Can we reverse the damaging suburbani...

Can we reverse the damaging suburbanization of America?

There are 12 comments on the Asheville Citizen-Times story from Feb 19, 2009, titled Can we reverse the damaging suburbanization of America?. In it, Asheville Citizen-Times reports that:

Most Americans would agree that the creation of the suburban way of life is one of our proudest accomplishments as a people.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Asheville Citizen-Times.

local

Hickory, NC

#1 Feb 19, 2009
Well, if you are 'talking locally', sir, let me remind you that not so long ago this area was mostly rural land and there were hundreds of wonderful farms in the area.

The the transplants came...
paul varner

United States

#2 Feb 19, 2009
"reverse suburbanization" is do-able , if one accepts fewer freedoms.

the author listed problems, but was woefully short on solultions. An underlying problem not-listed was the philosophical problem that Americans first need to deal with, and that philosophical problem is "what do we mean and want by the term 'freedom', and how limited should 'freedom' be".

Further, there is the underlying religious understanding that must come into play here, on as broad a field as possible. I believe that God commanded Adam (and hence all mankind) to "subdue Creation". "Subdue" does not mean "destroy" , nor does it mean "manipulate", nor does it mean "exploit". We are to make Creation work for us, but we are to do so in a God-honoring fashion. And we should do so to make it work for all future generations.

These considerations will inevitably drive one to this point: "there must be civil land management". At the smallest level , this might mean things like "zoning". But this is not just "zoning". This is "Societies (local, regional and national) determining a land-management plan and enforcing it".

This is where Atlanta has failed in it's growth, and why specifically Atlanta had to beg for water.

American people don't like the idea of "limited freedoms". But to solve the problems of suburbanization, "Limited freedoms" and "Social Land Management" is where it must start.
Thunder Chicken

Hickory, NC

#3 Feb 19, 2009
local wrote:
Well, if you are 'talking locally', sir, let me remind you that not so long ago this area was mostly rural land and there were hundreds of wonderful farms in the area.
The the transplants came...
Certainly aren't any 'locals' out in the burbs. Nope. Only Yankee transplants. All the local folks are farmers.
high clitts of carolina

Hendersonville, NC

#4 Feb 19, 2009
we have plenty of cash
to bild our tiger wuuds goff course which
we will irrigate with treeted sewage.
Avl Dao

Hickory, NC

#5 Feb 19, 2009
Mr. Hogstrom has jam-packed many important topics into a single piece, too many to comment on in this tiny space. I'll emphasize that our economic and real estate crisis has, fortunately, killed off many bad proposed projects and economic practices. It will take a few more years of thrashing about in this downturn before even more financially and environmentally unsustainable projects and practices die-off.
The economy that eventually re-emerges, x years later, will not resemble the debt-fueled and ‘real estate-flipping’ economy that's cratering today.

Best of all it will force us, perhaps kicking & screaming in resistance, to creatively adapt and re-use much of today's existing mis-built environment of highways, excessive strip malls and ill-planned suburban as well as many ill-planned urban areas.

This will be such a monumental national job that IT should have been a goal of a better-conceived Economic Recovery Plan by dems and Obama.
MikeLovell

Eddyville, KY

#6 Feb 19, 2009
Liberals, who come up with these idiot ideas, can do something useful by being ground up and used to make my half acre suburban lawn a little greener.
paul varner

United States

#7 Feb 19, 2009
Avl Dao wrote:
Mr. Hogstrom has jam-packed many important topics into a single piece, too many to comment on in this tiny space. I'll emphasize that our economic and real estate crisis has, fortunately, killed off many bad proposed projects and economic practices. It will take a few more years of thrashing about in this downturn before even more financially and environmentally unsustainable projects and practices die-off.
The economy that eventually re-emerges, x years later, will not resemble the debt-fueled and ‘real estate-flipping’ economy that's cratering today.
Best of all it will force us, perhaps kicking & screaming in resistance, to creatively adapt and re-use much of today's existing mis-built environment of highways, excessive strip malls and ill-planned suburban as well as many ill-planned urban areas.
This will be such a monumental national job that IT should have been a goal of a better-conceived Economic Recovery Plan by dems and Obama.
In great agreement with most of this , except for this one point:
It is not to be the burden of govt to spend vast sums to "fix" this situation. What "society" , and hence "government", should do is provide the parameters / guidelines/ laws that will force the public into wise land-use.
ellie

Raleigh, NC

#8 Feb 19, 2009
One of the things implied in the article is that Americans will finally have to quit using cities, which should be the jewels of our culture, as dumps for social problems. No other first-world nation allows its cities to be reserved exclusively for the use of idlers, criminals, junkies, whores, drug peddlers, gangs, and their victims, the elderly, ignorant, mentally ill and disabled. Help the latter, get rid of the former. Then, decent people who work, pay taxes and raise families may be able to consider moving back to the cities and the need for sprawl will disappear. We have millions of acres of vacant land and empty housing going begging, but no one will touch it because it's in cities. Cap the sprawl, but start with cleaning up the cities. And yes, lots of people will be offended because their gang territory will be broken up, or they might have to work instead of sitting on their butts collecting welfare and section 8. Wah. get a job or go to jail.
werther

Raleigh, NC

#9 Feb 20, 2009
MikeLovell wrote:
Liberals, who come up with these idiot ideas, can do something useful by being ground up and used to make my half acre suburban lawn a little greener.
oh, yes, all those liberals like Rusty Pulliam, CIBO lawyer Al Sneed, et al?
werther

Raleigh, NC

#10 Feb 20, 2009
paul varner wrote:
<quoted text>
In great agreement with most of this , except for this one point:
It is not to be the burden of govt to spend vast sums to "fix" this situation. What "society" , and hence "government", should do is provide the parameters / guidelines/ laws that will force the public into wise land-use.
You're splitting hairs. "Force the public" = government intervention, unless you've been asleep for the last 70 years. Corporations like their names on football statiums, not landfills, prisons, or low income housing

Since: Feb 07

Ashevegas

#11 Feb 20, 2009
urban America is a hellhole that no decent person should be forced to live in. Life crammed together like rats is the reason for many behavioral problems and since the pursuit of happiness is a fundamental right of Americans, there remains some hope no matter how many misguided think their was is the only way.
Sure

Lincolnton, NC

#12 Feb 25, 2009
as soon as all the freaks are kicked out and I can shoot anyone who ventures on my property. Asheville is not the same town of even 10-15 years ago. Anyway, I had to move out when taxes started to match my car payment.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Housing Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Oklahoma City proposal would require licenses f... Mon grouphomes 1
News Barbeques Galore files for bankruptcy (Aug '08) Feb 9 Still an Unpaid v... 15
News The Georgetown spring housing market is hot (Jun '14) Jan 21 Realtors Suck 13
News PulteGroup beats Street 1Q forecasts on sales b... (Apr '16) Jan 20 Ttrumped Univ 2
News GTA home prices cap tumultuous year with meagre... Jan '18 Sinkhole 1
News Five tips to help a new real estate agent provi... Dec '17 Bobby Terry Jr 1
News Few economists defend disappearing mortgage tax... Dec '17 Thanks Trump 4
More from around the web