Once slow-moving threat, global warmi...

Once slow-moving threat, global warming speeds up, leaving litt...

There are 59517 comments on the Newsday story from Dec 14, 2008, titled Once slow-moving threat, global warming speeds up, leaving litt.... In it, Newsday reports that:

When Bill Clinton took office in 1993, global warming was a slow-moving environmental problem that was easy to ignore.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Newsday.

kristy

New Smyrna Beach, FL

#37394 Jul 23, 2013
B as in B S as in S wrote:
<quoted text>
That is some of the most twisted and sick thinking I have heard outside of the 'Race' debates.
Couldn't have said it better myself...people like Bozo would like to keep them on the plantation. The slave owner knows whats best for the poor of Africa while living with all the luxuries that our hydroelectric dams provide.
kristy

New Smyrna Beach, FL

#37395 Jul 23, 2013
Coal is King wrote:
<quoted text>
Never mind the environmentalists. Egypt will never allow that dam to be built. The Nile River is Egypt's life and they'll go to war it if that's what it takes to stop it being dammed upstream.
The dam is on the Congo River at Inga Falls. It won't affect the Nile. The dam is to start construction in 2015 and is supported by the African Development Bank and the World Bank.
kristy

New Smyrna Beach, FL

#37396 Jul 23, 2013
Patriot AKA Bozo wrote:
<quoted text>
Some of those folks would be very happy with even a good cooking pot! How is electricity going to help them?
Oh lord....slave owner mentality at work again. So I don't know, how would electricity help them?. I mean there's no evidence that electricity changes civilizations. I mean we are still using wood and dung to cook with and washing our clothes on the rivers. If just someone would give us a clean burning cooking stove, our lives would be complete.

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#37397 Jul 23, 2013
kristy wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh lord....slave owner mentality at work again. So I don't know, how would electricity help them?. I mean there's no evidence that electricity changes civilizations. I mean we are still using wood and dung to cook with and washing our clothes on the rivers. If just someone would give us a clean burning cooking stove, our lives would be complete.
And of course those folks could go out and buy an electric skillet and a crockpot to cook in. Perhaps a flat screen TV, a washer and dryer, and an electric can opener. Good grief, many hardly can afford a decent cooking pot. There are no big solutions. Try to think for a change!
Coal is King

Paducah, KY

#37398 Jul 23, 2013
kristy wrote:
<quoted text>
By the way, the dam that is starting construction in 2015 is at the Inga Falls on the Congo River. Due to the Congo River's flow being so strong and so constant, enormous power can be extracted without a large dam to store water, so thus it floods little land, saving rainforests and reducing the need to move people. When it's completed, it will be the largest hydroelectric dam in the world and the most genuinely low-carbon source of energy.
My mistake. I thought you were talking about the new dam that Ethiopia is building on the Nile.

Congo? Yep, it's a real promising place:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/23/opinion/con...

Inga Falls dam will end up like every other development project in Africa has. Most likely the dam will never be finished and the money will end up in the local African dictator's Swiss bank account.
GEEWIZ

Lexington, KY

#37399 Jul 23, 2013
Burn that COAL good 4 cheap dependable electric.use that green energy and b broke and in the dark.
litesong

Everett, WA

#37400 Jul 23, 2013
cheezwhiz wrote:
Burn that COAL good.......
"cheezwhiz" lives in KY, where regional downwinders from coal plants have the highest cancer rates in the the nation.
kristy

New Smyrna Beach, FL

#37401 Jul 23, 2013
Patriot AKA Bozo wrote:
<quoted text>
And of course those folks could go out and buy an electric skillet and a crockpot to cook in. Perhaps a flat screen TV, a washer and dryer, and an electric can opener. Good grief, many hardly can afford a decent cooking pot. There are no big solutions. Try to think for a change!
Which came first? The electricity or the manufacturing jobs? Which came first? The electricity or the crockpot?
kristy

New Smyrna Beach, FL

#37402 Jul 23, 2013
Coal is King wrote:
<quoted text>
My mistake. I thought you were talking about the new dam that Ethiopia is building on the Nile.
Congo? Yep, it's a real promising place:
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/23/opinion/con...
Inga Falls dam will end up like every other development project in Africa has. Most likely the dam will never be finished and the money will end up in the local African dictator's Swiss bank account.
Not disagreeing with you about the corruption and civil wars. One of the main problems in Africa is their open-ended aid from all over the world. This really needs to stop. We seem to keep rewarding corruption. But at the same time, Africa does need a major energy source to make it attractive to new businesses but it's a catch 22, because the corruption and civil wars make it unattractive. The Inga Dam is being backed by the World Bank and other sources, so I would hope there would be some oversight of the project. South Africa has already agreed to buy half of the power from the first stage which in turn will help finance the completion of the dam.
Coal is King

Paducah, KY

#37403 Jul 23, 2013
kristy wrote:
<quoted text>
Not disagreeing with you about the corruption and civil wars. One of the main problems in Africa is their open-ended aid from all over the world. This really needs to stop. We seem to keep rewarding corruption. But at the same time, Africa does need a major energy source to make it attractive to new businesses but it's a catch 22, because the corruption and civil wars make it unattractive. The Inga Dam is being backed by the World Bank and other sources, so I would hope there would be some oversight of the project. South Africa has already agreed to buy half of the power from the first stage which in turn will help finance the completion of the dam.
Nothing will ever "make Africa attractive to new businesses". As to the World Bank and "some oversight of the project" the only oversight that ever worked in Africa was European colonial rule. Even then Africa proved to be a bottomless sinkhole. Africa is a hopeless case. Write it off.

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#37404 Jul 23, 2013
kristy wrote:
<quoted text>
Which came first? The electricity or the manufacturing jobs? Which came first? The electricity or the crockpot?
Manufacturing jobs for sure. I believe the industrial revolution started with steam power provided by burning wood and coal.

Not sure the crockpot but am sure who is the crackpot.

Give it up. A big dam is not going to fix Africa.

Since: Jul 11

Location hidden

#37405 Jul 23, 2013
Coal is King wrote:
<quoted text>
Nothing will ever "make Africa attractive to new businesses". As to the World Bank and "some oversight of the project" the only oversight that ever worked in Africa was European colonial rule. Even then Africa proved to be a bottomless sinkhole. Africa is a hopeless case. Write it off.
Anyway the Chinese bubble is about ready to burst, much earlier than I thought it was. So very soon they won't be buying all that black gold you guys are digging up. They have complete cities that are ghost towns, and lots of other indicators that predict their growth rate to drop by at least half.
Coal is King

Paducah, KY

#37406 Jul 23, 2013
I don't like it that we are selling our coal - coal that we soon won't be allowed to burn ourselves - to China. It's like selling scrap metal to Japan was in the 1930s. They turned that scrap iron into a navy and shot it back at us.
kristy

New Smyrna Beach, FL

#37407 Jul 23, 2013
Coal is King wrote:
<quoted text>
Nothing will ever "make Africa attractive to new businesses". As to the World Bank and "some oversight of the project" the only oversight that ever worked in Africa was European colonial rule. Even then Africa proved to be a bottomless sinkhole. Africa is a hopeless case. Write it off.
I believe you are right.
kristy

New Smyrna Beach, FL

#37408 Jul 23, 2013
Patriot AKA Bozo wrote:
<quoted text>
Manufacturing jobs for sure. I believe the industrial revolution started with steam power provided by burning wood and coal.
Not sure the crockpot but am sure who is the crackpot.
Give it up. A big dam is not going to fix Africa.
Well no coal plants allowed anymore and burning of wood is a no/no. So clean energy is the only thing allowed. They really don't have the option for steam power. So in their situation, the dam would be one of the few options left to provide a sufficient amount of power to the continent. But I agree with Coal is King. We should just let them do whatever they want and butt out. There is nothing we can do about the civil wars and corruption. Sending money to them is only perpetuating the system of corruption. Almost nothing gets to the people. So if they want to build a dam, go for it. Who are we to tell them what to do?
SpaceBlues

United States

#37409 Jul 23, 2013
Does the broad public understand the role of uncertainty in science?

David Gross: The public generally equates uncertainty with a wild guess. Whereas, for a scientist, a theory like the Standard Model is incredibly precise and probabilistic. In science, it is essential never to be totally certain. And that lesson is hammered into every scientist and reader of history. Scientists measure uncertainty using probability theory and statistics. And we have comfort zones when making predictions, error bars. Living with uncertainty is an essential part of science, and it is easily misunderstood.
B as in B S as in S

Eden Prairie, MN

#37410 Jul 24, 2013
Does the narrow field of climate science understand the role of uncertainty?

Of course they are certain about the need to solve a problem that they are uncertain exists. Just ask Gavin Schmidt, Phil Jones or James Hansen.
kristy

New Smyrna Beach, FL

#37411 Jul 24, 2013
SpaceBlues wrote:
Does the broad public understand the role of uncertainty in science?
David Gross: The public generally equates uncertainty with a wild guess. Whereas, for a scientist, a theory like the Standard Model is incredibly precise and probabilistic. In science, it is essential never to be totally certain. And that lesson is hammered into every scientist and reader of history. Scientists measure uncertainty using probability theory and statistics. And we have comfort zones when making predictions, error bars. Living with uncertainty is an essential part of science, and it is easily misunderstood.
The problem with climate science is that they tell us there are many uncertainties on our understanding of the climate, but the one thing that is unequivocal is that CO2 is the main driver of temperatures; even though, temperatures have been flat for 16 years and CO2 has been rising and no climate model predicted this.

Here is a headline from 2009: New estimate based on the forthcoming upturn in solar activity and El Niño southern oscillation cycles is expected to silence global warming sceptics.

The article states: The world faces record-breaking temperatures as the sun's activity increases, leading the planet to heat up SIGNIFICANTLY FASTER faster than scientists had predicted for the next five years, according to a study. As solar activity picks up again in the coming years, the research suggests, temperatures will shoot up at 150% of the rate predicted by the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The study comes within days of announcements from climatologists that the world is entering a new El Niño warm spell. This suggests that temperature rises in the next year could be even more marked than Lean and Rind's paper suggests. A particularly hot autumn and winter could add to the pressure on policy makers to reach a meaningful deal at December's climate-change negotiations in Copenhagen.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/ju...

This paper was supposed to silence the skeptics by predicting a 150% increase in temperatures over the next 5 years, but that hasn't happened, so to be fair does that mean this should silence the alarmists?
gcaveman1

Bay Springs, MS

#37412 Jul 24, 2013
kristy wrote:
<quoted text>
The problem with climate science is that they tell us there are many uncertainties on our understanding of the climate, but the one thing that is unequivocal is that CO2 is the main driver of temperatures; even though, temperatures have been flat for 16 years and CO2 has been rising and no climate model predicted this.
Here is a headline from 2009: New estimate based on the forthcoming upturn in solar activity and El Niño southern oscillation cycles is expected to silence global warming sceptics.
The article states: The world faces record-breaking temperatures as the sun's activity increases, leading the planet to heat up SIGNIFICANTLY FASTER faster than scientists had predicted for the next five years, according to a study. As solar activity picks up again in the coming years, the research suggests, temperatures will shoot up at 150% of the rate predicted by the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The study comes within days of announcements from climatologists that the world is entering a new El Niño warm spell. This suggests that temperature rises in the next year could be even more marked than Lean and Rind's paper suggests. A particularly hot autumn and winter could add to the pressure on policy makers to reach a meaningful deal at December's climate-change negotiations in Copenhagen.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/ju...
This paper was supposed to silence the skeptics by predicting a 150% increase in temperatures over the next 5 years, but that hasn't happened, so to be fair does that mean this should silence the alarmists?
The article you linked to does not even contain the word "Sun" or "solar". Confused?

No one has ever claimed that models would follow reality perfectly. They are meant to be a guide. No one has ever said that warming would be strictly linear.

Try again, if you can.
kristy

New Smyrna Beach, FL

#37413 Jul 24, 2013
gcaveman1 wrote:
<quoted text>
The article you linked to does not even contain the word "Sun" or "solar". Confused?
No one has ever claimed that models would follow reality perfectly. They are meant to be a guide. No one has ever said that warming would be strictly linear.
Try again, if you can.
Sorry about that. I think that was a link in the article I was referring to, but here is the actual article:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/ju...

Not one model predicted a 16 year pause. They expected 5, maybe 10 year pauses, but not 16 and they expected the pauses further out in time. So now scientists are getting together and trying to explain the pause, but at the same time as they are trying to figure what is causing the warming standstill, they want to INSIST that this pause is almost CERTAINLY TEMPORARY and that the consensus among world climatologists is that temperatures will once again begin to rise, likely SOONER THAN LATER.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-07-british-scientis...

May I remind you what was predicted in 2009:

As solar activity picks up again in the coming years, the research suggests, temperatures will shoot up at 150% of the rate predicted by the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The study comes within days of announcements from climatologists that the world is entering a new El Niño warm spell. This suggests that temperature rises in the next year could be even more marked than Lean and Rind's paper suggests.

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