nobody is doing nothing about it

Posted in the Georgetown Forum

Lawyers

Georgetown, Canada

#1 May 5, 2014
Lawyers

Georgetown, Canada

#2 May 5, 2014
Helson, Frederick Arthur, 74, of Halton Hills was given a
one-month suspension effective April 1, 1996, for failing to maintain
appropriate records for the mortgages for which he was responsible,
failing to provide declarations of trust for clients, lending estates
funds without first mortgage security, failing to disclose financial
information to mortgagors, signing the client's name to documents,
and swearing a false affidavit. The Solicitor took steps to ensure
that no client lost money and he has had no previous discipline
record in 37 years of practice. He was called to the bar in 1957.
Ittleman, Richard Michael, 42, of Richmond Hill was reprimanded
by the Society for failing to file mandatory financial forms with the
Society. The Solicitor must also pay $450 in costs to the Society. He
was called to the bar in 1980
Lawyers

Georgetown, Canada

#3 May 5, 2014
shame on them

Georgetown, Canada

#4 May 5, 2014
who look after them no law or jail time
shame on them

Georgetown, Canada

#5 May 5, 2014
Here is a press release from the Law Society of Upper Canada.
I found the press release on the Canada NewsWire web site
at http://www.newswire.ca/
I don't work for or belong to the Law Society.
LAW SOCIETY DISCIPLINES LAWYERS
TORONTO, April 19 /CNW/- Nine lawyers were disciplined in March
by the Law Society of Upper Canada, the governing body of the Ontario
legal profession. The following individuals were found guilty of
professional misconduct.
Ehrlich, Stanley Charles, 41, of Toronto was given a two-month
suspension effective January 18, 1996, for failing to serve clients
conscientiously and diligently, failing to reply to the Law Society,
failing to comply with an undertaking, and misleading the Society.
The Solicitor failed to serve his clients regarding their mortgage
re-financing and he failed to obtain a discharge for a pre-existing
mortgage and a written report regarding the refinancing of their
present property. The Solicitor also failed to serve other clients in
a similar fashion. The Solicitor must also pay $500 in costs to the
Society. He was called to the bar in 1985.
Helson, Frederick Arthur, 74, of Halton Hills was given a
one-month suspension effective April 1, 1996, for failing to maintain
appropriate records for the mortgages for which he was responsible,
failing to provide declarations of trust for clients, lending estates
funds without first mortgage security, failing to disclose financial
information to mortgagors, signing the client's name to documents,
and swearing a false affidavit. The Solicitor took steps to ensure
that no client lost money and he has had no previous discipline
record in 37 years of practice. He was called to the bar in 1957.
Ittleman, Richard Michael, 42, of Richmond Hill was reprimanded
by the Society for failing to file mandatory financial forms with the
Society. The Solicitor must also pay $450 in costs to the Society. He
was called to the bar in 1980.
Jacques, Bert, 59, of Markham was given a three-month suspension
to begin following the Solicitor's current administrative suspension,
for failing to reply to the Society regarding inadequacies in his
books and records, and failing to file mandatory financial forms. The
suspension will continue until the Solicitor files mandatory forms
and replies in a satisfactory manner to the Society. The Solicitor
has a previous discipline record, receiving a reprimand by the
Discipline Committee of the Law Society in April 1995, for practising
while under suspension and failing to maintain books and records. The
Solicitor was also suspended for three months in 1995 for breach of
duty to a client and issuing a false report. In addition to his
suspension, the Solicitor must pay $450 in costs to the Society. He
was called to the bar in 1976.
Kurtz, Alan Douglas, 31, of Toronto was given a one-month
suspension to continue until mandatory annual financial forms are
filed with the Society. He was called to the bar in 1993.
Levinson, Harry Judah, 44, of Toronto was reprimanded by the Law
Society for failing to serve a client conscientiously and diligently.
The Solicitor was found to have improperly withdrawn his services to
an immigration client which left the client seriously disadvantaged
at a hearing. The Solicitor withdrew his services after Legal Aid
would no longer fund the client. The committee found that nonpayment
of fees was not reason enough to desert a client. He was called to
the bar in 1987.
Orzech, Morris Calvin, 60, of Scarborough was given permission
to resign by April 15, 1996, or otherwise be disbarred for
misapplying funds, registering an unauthorized mortgage, failing to
report to a client, failing to obtain, ensure or register first
mortgages and securities, falsely reporting to a client, failing to
comply with an undertaking to his client, acting in a conflict of
interest, failing to comply with a client's instructions, failing to
ensure that a broker had the authority to execute mortgage documents,
improperly registering a m
When will it stop

Georgetown, Canada

#7 May 6, 2014
to much cash going around
same in Haton Hills

Georgetown, Canada

#8 May 6, 2014
same in Haton Hills

Georgetown, Canada

#9 May 6, 2014
John Duerden wanted his $100 million, and he wanted it now.
The chief executive officer of Lernout & Hauspie Speech Products NV had come to South Korea to solve a mystery: why his Korean lieutenants refused to release $100 million in cash they had on their books. Amid a deepening accounting scandal, Lernout & Hauspie, a leading maker of speech-recognition software, desperately needed the funds to stave off bankruptcy.
Arriving at the Seoul office of L&H Korea on Nov. 17, he was kept waiting for an hour before being ushered into a room with a visibly nervous Joo Chul Seo, head of the subsidiary. Mr. Duerden began grilling him about the cash. "Suddenly," Mr. Duerden recalls, "the door was kicked open with a terrific crash and three guys ran into the room, shouting and gesticulating."
The CEO watched in shock as the men dragged Mr. Seo out of the room and into an adjoining office, from where loud shouts and bangs were heard. "I thought the guy was getting beaten up," Mr. Duerden says. After urging employees to call the police, he left the building and high-tailed it out of the country.
The whereabouts of Mr. Seo, whom L&H has suspended, are unknown. But Mr. Duerden soon learned the worst about the $100 million: It was gone. And with it went the company's last hope to remain solvent. Last week Lernout & Hauspie, once one of Europe's leading technology companies, filed for bankruptcy protection.
The scene in Korea was just the latest strange twist in the growing financial scandal at L&H. New management named in August believes it has strong evidence of a pattern of deceptive and questionable accounting practices stretching across many of L&H's operations, according to people close to the Belgian company.
The company, these people say, appears to have improperly reported revenue from barter deals with other software firms in which no cash changed hands; immediately recognized revenue for sales that were contingent on L&H later performing development work for the customer; and sometimes reported sales before contracts were signed, when it was unclear the customer had the ability to pay or when the customer's ability to pay depended on investment from L&H.
In all, tens of millions of dollars in revenue over the past several years may have been improperly recorded, in addition to the problems in Korea, these people say. More details could emerge when and if L&H releases results of a special audit by its regular accounting firm, KPMG International, and of an investigation by its board audit committee.
Thousands of individual shareholders have lost a collective fortune in the fall of a company whose market value was nearly $10 billion nine months ago. Others who stand to lose include some of the savviest technology investors around, including Microsoft Corp. msft -0.56%, the owner of about 5% of L&H, and Intel Corp. intc +0.52%, plus Michael Dell, an investor in bonds of an L&H unit. Stonington Partners Inc., a New York buyout firm, sold L&H a company earlier this year for half a billion dollars in stock that now is close to worthless.
The bankruptcy filing follows L&H's announcement last month that the past 2½ years of its financial statements need to be revised because of errors and "irregularities," a term that in official accounting literature often signifies fraud. Sales are tumbling, and four longtime senior executives have abruptly resigned their posts. L&H, which has headquarters in Burlington, Mass., as well as in Ieper, Belgium, is the focus of a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation and a Belgian judicial probe. Co-founder Pol Hauspie, 49 years old, quit the company's board and has hardly left his home in Belgium in weeks, say people who know him.
L&H got its start 13 years ago when Jo Lernout, then a sales executive with the Belgian arm of Wang Laboratories Inc., grew intrigued by an early Wang voice-mail system. It wasn't selling well because many Europeans still had rotary telephones and couldn't
same in Haton Hills

Georgetown, Canada

#10 May 6, 2014
John Duerden wanted his $100 million, and he wanted it now.
The chief executive officer of Lernout & Hauspie Speech Products NV had come to South Korea to solve a mystery: why his Korean lieutenants refused to release $100 million in cash they had on their books. Amid a deepening accounting scandal, Lernout & Hauspie, a leading maker of speech-recognition software, desperately needed the funds to stave off bankruptcy.
Arriving at the Seoul office of L&H Korea on Nov. 17, he was kept waiting for an hour before being ushered into a room with a visibly nervous Joo Chul Seo, head of the subsidiary. Mr. Duerden began grilling him about the cash. "Suddenly," Mr. Duerden recalls, "the door was kicked open with a terrific crash and three guys ran into the room, shouting and gesticulating."
The CEO watched in shock as the men dragged Mr. Seo out of the room and into an adjoining office, from where loud shouts and bangs were heard. "I thought the guy was getting beaten up," Mr. Duerden says. After urging employees to call the police, he left the building and high-tailed it out of the country.
The whereabouts of Mr. Seo, whom L&H has suspended, are unknown. But Mr. Duerden soon learned the worst about the $100 million: It was gone. And with it went the company's last hope to remain solvent. Last week Lernout & Hauspie, once one of Europe's leading technology companies, filed for bankruptcy protection.
The scene in Korea was just the latest strange twist in the growing financial scandal at L&H. New management named in August believes it has strong evidence of a pattern of deceptive and questionable accounting practices stretching across many of L&H's operations, according to people close to the Belgian company.
The company, these people say, appears to have improperly reported revenue from barter deals with other software firms in which no cash changed hands; immediately recognized revenue for sales that were contingent on L&H later performing development work for the customer; and sometimes reported sales before contracts were signed, when it was unclear the customer had the ability to pay or when the customer's ability to pay depended on investment from L&H.
In all, tens of millions of dollars in revenue over the past several years may have been improperly recorded, in addition to the problems in Korea, these people say. More details could emerge when and if L&H releases results of a special audit by its regular accounting firm, KPMG International, and of an investigation by its board audit committee.
Thousands of individual shareholders have lost a collective fortune in the fall of a company whose market value was nearly $10 billion nine months ago. Others who stand to lose include some of the savviest technology investors around, including Microsoft Corp. msft -0.56%, the owner of about 5% of L&H, and Intel Corp. intc +0.52%, plus Michael Dell, an investor in bonds of an L&H unit. Stonington Partners Inc., a New York buyout firm, sold L&H a company earlier this year for half a billion dollars in stock that now is close to worthless.
The bankruptcy filing follows L&H's announcement last month that the past 2½ years of its financial statements need to be revised because of errors and "irregularities," a term that in official accounting literature often signifies fraud. Sales are tumbling, and four longtime senior executives have abruptly resigned their posts. L&H, which has headquarters in Burlington, Mass., as well as in Ieper, Belgium, is the focus of a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation and a Belgian judicial probe. Co-founder Pol Hauspie, 49 years old, quit the company's board and has hardly left his home in Belgium in weeks, say people who know him.
L&H got its start 13 years ago when Jo Lernout, then a sales executive with the Belgian arm of Wang Laboratories Inc., grew intrigued by an early Wang voice-mail system. It wasn't selling well because many Europeans still had rotary telephones and couldn't -
Good place for the Rats

Georgetown, Canada

#12 May 6, 2014
Halton Police know lots

Toronto, Canada

#13 May 6, 2014
this guy in charge of all

Georgetown, Canada

#14 May 7, 2014
Harper no better

Toronto, Canada

#15 May 7, 2014

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