Hawaii neighbors knew little of Snowden

Hawaii neighbors knew little of Snowden

There are 81 comments on the Daily World story from Jun 10, 2013, titled Hawaii neighbors knew little of Snowden. In it, Daily World reports that:

HONOLULU _ Former neighbors in the subdivision where Edward Snowden lived until last month say they knew him only well enough to wave as they passed by.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Daily World.

No brainer

Mililani, HI

#42 Jul 15, 2013
Joe Balls wrote:
<quoted text> It works great wherever it's used in the states. You must be a pencil-pusher that doesn't really work for a living. Go to You Tube and see for yourself or google "pothole repair machine Hawaii." to see the one that's setting by the airport doing nothing. Or better yet, live in denial.
Yup your a pathological LIAR. Better yet you actually believe your own lies. Someone should borrow this missing pothole machine and use it to patch the big pot hole in your head. The huge puka(hole) between your ears.

Since: Feb 08

Honolulu, HI

#43 Jul 20, 2013
Ange_lena94 wrote:
Edward Snowden- just as Manning and Ellsburg- is a hero!
Have some respect, you ignorant bunch of bigots. Why do you think he gave up living in Hawaii, with a beautiful girlfriend and a good paying job?
Because he enjoys living in Hong Kong, being labeled a 'traitor'?
Use your heads, and open your eyes. Never take everything the mainstream media tells you, as truth.
Whether a hero or traitor, most of us w/ 30+ years of IT experience would warn him of the consequences if he had taken the time to ask for advice. "If you betray the NSA, you will be putting yourself in a position where no one will ever trust you again. Your friends, your family, your co-workers, your nation, other nations. Do you think you can write a book someday? Someone will kill you before you can get it published. The same holds true for anyone to whom you give information. While you think you're doing what's right, sometimes it isn't worth it. You cannot truly win even if you're right. In the end, it's best to report to work, collect your paycheck, live a good life, and keep your mouth shut. While our nation may be wrong to spy on its own citizens, it is still the best nation in which to live. You don't have a college degree and look at where you are today, financially. Only in the USA do you have a chance to do this. It is the American dream and you're living it. Don't make the NSA situation a nightmare. It isn't worth it."

Joe Balls

Since: May 11

Location hidden

#44 Jul 20, 2013
I don't care what his beliefs are, but if he's a traitor, then he's a traitor. What I don't like is how the government is handling this, like they are hiding something. They want him to shut up, and I'm interested in hearing his side of the story WITHOUT him having a sudden heat attack the day before he talks. No Jack Ruby, no poisoned umbrella tip, lets just see what he has to say. Obama is the only one with anything to worry about.
Leeward lolo

Phoenix, AZ

#45 Jul 20, 2013
ETA136 wrote:
<quoted text>
Whether a hero or traitor, most of us w/ 30+ years of IT experience would warn him of the consequences if he had taken the time to ask for advice. "If you betray the NSA, you will be putting yourself in a position where no one will ever trust you again. Your friends, your family, your co-workers, your nation, other nations. Do you think you can write a book someday? Someone will kill you before you can get it published. The same holds true for anyone to whom you give information. While you think you're doing what's right, sometimes it isn't worth it. You cannot truly win even if you're right. In the end, it's best to report to work, collect your paycheck, live a good life, and keep your mouth shut. While our nation may be wrong to spy on its own citizens, it is still the best nation in which to live. You don't have a college degree and look at where you are today, financially. Only in the USA do you have a chance to do this. It is the American dream and you're living it. Don't make the NSA situation a nightmare. It isn't worth it."
What a mealy mouthed worker. The Soviet Union would be a good place for you little obeyers of everything you're told.
The words of today are; SEE SOMETHING... SAY SOMETHING.

You probably thought the same of the writer Salman Rushdie and his last name is rush-die.

Joe Balls

Since: May 11

Location hidden

#46 Jul 21, 2013
Leeward lolo wrote:
<quoted text>
What a mealy mouthed worker. The Soviet Union would be a good place for you little obeyers of everything you're told.
The words of today are; SEE SOMETHING... SAY SOMETHING.
You probably thought the same of the writer Salman Rushdie and his last name is rush-die.
I don't care if the Government eavesdrops, but I don't want a scumsucker like Obama to have have anything to do with it. He isn't interested in catching terrorists, he's their shill in America. He's the peeper that was caught looking into windows, the guy that was blowing guys in his limo. Michelle has no class either, just for putting up with him.
district 1 an a 2 and a 3

Phoenix, AZ

#47 Jul 21, 2013
Joe Balls wrote:
<quoted text> I don't care if the Government eavesdrops, but I don't want a scumsucker like Obama to have have anything to do with it. He isn't interested in catching terrorists, he's their shill in America. He's the peeper that was caught looking into windows, the guy that was blowing guys in his limo. Michelle has no class either, just for putting up with him.
Sounds like a reflection of your upbringing. Poor joey rejected from so many mainland states.

Since: Feb 08

Honolulu, HI

#49 Jul 21, 2013
Leeward lolo wrote:
<quoted text>
What a mealy mouthed worker. The Soviet Union would be a good place for you little obeyers of everything you're told.
The words of today are; SEE SOMETHING... SAY SOMETHING.
You probably thought the same of the writer Salman Rushdie and his last name is rush-die.
I may be a mealy mouthed worker, but I still have my job and Snowden doesn't. I collect a paycheck and Snowden doesn't. I have freedom of movement and Snowden doesn't. My passport is valid and Snowden's isn't. Would I like to be in Snowden's shoes? Not in a million years...
District 1 News and Blues

Phoenix, AZ

#50 Jul 22, 2013
..
..
Vladimir Putin Blows Edward Snowden
PR Coup With Navalny Conviction

By Craig Mellow | Minyanville 3 hours ago
For a minute or two there, Vladimir Putin looked better on the world stage than Barack Obama. The agent for this image miracle -- one the Kremlin's highly paid Western PR firms have pursued for many years completely in vain -- was, of course, Edward Snowden.
[More from Minyanville.com : After Asylum, the Job Hunt? Here's Where Edward Snowden Should Look for Work in Russia ]
The gentleman geek leaker's flight to a Moscow transit lounge and the US administration's club-footed response to it, at once strident and impotent, handed Putin the unexpected role of reasonable, temperate world leader and dare one say it, defender of free speech. Meanwhile Obama fans across the globe learned what drone-struck Pakistani villagers and massively deported aliens already knew: Their hero can be as harsh as any other American president when it comes to national security, or issues that the Beltway consensus defines as national security.
[More from Minyanville.com : Technology: Federal Government Agencies to Pump Billions Into Clouds ]
Whatever one thinks of Putin, no one with an ironic, smart-alecky journalist's gene in their body could help relishing the topsy-turvy spectacle. It did not last long, however.
[More from Minyanville.com : With Google Glass, iWatch -- and Now a Microsoft Smartwatch?-- the Tech Industry Overestimates Itself ]
Putin and the Russian regime showed their true colors flagrantly last week by convicting blogger-turned-activist Alexei Navalny on baseless corruption charges and sentencing him to five years in prison. Asked about a possible pardon for the popular Navalny, Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov added a Dostoyevskian touch to the proceedings. "A convict must first admit his guilt," he remarked.
[More from Minyanville.com : High Fashion, Low Function: With Google Glass and iWatch, the Tech Industry Overestimates Itself ]
Navalny will surely be blithely compared to Russia's most famous sitting political prisoner, former Yukos Oil CEO Mikhail Khodorkovsky, who has been in jail since 2004. But the current miscarriage of justice is much more blatant. Khodorkovsky was a buccaneer billionaire who, if he did not actually break the tax and fiduciary statutes on which he was tried, certainly bent them aggressively for enormous personal gain. He was the noisiest of a group of oligarchs who maintained absurdly low oil and natural resource taxes by more or less openly bribing parliament, depriving the state of funds legitimately needed for starving pensioners and teachers. Khodorkovsky boasted not long before his legal travail started that he personally controlled 20% of the Duma, Russia's legislature.
Navalny is a much more classic dissident. A lawyer by training, he started a blog several years ago focused on uncovering corruption in Russia's graft-ridden state-owned corporations. The site was a runaway success, turning Navalny into a sort of hipster celebrity for Russia's more market-savvy malcontents.
Tall and good-looking, the 37-year-old Navalny grasped for a bigger audience when middle-class Russians started marching en masse to protest heavily managed Duma elections in the summer of 2011. A not entirely likeable ego emerged at this stage, but the blogger did give a telegenic new face to the inchoate protest movement, and some hope that Russia might produce a different sort of leader at some point in the future. This, of course, was just what made him a marked man for the Kremlin incumbents, who launched a series of Mickey Mouse legal investigations according to a now familiar script.

PAGE 1 OF 2
District 1 News and Blues

Phoenix, AZ

#51 Jul 22, 2013
Vladimir Putin Blows Edward Snowden
PR Coup With Navalny Conviction
By Craig Mellow | Minyanville
3 hours ago

For a minute or two there, Vladimir Putin looked better on the world stage than Barack Obama. The agent for this image miracle -- one the Kremlin's highly paid Western PR firms have pursued for many years completely in vain -- was, of course, Edward Snowden.
[More from Minyanville.com : After Asylum, the Job Hunt? Here's Where Edward Snowden Should Look for Work in Russia ]
The gentleman geek leaker's flight to a Moscow transit lounge and the US administration's club-footed response to it, at once strident and impotent, handed Putin the unexpected role of reasonable, temperate world leader and dare one say it, defender of free speech. Meanwhile Obama fans across the globe learned what drone-struck Pakistani villagers and massively deported aliens already knew: Their hero can be as harsh as any other American president when it comes to national security, or issues that the Beltway consensus defines as national security.
[More from Minyanville.com : Technology: Federal Government Agencies to Pump Billions Into Clouds ]
Whatever one thinks of Putin, no one with an ironic, smart-alecky journalist's gene in their body could help relishing the topsy-turvy spectacle. It did not last long, however.
[More from Minyanville.com : With Google Glass, iWatch -- and Now a Microsoft Smartwatch?-- the Tech Industry Overestimates Itself ]
Putin and the Russian regime showed their true colors flagrantly last week by convicting blogger-turned-activist Alexei Navalny on baseless corruption charges and sentencing him to five years in prison. Asked about a possible pardon for the popular Navalny, Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov added a Dostoyevskian touch to the proceedings. "A convict must first admit his guilt," he remarked.
[More from Minyanville.com : High Fashion, Low Function: With Google Glass and iWatch, the Tech Industry Overestimates Itself ]
Navalny will surely be blithely compared to Russia's most famous sitting political prisoner, former Yukos Oil CEO Mikhail Khodorkovsky, who has been in jail since 2004. But the current miscarriage of justice is much more blatant. Khodorkovsky was a buccaneer billionaire who, if he did not actually break the tax and fiduciary statutes on which he was tried, certainly bent them aggressively for enormous personal gain. He was the noisiest of a group of oligarchs who maintained absurdly low oil and natural resource taxes by more or less openly bribing parliament, depriving the state of funds legitimately needed for starving pensioners and teachers. Khodorkovsky boasted not long before his legal travail started that he personally controlled 20% of the Duma, Russia's legislature.
Navalny is a much more classic dissident. A lawyer by training, he started a blog several years ago focused on uncovering corruption in Russia's graft-ridden state-owned corporations. The site was a runaway success, turning Navalny into a sort of hipster celebrity for Russia's more market-savvy malcontents.
Tall and good-looking, the 37-year-old Navalny grasped for a bigger audience when middle-class Russians started marching en masse to protest heavily managed Duma elections in the summer of 2011. A not entirely likeable ego emerged at this stage, but the blogger did give a telegenic new face to the inchoate protest movement, and some hope that Russia might produce a different sort of leader at some point in the future. This, of course, was just what made him a marked man for the Kremlin incumbents, who launched a series of Mickey Mouse legal investigations according to a now familiar script.
PART 1 OF 2
District 1 News and Blues

Phoenix, AZ

#52 Jul 22, 2013
Part 2 of 2
Tall and good-looking, the 37-year-old Navalny grasped for a bigger audience when middle-class Russians started marching en masse to protest heavily managed Duma elections in the summer of 2011. A not entirely likeable ego emerged at this stage, but the blogger did give a telegenic new face to the inchoate protest movement, and some hope that Russia might produce a different sort of leader at some point in the future. This, of course, was just what made him a marked man for the Kremlin incumbents, who launched a series of Mickey Mouse legal investigations according to a now familiar script.
So why should investors care? There is a school of thought, often persuasive, that authoritarian oppression in distant markets is unfortunate but irrelevant to the cold calculations of money men and women. India's democracy has not produced better economic results than China's goulash Communism. Russia has wonderful sovereign debt fundamentals, oil prices are rising again, and Russian stocks look chronically undervalued. Why worry about one meddlesome publisher?
That argument might hold water if Navalny were a traditional human rights campaigner dealing in issues that are far from the average citizen's bread and butter. But his focus is on state corruption, where politics increasingly meets economics, and not only in Russia. Ai Weiwei, the Chinese artist who is thought of as a campaigner for free expression, actually earned his jail term in the same territory, uncovering official thievery after an earthquake in Sichuan province.
Corruption is the great lead weight around the ankles of Russia and most other emerging markets, the essence perhaps of what keeps them emerging, and citizens increasingly understand it. A recent survey of Russians found freedom and human rights way down the list of popular concerns and worries, whereas corruption was No. 3 right behind inflation and unemployment.
If Putin were really acting in his nation's interest, as all leaders always insist they are, he would have embraced Navalny, and drafted him as a special prosecutor to muck out the Russian state's manure-choked stables, or at least detailed professional men and women of the law to follow up his printed allegations. But what Putin obviously cares about at this point is maintaining power, and power that rests upon the very layers of filth that are stifling his nation's development. Alas investors need to care about that.
The Kremlin did make one very interesting miscalculation in the Navalny case, though. It set the defendant free pending an appeal, which presumably will give him time to pursue his declared candidacy for mayor of Moscow. It looks like Putin's people may be arrogant enough to assume Navalny will get nowhere in the campaign, and the current colorless appointee Sergei Sobyanin will legitimize himself with a landslide. I wouldn't bet on it, though.
district 1 an a 2

Phoenix, AZ

#53 Jul 23, 2013
...
http://news.yahoo.com/edward-snowden-everythi...
....
Edward Snowden Has Everything and Nothing
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Abby Ohlheiser 9 hours ago
National Security Agency
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Edward Snowden Has Everything and Nothing
Edward Snowden, the NSA leaker who has been formally charged with espionage by the U.S. government, was the subject of an anonymously sourced story at CNN on Monday that, among other things, pushes back it the idea that Snowden was able to obtain the inner secrets of the surveillance agency. It's apparently in direct response to journalist Glenn Greenwald's earlier claim that Snowden had the "blueprint" for the agency at his fingertips. "Just because you have the blueprints doesn't mean you have the manual," the anonymous official told CNN, while floating the idea that the former contractor for the agency might not know what to do with what he has.
RELATED: Here Comes the Glenn Greenwald Hit Piece
Earlier this month, Greenwald outlined the scope of Snowden's NSA stash, indicating that the whistleblower had refused to release some of the most sensitive information in his hands, based on what he described as Snowden's "careful and judicious journalistic test weighing public interest versus harm." That information includes the "blueprint" for the NSA,(which, contra the anonymous CNN source's zing, Greenwald also described as an "instruction manual"). So now that Greenwald and Snowden's version of events are out there, the U.S. is pushing back.
RELATED: Glenn Greenwald Will Write a Book on Snowden and the NSA
To be clear, it doesn't seem like either agency is denying that Snowden's data grab contains sensitive information. Citing an internal review, the official said that first, Snowden didn't access something called ECI, or "extremely compartmentalized information," but instead pulled a whole bunch of information at once from an area of the NSA's computer system in which a large amount of sensitive information was concentrated. And second, the official apparently insinuated that Snowden might not know what to do with the information he has, or as CNN put it, "A key question is whether Snowden, a former NSA contractor, really knows how the programs work at a detailed technical level."
RELATED: How the Washington Post Lost the PRISM Exclusive
While Snowden has previously been described as highly skilled hence his ability to access the information he leaked to Greenwald et al. the incompetency argument seen here isn't new. Rep. Mike Rogers, the chair of the House Intelligence Committee, raised doubts about Snowden's abilities back in June:
"He clearly has over-inflated his position, he has over-inflated his access and he's even over-inflated what the actually technology of the programs would allow one to do. It's impossible for him to do what he was saying he could do."
Meanwhile, the fallout from the leaks might speak for themselves. Snowden, seen in the CNN piece as overstating his reach and, by doing so, giving sensitive information to terrorists, has also started to usefully change the way some Americans look at and use the internet. But the point addressed by the anonymous official whether Snowden has the agency's deepest secrets, and whether he knows what to do with them is in a way moot, assuming his previous promise not to release the most sensitive stuff he has stands. But it's clear that Snowden (and now, some lawmakers) knows way more than what we've seen so far. At this point, the NSA, just like everyone else, may just have to wait else he ends up making public.
BS Balls

Mililani, HI

#54 Jul 23, 2013
Joe Balls wrote:
<quoted text> I don't care if the Government eavesdrops, but I don't want a scumsucker like Obama to have have anything to do with it. He isn't interested in catching terrorists, he's their shill in America. He's the peeper that was caught looking into windows, the guy that was blowing guys in his limo. Michelle has no class either, just for putting up with him.
As usual more useless garbage coming from the bigmouth haole JBalls from Waianae. This guy claims to have shed blood for America in some war he was involved in. Claiming a military career starting in WWII,Korea,Vietnam, and the gulf war yet he is collecting a small disability from us taxpayers and no mention of a retirement for all these years of service. He also posted a comment to Lolo that they have contacted him about using his specialized skills as a mercenary in Africa. This guy is nothing but a free loader and a pathological liar. Anytime he posts a comment it is pure fiction. When you support your family by buying illegal food stamps you know this turd has 2 faces and is a liar.

Joe Balls

Since: May 11

Location hidden

#55 Jul 23, 2013
Snowden wants to write a book? How is he going to do that? Will it be a book about how he can't tell us anything because it's classified? Or will he tell stuff in the book that will get him killed, which is what they want to do anyways. One would be boring and not sell, the other way, he'll be dead. I'd really like to hear all the juicy details of what he knows about Obama, but they are going to JFK this thing to the max.

Since: Feb 08

Honolulu, HI

#56 Jul 24, 2013
Greenwald has a book deal in the works. We don't know how much stuff Snowden gave to him and whether the decryption key was provided. Even if Snowden stops leaking while in Russia, who's going to stop the journalists to whom he gave encrypted documents? The encryption keys can be broken.

I find it interesting that Vladimir Putin is a former KGB operative.
District 1 an a 2 and a 3

Phoenix, AZ

#57 Jul 24, 2013
ETA136 wrote:
<quoted text>
I may be a mealy mouthed worker, but I still have my job and Snowden doesn't. I collect a paycheck and Snowden doesn't. I have freedom of movement and Snowden doesn't. My passport is valid and Snowden's isn't. Would I like to be in Snowden's shoes? Not in a million years...
That isn't the question ETA136.
The answer is you couldn't make the tough choice if you were put in the same position as Snowden. We have doer's and workers and both should receive credit for what they do.

Most of us can work a job while few put their own life on the line for country.

Joe Balls

Since: May 11

Location hidden

#58 Jul 24, 2013
ETA136 wrote:
Greenwald has a book deal in the works. We don't know how much stuff Snowden gave to him and whether the decryption key was provided. Even if Snowden stops leaking while in Russia, who's going to stop the journalists to whom he gave encrypted documents? The encryption keys can be broken.
I find it interesting that Vladimir Putin is a former KGB operative.
Ecryption keys can be broken, but it's not easy. I worked on one for three or four years and only made a little progress. We had hundreds of people, each working on one small block of code at a time. I was successful on only three or four blocks of code in all that time. Years later I heard it had finally been broken, but it took several years after I was gone, and we had literally a thousand computers working on it 24-7. By the time it was finally broken, it had already been obsolete for years. One guy I worked with lives in Texas and still does it, and has been working on the current code for at least twelve years now, and still hasn't broken it. I doubt a reporter has that kind of resources available to him.
Guru

Phoenix, AZ

#59 Jul 24, 2013
Joe Balls wrote:
<quoted text>
Ecryption keys can be broken, but it's not easy. I worked on one for three or four years and only made a little progress. We had hundreds of people, each working on one small block of code at a time. I was successful on only three or four blocks of code in all that time. Years later I heard it had finally been broken, but it took several years after I was gone, and we had literally a thousand computers working on it 24-7. By the time it was finally broken, it had already been obsolete for years. One guy I worked with lives in Texas and still does it, and has been working on the current code for at least twelve years now, and still hasn't broken it. I doubt a reporter has that kind of resources available to him.
Chuckle of the Month......joey you're killing me cut back on the meds. At least you're not boring today.

Joe Balls

Since: May 11

Location hidden

#60 Jul 24, 2013
You know nothing of the life I led. You're just an internet moron troll.
Francine

Mililani, HI

#61 Jul 24, 2013
Joe Balls wrote:
<quoted text>
Ecryption keys can be broken, but it's not easy. I worked on one for three or four years and only made a little progress. We had hundreds of people, each working on one small block of code at a time. I was successful on only three or four blocks of code in all that time. Years later I heard it had finally been broken, but it took several years after I was gone, and we had literally a thousand computers working on it 24-7. By the time it was finally broken, it had already been obsolete for years. One guy I worked with lives in Texas and still does it, and has been working on the current code for at least twelve years now, and still hasn't broken it. I doubt a reporter has that kind of resources available to him.
The only code you have broken is a food stamp EBT card when you falsely pose as the person assigned to that pin number. You really make a azz out of yourself trying to make us readers believe you have some specialty military skills when you were just a flunky. You entered as a buck private and exited as the same rank. Claiming some war injury you received so us taxpayers have to pay you and at the same time ripping us off by buying illegal food stamps. The only thing you and Snowden have is your a chronic rat fink then and now. Just ask any cop in Waianae and they will confirm that as the truth.
JRB

Leander, TX

#63 Jul 24, 2013
Guru wrote:
<quoted text>
Chuckle of the Month......joey you're killing me cut back on the meds. At least you're not boring today.
Well it's not like he's claiming to be a double aught spy. Though I can see how his comments might sound amazing to a retail associate or a city functionary.

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