Oscar-Winning Song Hits Angry Chord

Full story: The Washington Post

Washington Post Staff Writer Tuesday, March 7, 2006; Page B03 When Christine Smith heard the song "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp" announced as the Oscar winner for best original song on Sunday night's telecast, ...
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Question Man

Burleson, TX

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#24
Jun 15, 2006
 
amr wrote:
<quoted text>
Got that right Hommie, invented it and control it. Through your life and beyond. Power to the eye ! WASP will never die !
I would strongly suggest you start learning CANTONESE. I have also seen the son of the LIGHT in the EASTERN SKY.
Question Man

Dallas, TX

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#26
Jun 20, 2006
 
BWIJ at work wrote:
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I understand what you're saying and I agree to a point. However, it cannot be overlooked that lots if not most of the monetary support for "gangsta rap" comes from young white males.(Note: I passingly read this statistic somewhere...I'll look for a source for it, as I hate simply quoting stuff without having much to back it up.) Otherwise, I think that African-Americans get positive attention for negative things such as songs about sex and drugs, b/c that's what America expects from us. So when other artists try to broaden their horizons beyond these topics, they aren't given any attention b/c they don't fit that nice little box someone else has already defined for us. No one will really even take them seriously! It's the same for any traditional role in society. Take men's traditional sex roles for example. As soon as a man steps out of what has been traditionally defined as being normal for him (i.e. sports, macho attitudes), he is regarded negatively or insulted as being a fag or less than a man. I simply want people to stop trying to define everyone else and view people as unique individuals united in the strongest connection of all: humanity. Is that too much to ask for? Judging from the way the world is acting...I guess the answer is yes.(Yet another sigh)
Oh yeah, I agree with you on the double standard issue. I feel that there shouldn't be terms such as African-Americans, or Asian-Americans or Insert any Ethnicity here-Americans. However, sometimes it can't be helped because people don't wish to feel as if they are forsaking their ethnicity or "selling out their race". For whites its easier b/c as the majority you guys were able to traditionally define American as being...for white males and then later on for white females. 1.)Thus, you don't feel the need to say, "I'm European-American," b/c somewhere along the way the two words became interchangable. However, as America is made of a number of differing people, I believe that everyone living here that genuinely loves this country and works for it's glory can fit under the umbrella of America...without having to put ethnicity in front of it. Before I'm black, I'm human and this human lives in a great country. God bless it.
*Side note: Please also note that I wouldn't emphasize my race so much as being such a significant part of me, if I weren't made to feel as if I were different (and thus lower) because of it in the first place. Primarily it's simply another part of me just like the fact that I'm female and I like cats. But out of defense of it, became a much bigger deal than it should be.
American...Black Woman in Japan (I guess it's time for a screen change)
1.)(Note: DuBois covers some of this in his essays about double-consciousness.
Most Americans were at first appalled by rock'n roll, which was dubbed as "N word" or race music, but as its popularity,influence and profitability grew it conveniently became an American art form copied by white artists. Just as the blues and jazz have conveniently become an American art form copied by white artists. Double standard? Rap music because of its popularity and profitability will also become an American art form, especially if they can find a few more Vanilla Ice proteges. And they are all American VALUES, black folks are not writing the big checks these artists receive nor are they profiting as richly as those, who write the checks. Also the black people who were rescued after Hurricane Katrina, were called REFUGEES, not American citizens. And don't you dare change your SCREEN NAME.
Jey

Columbus, OH

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#27
Jun 21, 2006
 
BWIJ at work wrote:
Something that's always bothered me. Why is it that we only get positive attention for negative things? Being able to freestyle is such a beautiful talent. I sure as hell don't have it, and that's why I respect it so much when I see it in others. So when it's used to talk about nothing but prostitution and bitches and hoes, and stayin in the game, and hustling, I get angry, because there are so many other talented rap artists out there who didn't sell out as much as others to sell records. Why didn't Nas ever get an Oscar, or Talik Kwali, or The Roots, or Busta...(so intelligent), or Arrested Development, or Common, or Tupac? It simply shows us where American values lie.
Black Woman In Japan
I love your brain power.....
P.S.*Talib* Kwali
Jey

Columbus, OH

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#28
Jun 21, 2006
 
BWIJ at work wrote:
<quoted text>
I understand what you're saying and I agree to a point. However, it cannot be overlooked that lots if not most of the monetary support for "gangsta rap" comes from young white males.(Note: I passingly read this statistic somewhere...I'll look for a source for it, as I hate simply quoting stuff without having much to back it up.) Otherwise, I think that African-Americans get positive attention for negative things such as songs about sex and drugs, b/c that's what America expects from us. So when other artists try to broaden their horizons beyond these topics, they aren't given any attention b/c they don't fit that nice little box someone else has already defined for us. No one will really even take them seriously! It's the same for any traditional role in society. Take men's traditional sex roles for example. As soon as a man steps out of what has been traditionally defined as being normal for him (i.e. sports, macho attitudes), he is regarded negatively or insulted as being a fag or less than a man. I simply want people to stop trying to define everyone else and view people as unique individuals united in the strongest connection of all: humanity. Is that too much to ask for? Judging from the way the world is acting...I guess the answer is yes.(Yet another sigh)
Oh yeah, I agree with you on the double standard issue. I feel that there shouldn't be terms such as African-Americans, or Asian-Americans or Insert any Ethnicity here-Americans. However, sometimes it can't be helped because people don't wish to feel as if they are forsaking their ethnicity or "selling out their race". For whites its easier b/c as the majority you guys were able to traditionally define American as being...for white males and then later on for white females. 1.)Thus, you don't feel the need to say, "I'm European-American," b/c somewhere along the way the two words became interchangable. However, as America is made of a number of differing people, I believe that everyone living here that genuinely loves this country and works for it's glory can fit under the umbrella of America...without having to put ethnicity in front of it. Before I'm black, I'm human and this human lives in a great country. God bless it.
*Side note: Please also note that I wouldn't emphasize my race so much as being such a significant part of me, if I weren't made to feel as if I were different (and thus lower) because of it in the first place. Primarily it's simply another part of me just like the fact that I'm female and I like cats. But out of defense of it, became a much bigger deal than it should be.
American...Black Woman in Japan (I guess it's time for a screen change)
1.)(Note: DuBois covers some of this in his essays about double-consciousness.
DuBois's book 'Souls of black folk' speaks on it a little
LC in Alabama

United States

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#29
Jun 21, 2006
 
daisy lee myers wrote:
i predicted "hustle & flow" WOULD GET A NOD FROM oscar and the music too.
it reminded me of the days of "superfly."
I agree.
okgirl

United States

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#30
Sep 8, 2006
 
you all are missing the point. first of all tupac did not desrve an oscar, he had mad talent, and all he wanted to do was talk about everybody, threaten biggy and diddy and taunt people. his talent was great but wasted. i see what you all are saying about three six mafia, but dang, did you see and or hear the other nominees? the songs did not fit the movies and they in lack of a better word, suckeddddddddddddddd. at least three six mafia's song talked about hard ships and some trying to get away from something bad to get something good. YEah it was about prostitution, but if you see the movie, and then listen to the song, the oscar was well deserved its about time somebody worth winning won something. Didn't hear ya'll getting upset whe Halle berry won for show titties and butt cheeks.
he llo

Senegal

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#32
Feb 7, 2007
 
Hello
My name is miss vivian fred i saw your profile today and became intrested in you,i will also like to know you more,and i want you to send an email to my email address so i can give you my picture, for you to know whom i am.
Here is my email address( vivian200fred@yahoo.com) believe we can move from here!
I am waiting for your mail to my email address above.
vivian.
(Remeber the distance or colour does not matter but love matters alot in life)

(lvivi200fred@yahoo.com)
sweetcocoa

United States

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#33
Nov 29, 2012
 
They earned it

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