Obama lauds 'essential' partnership

May 24, 2011 Full story: Congleton Guardian 37

Barack Obama has arrived in Britain for a three-day state visit, declaring the UK-US partnership "an essential relationship for us and for the world". The US president flew into Stansted airport ahead of schedule on Monday night to avoid the possibility of disruption to air travel from the ash cloud from an erupting Icelandic volcano.

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Anonymous Proxy

#23 May 24, 2011
No Child Left wrote:
Obama probably assumes that the UK and the Irish Republic are two of those 57 states he thinks comprise the US. No doubt he's working the crowds in the interest of getting the Irish and British vote in 2012.
While visiting the UK, he might want to sugggest negating the 1922 agreement that divided Ireland between Ulster and the eventual Republic. That should set the stage for an "Irish Spring."
It is typical Obama to be vacationing under the guise of "diplomatic visits" while the country is sufffering extraordinary natural disasters. As an absentee president, he is the best I've ever seen.
Wow, Benjamin Netenyahu gives a historic speech before a joint session of the US Congress today, on Iran's nukes, concessions and peace with Palestine....and the Palestinians respond by calling it an act of war.

....MEANWHILE.....

The kenyan communist fraud is schmoozing with the Queen and drinking beer in Ireland.

It's a crime, a shame, and a disgrace that this corrupt, worthless POS is representing our country.

Since: Jan 07

Freeland, PA

#24 May 24, 2011
In response to "I Can Read," it is not I but you who possesses no knowledge of Irish history. As briefly as possible... Until Ireland finally became an independent state in the 1940's, she had been a failed example of "social engineering" for about 800 years. Because of her strategic location, the British feared that she would be used as a point of attack by unfriendly powers. Beginning with "Strongbow," there were incremental invasions, settlements and confiscation of lands. In the 1200's, the powerful Anglos-Norman families, such as the Fitzgerald's and the Barretts arrived in Ireland to assert British authority. Instead, they became "more Irish than the Irish," adopting Irish customs, dress and language. One of their own, Silken Thomas Fitsgerald even led a revolt against the British.

Henry VIII declared himself King of England and Ireland and sent troops there. Elizabeth mounted a more organized atttack, initially with little success in Ulster. Philip, the King of Spain, sent troops to aid the O'Neill and the O'Donnell in ridding themselves of the British nuisance but landed at Kinsale. The combination of the march from Ulster to the South and the inexperience of Irish soldiers in formal warfare caused the Irish defeat there. The British began expanding their toe-hold around Dublin "beyond the Pale." In the 1690's, William of Orange crushed the Irish and the Plantation of Ulster by culturally dissimilar settlers began. During Cromwell's reign, in the 1690's, a strategic battle, the Battle of the Boyne, destroyed the power of the Irish nobility. Rather than make martyrs of them, he allowed them to leave the country in the so-called "Flight of the Earls."

Cromwell confiscated the best land in the country and handed it over to favorite lieutenants, political supporters and leading families. The native Irish were forced into the least desirable regions of the country, living in abject poverty.

As if this were not enough, a series of laws called "the Penal Laws" were inacted which were intended to erase Irish culture. The practice of the Catholic faith was outlawed. Some people, called "priest hunters," made a good living turning over the clergy to authorities. They had no say in their governance, were pushed off anccestral lands, their crops were taken in rent and sold through British middlemen. The use of Gaelic was not just ridiculed but also outlawed. The potato became the staple crop because it had a large yield for small patches of ground. The Great Famine of the 1840's was not the only devastating Famine in Ireland's history. They occurred every twenty years or so.

This Famine was the first, however, that received international attention. The government in London, since the Irish Parliament had been dissolved by the hated "Act of Union," initially ignored reports of conditions in Ireland until they reached crisis proportions. It provided a great opportunity to rid Ireland of the Irish, either through death or immigration. Some landlords contracted unseaworthy "coffin ships," which brought not just healthy immigrants but also the sick and the dying to the US and Canada.

Since: Jan 07

Freeland, PA

#25 May 24, 2011
To continue, there were many uprisings over the years. The 1798 "Year of the French" celebrated the landing of General Humbert at Killalla in Mayo and gave brief hope that Ireland would have a chance to be free. Lord Cornwallis, who was humiliated by the American colonists just about 15 years earlier, quelled the revolt, sent the French home and had as many of the Irish participants, and sometimes non-participants hanged.

There was a "Young Ireland" movement in the 1840's that never got off the ground because of the Famine. One of its leaders was Thomas Meagher, who became famous in the US Civil War. The United Ireland movement included both Catholics and Protestants who both wanted to throw off the yoke of tyranny. Harrassment of landlords and turncoat natives was the forte of the "Ribbon Boys" and the "White Boys."

The Easter Rebellion of 1916 and subsequent death sentences for many of the leaders set the stage for events that eventually resulted in the separation of Ulster from the eventual Republic of Ireland. DeValera, knowing that he could not get Ulster, sent Michael Collins to London to negotiate an agreement. The best deal Collins could get was six (Ulster) and 26 (Southern Ireland.) DeValera condemned the deal and supporters of each engaged in the Irish Civil War in the 1920's. After Collins was ambushed and murdered, DeValera assumed leadership. Concessions were made through the years but Ulster was never on the table. Having been "planted" with culturally, ethnically and religiously dissimilar people, the non-Catholic population identified, not with Ireland but with the UK. Except for a few splinter groups, the IRA, which felt it was fighting a civil war to unite Ireland, has desisted. The bombing in the Tyrone market town of Omagh pretty much turned public opinion against them.

Edward Rutherford has written two excellent historical novels, The Princes of Ireland and The Rebels of Ireland. They are very accurate and would clarify much that will not fit here.

My point here is that Ireland was subjected to numerous invasions, the confiscation of private lands and the removal of its leading families. Its history is one of oppression and abject poverty. The goal of a united Ireland, including Ulster will never happen because the populations are now far too dissimilar. It was unrealistic when DeValera condemned Collins for accepting the deal. Your image of a mild maternal relationship between Britain and Ireland is the result of ignorance of the facts. The history of the two countries is filled with bloodshed, offical oppression, confiscation of private property and enforced abject poverty. Try Rutherford's books. They are very long, but as you say, "I can read."

Since: Jan 07

Freeland, PA

#26 May 24, 2011
Cromwell's conquest of Ireland was in the late 1640's to 1653. Sorry.
democraps

Tampa, FL

#27 May 24, 2011
odumba is a partner with muslim terrorists!
I can read

Edinburgh, UK

#28 May 24, 2011
No Child Left wrote:
In response to "I Can Read," it is not I but you who possesses no knowledge of Irish history. As briefly as possible... Until Ireland finally became an independent state in the 1940's, she had been a failed example of "social engineering" for about 800 years. Because of her strategic location, the British feared that she would be used as a point of attack by unfriendly powers. Beginning with "Strongbow," there were incremental invasions, settlements and confiscation of lands. In the 1200's, the powerful Anglos-Norman families, such as the Fitzgerald's and the Barretts arrived in Ireland to assert British authority. Instead, they became "more Irish than the Irish," adopting Irish customs, dress and language. One of their own, Silken Thomas Fitsgerald even led a revolt against the British.
Henry VIII declared himself King of England and Ireland and sent troops there. Elizabeth mounted a more organized atttack, initially with little success in Ulster. Philip, the King of Spain, sent troops to aid the O'Neill and the O'Donnell in ridding themselves of the British nuisance but landed at Kinsale. The combination of the march from Ulster to the South and the inexperience of Irish soldiers in formal warfare caused the Irish defeat there. The British began expanding their toe-hold around Dublin "beyond the Pale." In the 1690's, William of Orange crushed the Irish and the Plantation of Ulster by culturally dissimilar settlers began. During Cromwell's reign, in the 1690's, a strategic battle, the Battle of the Boyne, destroyed the power of the Irish nobility. Rather than make martyrs of them, he allowed them to leave the country in the so-called "Flight of the Earls."
Cromwell confiscated the best land in the country and handed it over to favorite lieutenants, political supporters and leading families. The native Irish were forced into the least desirable regions of the country, living in abject poverty.
As if this were not enough, a series of laws called "the Penal Laws" were inacted which were intended to erase Irish culture. The practice of the Catholic faith was outlawed. Some people, called "priest hunters," made a good living turning over the clergy to authorities. They had no say in their governance, were pushed off anccestral lands, their crops were taken in rent and sold through British middlemen. The use of Gaelic was not just ridiculed but also outlawed. The potato became the staple crop because it had a large yield for small patches of ground. The Great Famine of the 1840's was not the only devastating Famine in Ireland's history. They occurred every twenty years or so.
This Famine was the first, however, that received international attention. The government in London, since the Irish Parliament had been dissolved by the hated "Act of Union," initially ignored reports of conditions in Ireland until they reached crisis proportions. It provided a great opportunity to rid Ireland of the Irish, either through death or immigration. Some landlords contracted unseaworthy "coffin ships," which brought not just healthy immigrants but also the sick and the dying to the US and Canada.
Ireland became an independant state in the 40's? Really?

Families exerted British authority before Britain even existed?

Henry VIII declared himeslf King of Ireland did he? SO his ancestor Henry II hadn't been declared king by the pope?

Spain sent troops to help oust the British before Britain existed?

The Irish parliament had been dissolved by the hated "Act of Union"? You mean the act of union the Irish parliament voted for?

Britain has a history of some terrible acts in Ireland but at least get the facts right about them.

“It's 420 here.”

Since: Jun 07

cold comfort farm

#29 May 24, 2011
Did Obama find that he was related to Spuds MacKenzie?

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#30 May 24, 2011
The puppets have a meeting. So who cares?

Since: May 08

Deltona Fla

#31 May 25, 2011
No Child Left wrote:
To continue, there were many uprisings over the years. The 1798 "Year of the French" celebrated the landing of General Humbert at Killalla in Mayo and gave brief hope that Ireland would have a chance to be free. Lord Cornwallis, who was humiliated by the American colonists just about 15 years earlier, quelled the revolt, sent the French home and had as many of the Irish participants, and sometimes non-participants hanged.
There was a "Young Ireland" movement in the 1840's that never got off the ground because of the Famine. One of its leaders was Thomas Meagher, who became famous in the US Civil War. The United Ireland movement included both Catholics and Protestants who both wanted to throw off the yoke of tyranny. Harrassment of landlords and turncoat natives was the forte of the "Ribbon Boys" and the "White Boys."
The Easter Rebellion of 1916 and subsequent death sentences for many of the leaders set the stage for events that eventually resulted in the separation of Ulster from the eventual Republic of Ireland. DeValera, knowing that he could not get Ulster, sent Michael Collins to London to negotiate an agreement. The best deal Collins could get was six (Ulster) and 26 (Southern Ireland.) DeValera condemned the deal and supporters of each engaged in the Irish Civil War in the 1920's. After Collins was ambushed and murdered, DeValera assumed leadership. Concessions were made through the years but Ulster was never on the table. Having been "planted" with culturally, ethnically and religiously dissimilar people, the non-Catholic population identified, not with Ireland but with the UK. Except for a few splinter groups, the IRA, which felt it was fighting a civil war to unite Ireland, has desisted. The bombing in the Tyrone market town of Omagh pretty much turned public opinion against them.
Edward Rutherford has written two excellent historical novels, The Princes of Ireland and The Rebels of Ireland. They are very accurate and would clarify much that will not fit here.
My point here is that Ireland was subjected to numerous invasions, the confiscation of private lands and the removal of its leading families. Its history is one of oppression and abject poverty. The goal of a united Ireland, including Ulster will never happen because the populations are now far too dissimilar. It was unrealistic when DeValera condemned Collins for accepting the deal. Your image of a mild maternal relationship between Britain and Ireland is the result of ignorance of the facts. The history of the two countries is filled with bloodshed, offical oppression, confiscation of private property and enforced abject poverty. Try Rutherford's books. They are very long, but as you say, "I can read."
You forgot the great cork famine in County Cork. All the cork trees died and the Irish didn't have anything to plug their whiskey bottles with.

Since: May 08

Deltona Fla

#32 May 25, 2011
I can read wrote:
<quoted text>
Ireland became an independant state in the 40's? Really?
Families exerted British authority before Britain even existed?
Henry VIII declared himeslf King of Ireland did he? SO his ancestor Henry II hadn't been declared king by the pope?
Spain sent troops to help oust the British before Britain existed?
The Irish parliament had been dissolved by the hated "Act of Union"? You mean the act of union the Irish parliament voted for?
Britain has a history of some terrible acts in Ireland but at least get the facts right about them.
But you missed the part about how the "Black Irish" got on the North Coast. I guess you need to be Irish to have even heard of them. I wonder if O'Bama ever heard of them. I thought it would be funny if his Irish ancestors came from that area officially making him Black Irish. Would that make him a Black, Black Irish, Irish? Black Black Irish Irish? How come he gets to be double everything?

Since: May 08

Deltona Fla

#33 May 25, 2011
too droll to troll wrote:
Did Obama find that he was related to Spuds MacKenzie?
Spuds Mackenzie is a great American icon which we would have never had without the Irish. Lets all raise a mug of beer and toast to what the Emerald Isle has provided us with. Those are the kind of roots Iím talking about.

Since: Nov 08

Location hidden

#35 May 25, 2011
sailorman2 wrote:
The Brits aren't stupid. They see this man for what he is and will pay lip service to him. The British do not forget insults either personally or nationally and Obama has done both.
yep

Obama signs Westminster Abbey guestbook, dates it May 24, 2008?

SIPS $1,000 WINE...WONDERS WHATS DA PO FOLK DO-IN BACK HOME

Fumbles toast...DIDNíT HAVE TELEPROMPTER AT THE TABLE.

Since: May 08

Deltona Fla

#36 May 25, 2011
Le Jimbo wrote:
<quoted text>yep
Obama signs Westminster Abbey guestbook, dates it May 24, 2008?
SIPS $1,000 WINE...WONDERS WHATS DA PO FOLK DO-IN BACK HOME
Fumbles toast...DIDNíT HAVE TELEPROMPTER AT THE TABLE.
Shode do peeess you off when you see a darky all drezzed up sittin wid dim rich White folk drankin expensive wine just like he is as good as white people, don't it.

“It's 420 here.”

Since: Jun 07

cold comfort farm

#37 May 25, 2011
swampmudd:
Spuds was an English bull terrier. Nothing Irish about that. Nor is the creation of beer or ale American icon? Anheuser-Bush, who used the bitch for Bud-Lite ads, is no longer American owned. InBev of Belgium now owns everything
'Bud', including their faux Corona like beer with lime flavor.
As for the dog, she died from kidney failure, maybe from drinking bad beer.......

Since: May 08

Deltona Fla

#38 May 26, 2011
too droll to troll wrote:
swampmudd:
Spuds was an English bull terrier. Nothing Irish about that. Nor is the creation of beer or ale American icon? Anheuser-Bush, who used the bitch for Bud-Lite ads, is no longer American owned. InBev of Belgium now owns everything
'Bud', including their faux Corona like beer with lime flavor.
As for the dog, she died from kidney failure, maybe from drinking bad beer.......
Lighten up. It was a joke.

Since: Nov 08

Location hidden

#39 May 26, 2011
swampmudd wrote:
<quoted text>Shode do peeess you off when you see a darky all drezzed up sittin wid dim rich White folk drankin expensive wine just like he is as good as white people, don't it.
sho duz........bouts as bad as watching a watermelon truck wreck in Harlem.

Since: May 08

Deltona Fla

#40 May 26, 2011
Le Jimbo wrote:
<quoted text>sho duz........bouts as bad as watching a watermelon truck wreck in Harlem.
True story. A few years ago I was set up with a vending operation at the big 4th of July fireworks show in Orlando. We had a thunder storm earlier which caused business to be way slower then we had hoped. A guy down the way from me was left with several hundred extra water mellons at the end of the night. He started giving them away. He almost started a riot with people trying to get free water mellon. They were litterally running past me to get there before he ran out. The crowd was about half White half Black, My son in law (who is Black) grined at me and said, "I guess there is a lot more White people with Black in them then we suspected."

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