Private natural gas well
Kimmi Jo

Minford, OH

#386 Feb 22, 2009
Bill wrote:
<quoted text>If you have an open casing ,the well is most likely loaded up with fluid. I would suggest you talk to your neighbor and look at the type of setup he has. He must have had it serviced sometime so he could probably give you contacts . The well will need swabbed .If the casing is bent too much that will have to be straighted in order to swab.They can cut the bad section out and weld a new piece. This can run into a lot of money but you would eventually get a payback in heat savings. I would first have someone look at the casing and get it swabbed and repaired . Put a gage on it and see what type of pressure you have.Probably your neighbor would be most helpful, but remember wells this far apart can be very different. He can at least tell you where some service people are. You could also ride around and look for some wells that are in production. Get the name of the company and contact them. They could either advise you on people to fix the well or maybe they would be interested in leasing it. Don't selll it just lease the rights. Average lease would give you 12 1/2% royalty and free heat. They will want to limit free heat per year see what they offer
Hi! Thanks for the info! I think what was broken off was the "regulator". It looked like it had a gauge type thing on it that was broken off, too. I have been trying to find people in my area that know something/ANYTHING about gas wells. So far, NO good. ANYONE out there familiar with southern Ohio? At this point, I need all the help I can get. The people that had the gas well down the road from me no longer live there. In fact, there isnt any houses there at all now, so asking my neighbors is out of the question. HELP!!
No More Gas Bills

AOL

#387 Feb 23, 2009
I had the same issues as many of the posters here.(Bought a house with a private gas well that needed hooked back up to the house, pipe was broken off at the casing, etc, etc.)

After many many phone calls to different gas companies, one finally suggested that I call a plumber.

A local plumber gave me the contact name of a person to service and determine the viability of the well. Once that was done, the plumber did the hook up. He even set me up with a person who dug the trench for the gas line from the well to the house.

Been using free gas for three months now.

So I will pass along the same advice...call a plumber and see if they can give you the specific information you need such as contacts for someone to service your well, quotes on how much it will cost to hook you up, and so on.

It cost me approx $1,500 to get hooked up to the well, which basically has paid itself off already.(My neighbors gas bills have all been well over $400/mo.)
Nad Radical

Cheyenne, WY

#388 Feb 23, 2009
You only need maybe 10 psi to run your house. An average house will burn about 6000 to 10,000 cubic feet of gas a month. Gas quality also is a question you need to answer.
peasetd wrote:
<quoted text> Been drilling for water here in ohio and hit gas, but how much do we actually need to be able to run the heat in the house? How many psi in other words? It seems that the well drillers don't want to deal with it and drill through for water what should I do? thanks
Bill

United States

#389 Feb 26, 2009
Kimmi, the part sticking out of the ground should be about 4 inches in diameter is that broken or is a smaller pipe connnected to it broken off.Are there any producing wells in your area?
driver

Virgie, KY

#390 Feb 27, 2009
we are selling gas now how is it bought by the cubic foot or how? and how much is natural gas
Bill

United States

#391 Feb 27, 2009
driver wrote:
we are selling gas now how is it bought by the cubic foot or how? and how much is natural gas
That will vary depending on the market you are selling in. Measurment is called MFC = 1000 cu ft. Last month we got 7.56 per MCF. Early fall it was almost 11.00
Kimmi Jo

Minford, OH

#392 Feb 27, 2009
Bill wrote:
Kimmi, the part sticking out of the ground should be about 4 inches in diameter is that broken or is a smaller pipe connnected to it broken off.Are there any producing wells in your area?
BOTH are broken of. The smaller pipe and the thing that looks like a pressure cooker gauge. I wish I knew someone in MY area that had the parts/know how to fix it. Honestly, because I am "female", people look at me like I am retarded. YES, there is a well or two within a mile from my property. I dont know the peoples names but they have had the well for many years. If you look at the "natural gas map locations" in southern Ohio, you'll see "sand rocks". Those rocks are on my property. Just about the only place in southern Ohio that has gas is ON or beside my property. I REALLY need all the help & info I can get. Thanks very much.....
John Kennedy

Centerville, UT

#393 Feb 28, 2009
Bill wrote:
John, sometimes a drip tank seems to not be necessary but it is good to have. If there is any possibility of your well bringing up water with the gas then you should have a drip tank. It simply catches the water so it will not go into your lines. I have read of people on this forum making them, but a factory tank is much more complicated that just a empty tank. Inside there is a valve and a shutoff that acts much like the tank in your commode if the water gets too high the valve shuts off flow into the line.Every so often you open a valve and blow any accumulated moisture out of tank.I know they say that gas is odorless. The gas that comes from the wells in our area has some odor, maybe that is because of the formation it comes from, but because of this we don't worry about it. I would be interested to hear from others on this forum to see if they really have odorless gas or if there is some smell to it.
Bill I have access to a drip tank know I am trying to get my hands on a pancake regulator. Is there a different name they call this. My friend is in pluming and heating and he says he does not know what that is. What should the pressure at the valve on my gas well be to run my furnace and water heater? Thanks again bill
Bill

United States

#394 Mar 1, 2009
Kimmi, I am not sure what is broken at your well, but this is what I suggest.Google oilfield supplies Ohio there are a lot of listings ,just check them out for one closest to you. If the well is open it will need pumped out and shut in to build pressure. If the 4 inch casing is bent it will need repaired before they can swab. I suspect your well is probably too deep for a water well contractor to help but maybe he can refer you.I would first repair the casing and have the well cleaned before I spent more time and money on lines,regulators,etc.It will be hard to find someone in your area if there are no commercial wells operating. Cost for these repairs would be expensive.Try the Google search.
Bill

United States

#395 Mar 1, 2009
John Kennedy wrote:
<quoted text>Bill I have access to a drip tank know I am trying to get my hands on a pancake regulator. Is there a different name they call this. My friend is in pluming and heating and he says he does not know what that is. What should the pressure at the valve on my gas well be to run my furnace and water heater? Thanks again bill
We call them pancake because of the configuration. They are round and thin with a protrusion on the side that has a plunger . When the pressure drops too low the plunger closes so that when the gas comes back it will not go into the house without you resetting the plunger. These regulators are located just before the line enters the home. I recall someone on this forum saying that they bought one at either Home Depot or Lowes.The other types of regulators such as a Big Jo or Little Jo are Cylindrical about 3 inches in dia. and 10inches long, these are located at the well head. You would only need these if your pressure is high. We install them in steps .If a well has over 600lbs we put a Big Jo then a Little Jo. Then the line and finally Pancake at the home. If your pressure is over 40lbs and under 600 a Little Jo is sufficient. The pancake reduces pressure to ounces . What is important is how fast the well replenishes what is used. In theory 10 or 15lbs could run a home but probably won't because you will use the gas faster than new gas comes into the casing.I suggest going slow such as vent free logs or a space heater until you determine how good the well is. If you already have city gas then you can just switch between your well and the utility.
John Kennedy

Centerville, UT

#396 Mar 1, 2009
Bill wrote:
<quoted text>We call them pancake because of the configuration. They are round and thin with a protrusion on the side that has a plunger . When the pressure drops too low the plunger closes so that when the gas comes back it will not go into the house without you resetting the plunger. These regulators are located just before the line enters the home. I recall someone on this forum saying that they bought one at either Home Depot or Lowes.The other types of regulators such as a Big Jo or Little Jo are Cylindrical about 3 inches in dia. and 10inches long, these are located at the well head. You would only need these if your pressure is high. We install them in steps .If a well has over 600lbs we put a Big Jo then a Little Jo. Then the line and finally Pancake at the home. If your pressure is over 40lbs and under 600 a Little Jo is sufficient. The pancake reduces pressure to ounces . What is important is how fast the well replenishes what is used. In theory 10 or 15lbs could run a home but probably won't because you will use the gas faster than new gas comes into the casing.I suggest going slow such as vent free logs or a space heater until you determine how good the well is. If you already have city gas then you can just switch between your well and the utility.
Bill would it be a good idea to fill a tank like a big propane tank to store the gas that comes in so it can stay up with the amount of gas you use in the house? An thanks again I do not know alot about this so thanks for helping.
Bill

United States

#397 Mar 2, 2009
John Kennedy wrote:
<quoted text>Bill would it be a good idea to fill a tank like a big propane tank to store the gas that comes in so it can stay up with the amount of gas you use in the house? An thanks again I do not know alot about this so thanks for helping.
I don't think that would make too much difference. You would have to have a huge tank and unless you had a way to compress the gas ,you could only fill it to the pressure that is in the well at the time of filling.
driver

Virgie, KY

#398 Mar 4, 2009
once you start selling how long before you recieve first check we started selling in feb havent seen anything yet just wondering.
Bill

United States

#399 Mar 4, 2009
driver wrote:
once you start selling how long before you recieve first check we started selling in feb havent seen anything yet just wondering.
That should be in your contract. I am sure it varies with different buyers. Charts or meters must be read and the paperwork takes time.I would guess 3 or 4 months from the time the well is turned on you will receive your first check. Then you should receive a check every month but it will be for production 3 or 4 months earlier.
rock doctor

Mesquite, TX

#400 Mar 6, 2009
Kimmi Jo wrote:
<quoted text>BOTH are broken of. The smaller pipe and the thing that looks like a pressure cooker gauge. I wish I knew someone in MY area that had the parts/know how to fix it. Honestly, because I am "female", people look at me like I am retarded. YES, there is a well or two within a mile from my property. I dont know the peoples names but they have had the well for many years. If you look at the "natural gas map locations" in southern Ohio, you'll see "sand rocks". Those rocks are on my property. Just about the only place in southern Ohio that has gas is ON or beside my property. I REALLY need all the help & info I can get. Thanks very much.....
Kimmi follow this link: http://www.newarkcampus.org/professional/osu/...
You will see a map of Ohio oil and gas Field trends.
The oil and gas geology of Ohio has been studied to a great extent. With some effort you can learn a lot about the gas field on your property.
some first line resources are 1)Univ. of Ohio geological publications, 2)the state agency that regulates oil/gas in ohio, 3)find a list of petroleum geologists (usually registered by the state) one is likely to help you. The assessment of your resource will start with understanding the geology.

Since: Jan 08

Cleveland, OH

#401 Mar 18, 2009
Bill wrote:
... I would be interested to hear from others on this forum to see if they really have odorless gas or if there is some smell to it.
Hi Bill,

My gas has a very distinct sharp smell. Even though I feel much safer now that we moved the regulator outside the basement I also installed a natural gas detector in the basement.

Here's the "drip tank" and "little joe" at the well head:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2068/217886351...

Here's the pancake regulator at the house with the meter connected to set the pressure going inside to the correct amount.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2161/217886350...

Best wishes,

Steve
Bill

Mount Gilead, OH

#402 Mar 19, 2009
Hi Bill,
My gas has a very distinct sharp smell. Even though I feel much safer now that we moved the regulator outside the basement I also installed a natural gas detector in the basement.
Thanks for the infomation. All of the wells I have seen have some odor to the gas.That is a nice installation you have.
Marlene

Rochester, NY

#403 Mar 20, 2009
Joe wrote:
Hi does anyone in this forum work on small private natural gas wells? I have a bunch of questions.
Did you get answers? A company has offered a lease on my property. I'm trying to determine if the payoff is worth all the negatives.
Bill

Cardington, OH

#404 Mar 22, 2009
Marlene wrote:
<quoted text>
Did you get answers? A company has offered a lease on my property. I'm trying to determine if the payoff is worth all the negatives.
You have no monetary risk and stand to receive a roality and probably free heat.I would consider that a good payoff. There should be no negatives if the lease is properly drawn. Maybe you should take the lease to an attorney that specializes in such matters.He could answer all of your questions and make suggestions. Time would be less than a hour.Make sure he is expirenced in this field.
What negatives are you thinking about?

Since: Apr 09

Bayside, NY

#406 Apr 2, 2009
any one know where to get good quality gas parts in north west ohio for my gas well

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