Blazing meteor falls east of Toronto

Blazing meteor falls east of Toronto

There are 101 comments on the CBC News story from Dec 14, 2011, titled Blazing meteor falls east of Toronto. In it, CBC News reports that:

The meteor was recorded at 6:04 p.m. ET Monday by six cameras that are part of the University of Western Ontario's Southern Ontario Meteor Network, including one in Orangeville, Ont.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at CBC News.

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was seen south of Erin

Toronto, Canada

#1 Dec 14, 2011
but not this magnitude yet http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1527186/
Sharon

Toronto, Canada

#2 Dec 15, 2011
Sharon

Toronto, Canada

#3 Dec 15, 2011
Brent

Toronto, Canada

#4 Dec 15, 2011
Roger

Toronto, Canada

#5 Dec 17, 2011
Barry

Toronto, Canada

#6 Dec 20, 2011
John

Toronto, Canada

#7 Dec 22, 2011
&fe ature=BFa&list=PL2132A6777 EE1B32B&lf=mh_lolz
Phil

Toronto, Canada

#8 Dec 22, 2011
Pat

Toronto, Canada

#9 Dec 24, 2011
Xmas Day

Toronto, Canada

#10 Dec 25, 2011
Saul

Milton, Canada

#11 Dec 25, 2011
Ray

Toronto, Canada

#12 Dec 27, 2011
Android

Toronto, Canada

#13 Dec 29, 2011
Murna

Mississauga, Canada

#14 Dec 31, 2011
Elenin

Toronto, Canada

#15 Jan 3, 2012
Nibiru

Toronto, Canada

#16 Jan 3, 2012
Kate

Providence, UT

#17 Jan 5, 2012
Quadrantid meteor shower

Milton, Canada

#18 Jan 5, 2012
Don’t miss Tuesday night’s Quadrantid meteor shower.

Some observers consider it among the year’s best, often producing more than 100 meteors per hour. But it’s a brief shower, rarely lasting more than a few hours.

The meteors emanate from near the North Star and should peak tonight at around 7:20 Universal Time (2:20 am EST) on Wednesday, January 4th.

Activity occurs on either side of the peak, so be sure to look several times.

The Quadrantid shower is seldom observed, even though it’s a major shower.

This is primarily because of its early January schedule.

The storms and cold tend to keep folks inside in the Northern Hemisphere this time of year.

The comet, called 2003 EH1, that leaves the debris trail which causes the Quadrantids was only found in December 2003 by Peter Jenniskens of NASA’s Ames Research Center.

Tues this week's show is brief because the Earth transits 2003 EH1’s path at a perpendicular angle, which means we quickly move through any debris in its path.

The Quadrantid meteors are named after an obsolete constellation, Quadrans Muralis.

The constellation was removed from sky maps in 1922 when the International Astronomical Union approved the modern list of 88 officially-recognized constellations,

deleting several other constellations at the same time.

You can still find it in sky atlas from the 19th century.

Spaceweather.com has a good sky map to help you locate the Quadrantid shower

http://spaceweather.com/meteors/quadrantids/q...
Darrel

Toronto, Canada

#19 Jan 7, 2012
other sights

Toronto, Canada

#20 Jan 8, 2012

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