Ohio lawmakers push to abolish death penalty

Dec 4, 2013 Full story: The Columbus Dispatch 65

Democratic Reps. Nickie J. Antonio of Lakewood and Dan Ramos of Lorain appeared Tuesday with representatives from the Catholic Conference of Ohio, Temple Israel, and St. John's Episcopal Church of Columbus, to back legislation to replace capital punishment with life without the possibility of parole.

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“PLANET EARTH”

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#22 Dec 7, 2013
TonyD2 wrote:
<quoted text>
I wonder if you'd feel that way if you were wrongly convicted and waiting on death row. It HAS happened, you know...
http://www.innocenceproject.org/Content/Injus...
<quoted text>
It's (an attempt) to make sure they got it right (the conviction). You DO want them to get it right, don't you?
Absolutely I want them to get it right.

Since DNA testing, there have been numerous cases of wronged imprisonment.
But it does depend on the case,facts,evidence,and etc.
The justice system, in my opinion,needs an overhaul.
Men who are absolutely guilty, and evidence of proof, and sentenced to death, are on death row for 20 years,wasting tax dollars. Do you think THAT is fair?
I believe certain criminals are not rehabilitatable.
Our prison systems are overwhelmingly crowded. They also get conveniences that should not be allowed. It's like a party,and they aren't really "suffering" for the crimes they committed. A good percentage of criminals who have served their timed and released, end up back in the system. And the cycle repeats.
Che Reagan Christ

Lodi, OH

#23 Dec 7, 2013
BizzyBee wrote:
<quoted text>
Absolutely I want them to get it right.
Since DNA testing, there have been numerous cases of wronged imprisonment.
But it does depend on the case,facts,evidence,and etc.
The justice system, in my opinion,needs an overhaul.
Men who are absolutely guilty, and evidence of proof, and sentenced to death, are on death row for 20 years,wasting tax dollars. Do you think THAT is fair?
I believe certain criminals are not rehabilitatable.
Our prison systems are overwhelmingly crowded. They also get conveniences that should not be allowed. It's like a party,and they aren't really "suffering" for the crimes they committed. A good percentage of criminals who have served their timed and released, end up back in the system. And the cycle repeats.
The prisons aren't overcrowded because of murderers. They are overcrowded primarily because of drug addicts who are in on low level felonies and because of mandatory sentencing, mostly on drug crimes.

Prison isn't a party. You are relying on bad information. Again.
Duke for Mayor

Massillon, OH

#24 Dec 7, 2013
TonyD2 wrote:
<quoted text>
What do you do the day after the execution, when it's discovered a mistake was made?
File legislation to raise taxes to compensate the family for the mistake.

woof
Duke for Mayor

Massillon, OH

#25 Dec 7, 2013
TonyD2 wrote:
<quoted text>
I wonder if you'd feel that way if you were wrongly convicted and waiting on death row. It HAS happened, you know...
http://www.innocenceproject.org/Content/Injus...
<quoted text>
It's (an attempt) to make sure they got it right (the conviction). You DO want them to get it right, don't you?
Anyone who thinks that justice is always delivered needs to read "Actual Innocence".

When people get convicted of crimes despite the fact that multiple witnesses can place them 100 miles away from the scene of the crime at the time it was committed, something is very very wrong.

woof

“PLANET EARTH”

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#26 Dec 7, 2013
Che Reagan Christ wrote:
<quoted text>
The prisons aren't overcrowded because of murderers. They are overcrowded primarily because of drug addicts who are in on low level felonies and because of mandatory sentencing, mostly on drug crimes.
Prison isn't a party. You are relying on bad information. Again.
As usual, you are twisting my words. I made a statement that our prisons are over crowded....did I say just murderers? NO I did not.
When you allow prisoners to have the conveniences of getting a college education, and access to the Internet,, tell me....Che, where is the penalty and punishment for the crime they committed?
Duke for Mayor

Massillon, OH

#27 Dec 7, 2013
BizzyBee wrote:
<quoted text>
As usual, you are twisting my words. I made a statement that our prisons are over crowded....did I say just murderers? NO I did not.
When you allow prisoners to have the conveniences of getting a college education, and access to the Internet,, tell me....Che, where is the penalty and punishment for the crime they committed?
You really do have a convoluted vision of what life in prisons and jails is like BB.

Wanna come with me to visit clients some day?

woof
Che Reagan Christ

Lodi, OH

#28 Dec 7, 2013
BizzyBee wrote:
<quoted text>
As usual, you are twisting my words. I made a statement that our prisons are over crowded....did I say just murderers? NO I did not.
When you allow prisoners to have the conveniences of getting a college education, and access to the Internet,, tell me....Che, where is the penalty and punishment for the crime they committed?
The topic of the thread that you were discussing is the abolition of the death penalty. You put forth that our prisons are overcrowded as an argument in favor of killing offenders. I assume that you wanted the death penalty applied as it is currently, for people convicted of aggravated murder with special circumstances. Hence the relevance that overcrowding isn't because of too many death penalty eligible offenders not being killed which makes overcrowding irrelevant to the topic. Perhaps you are advocating for the death penalty for possession of cocaine.

The punishment in prison is the loss of freedom. The inability to kiss your child, buy a Big Mac, go to a high school basketball game, hug your mother, have a pizza and a beer or glass of wine, go to sleep with your spouse, etc. I think you get it. If prison was the holiday you seem to suggest, why don't people want to go there? As for educating people in prison, don't you think that is a good thing? A person with a college degree is far less likely to commit crime than a person without one. Just ask Nate.

“PLANET EARTH”

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#29 Dec 7, 2013
Duke for Mayor wrote:
<quoted text>
You really do have a convoluted vision of what life in prisons and jails is like BB.
Wanna come with me to visit clients some day?
woof
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_in_pris...
I'm sure it's not fun and games, but they do get privileges that aren't making the incarceration effective.
Get what I mean?

Explain it to me then.
Why can a criminal obtain a college education while in prison and a kid who wants to go to college and can't afford the price, just falls by the wayside?
Duke for Mayor

Massillon, OH

#30 Dec 7, 2013
BizzyBee wrote:
<quoted text>
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_in_pris...
I'm sure it's not fun and games, but they do get privileges that aren't making the incarceration effective.
Get what I mean?
Explain it to me then.
Why can a criminal obtain a college education while in prison and a kid who wants to go to college and can't afford the price, just falls by the wayside?
One of the primary purposes of criminal sentencing is rehabilitation.

Perhaps you should do some reading about that.

woof

“Ludibrium est onus genio”

Since: Dec 11

Planet Earth

#31 Dec 7, 2013
Duke for Mayor wrote:
<quoted text>
File legislation to raise taxes to compensate the family for the mistake.
woof
Wow! And what's the monetary equivalent of an innocent human life?

“Ludibrium est onus genio”

Since: Dec 11

Planet Earth

#32 Dec 7, 2013
Duke for Mayor wrote:
<quoted text>
Anyone who thinks that justice is always delivered needs to read "Actual Innocence".
When people get convicted of crimes despite the fact that multiple witnesses can place them 100 miles away from the scene of the crime at the time it was committed, something is very very wrong.
woof
Not to mention recent research that memory and eye-witness testimony aren't as reliable as once thought.

“PLANET EARTH”

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#33 Dec 7, 2013
Duke for Mayor wrote:
<quoted text>
One of the primary purposes of criminal sentencing is rehabilitation.
Perhaps you should do some reading about that.
woof
I know this....but what % of inmates really take advantage of the classes to better themselves.?
We can only hope coming out of prison with a college degree will better the person and his.her likely to have a better life beyond bars.
With some inmates who are the hardened criminals I don't think the chances are great, for some end up behind bars again.
The govt spends millions on criminals for education but yet the student loans and college fees are outrageous.
That's all I want to say.
Che Reagan Christ

Lodi, OH

#34 Dec 7, 2013
BizzyBee wrote:
<quoted text>
I know this....but what % of inmates really take advantage of the classes to better themselves.?
We can only hope coming out of prison with a college degree will better the person and his.her likely to have a better life beyond bars.
With some inmates who are the hardened criminals I don't think the chances are great, for some end up behind bars again.
The govt spends millions on criminals for education but yet the student loans and college fees are outrageous.
That's all I want to say.
You should really consider trying to educate yourself before you form opinions. The government doesn't pay for inmates' college courses.

http://prisonstudiesproject.org/2011/08/ohio-...

http://www.ehow.com/info_8040460_ohio-corresp...
Che Reagan Christ

Lodi, OH

#35 Dec 7, 2013
BizzyBee wrote:
<quoted text>
I know this....but what % of inmates really take advantage of the classes to better themselves.?
We can only hope coming out of prison with a college degree will better the person and his.her likely to have a better life beyond bars.
With some inmates who are the hardened criminals I don't think the chances are great, for some end up behind bars again.
The govt spends millions on criminals for education but yet the student loans and college fees are outrageous.
That's all I want to say.
As far as inmates taking advantage of educational programs offered within the institutions, there are waiting lists months and months long for most programs.

“PLANET EARTH”

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#36 Dec 7, 2013
Che Reagan Christ wrote:
<quoted text>
You should really consider trying to educate yourself before you form opinions. The government doesn't pay for inmates' college courses.
http://prisonstudiesproject.org/2011/08/ohio-...
http://www.ehow.com/info_8040460_ohio-corresp...
Wikipedia:
Prison education, also known as Inmate Education and Correctional Education, is a broad term that encompasses any number of educational activities occurring inside a prison. These educational activities include both vocational training and academic education. The goal of such activities is to prepare the prisoner for success outside of prison and to enhance the rehabilitative aspects of prison.
Educational programs offered inside prisons are typically provided and managed by the prison systems in which they reside. Funding for the programs are provided through official correctional department budgets, private organizations (e.g. colleges, nonprofits, etc.), and the prisoners or their families, if the prisoner is pursuing education through a correspondence program. Educational opportunities can be divided into two general categories: academic education and vocational training.
Che Reagan Christ

Lodi, OH

#37 Dec 7, 2013
BizzyBee wrote:
<quoted text>
Wikipedia:
Prison education, also known as Inmate Education and Correctional Education, is a broad term that encompasses any number of educational activities occurring inside a prison. These educational activities include both vocational training and academic education. The goal of such activities is to prepare the prisoner for success outside of prison and to enhance the rehabilitative aspects of prison.
Educational programs offered inside prisons are typically provided and managed by the prison systems in which they reside. Funding for the programs are provided through official correctional department budgets, private organizations (e.g. colleges, nonprofits, etc.), and the prisoners or their families, if the prisoner is pursuing education through a correspondence program. Educational opportunities can be divided into two general categories: academic education and vocational training.
Not a word of that refutes what I said.

“PLANET EARTH”

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#38 Dec 7, 2013
~
Funding for the programs are provided through official correctional department budgets, private organizations (e.g. colleges, nonprofits, etc.), and the prisoners or their families, if the prisoner is pursuing education through a correspondence program.
~
FUNDING
Provided through
Correctional dept
BUDGETS
Or other....

Learn to comprehend
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#39 Dec 7, 2013
Duke for Mayor wrote:
<quoted text>
One of the primary purposes of criminal sentencing is rehabilitation.
Perhaps you should do some reading about that.
woof
Right. Rehabilitation. Well, since we've been rehabilitating people, we now have the largest percentage of our population behind bars compared to the rest of the world. If jails were run like the movie Cool Hand Luke, you wouldn't need rehabilitation because nobody would want to go there.

Prison should be a deterrent, not a career opportunity.
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#40 Dec 7, 2013
Che Reagan Christ wrote:
<quoted text>
The topic of the thread that you were discussing is the abolition of the death penalty. You put forth that our prisons are overcrowded as an argument in favor of killing offenders. I assume that you wanted the death penalty applied as it is currently, for people convicted of aggravated murder with special circumstances. Hence the relevance that overcrowding isn't because of too many death penalty eligible offenders not being killed which makes overcrowding irrelevant to the topic. Perhaps you are advocating for the death penalty for possession of cocaine.
The punishment in prison is the loss of freedom. The inability to kiss your child, buy a Big Mac, go to a high school basketball game, hug your mother, have a pizza and a beer or glass of wine, go to sleep with your spouse, etc. I think you get it. If prison was the holiday you seem to suggest, why don't people want to go there?
If prison was that bad, why do people keep going back?
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#41 Dec 7, 2013
TonyD2 wrote:
<quoted text>
I wonder if you'd feel that way if you were wrongly convicted and waiting on death row. It HAS happened, you know...
http://www.innocenceproject.org/Content/Injus...
<quoted text>
It's (an attempt) to make sure they got it right (the conviction). You DO want them to get it right, don't you?
What about people like Anthony Sowell?

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