invented perpetual motion.
PHD

Overton, TX

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#7366
Dec 17, 2012
 

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ChromiuMan wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm neither behind nor beside and being realistic is not a bad thing. I don't recall Ford being made fun of - he was one of a hundred car builders during the time of his company's inception. His assembly line was innovative, but not controversial. Maybe you are thinking of Fulton?
What theory are you referring to? I don't recall proposing any. For that matter - I don't recall that you've asked me any questions, either. You mentioned inductive charging and space stations and I rationally pointed out that those specific technologies are unlikely to become practical.
I could be wrong, but I don't foresee that unless there is some quantum breakthrough - which is unpredictable.
People said Ford had a bad idea that a low-priced car would be a success. Only the rich could afford the horseless carriage. Henry said, "No, the car will some day be a poor man's necessity."
Some ads read, "If you buy a Ford car you buy a lawsuit."
The theory would be ( your words)"I rationally pointed out that those specific technologies are unlikely to become practical".
This would be your theory.All we read from you is I don't,I could be I,I,I. So if it isn't your idea or theory it couldn't be true.

“See how you are?”

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#7367
Dec 17, 2012
 

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Patriot AKA Bozo wrote:
<quoted text>
It takes at least as much power to pass the coils across the magnets as the gain in electric power to the batteries. That is unless you have invented perpetual motion.
Of course, and a vehicle may as well be equipped with regenerative braking over installing magnetics on downgrades and prior to stop signs. Perhaps inductive charging panels would be best located at traffic lights during which the charge would be timed to the light and a vehicle would be at rest over the coil(s) anyway. Otherwise, they could be built into parking spaces and the cost defrayed by the meter or parking fee. The field strengths would by necessity be considerable, and there would have to be consideration that the frequency/resonance not interfere with other devices.

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