San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Declares Second Unusual Event Due to Mexico Border Earthquakes

There are 3 comments on the Aug 26, 2012, Business Wire story titled San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Declares Second Unusual Event Due to Mexico Border Earthquakes. In it, Business Wire reports that:

There was no threat to the public or employees and no one was hurt. The plant has been off-line since earlier this year, and there is no safety risk for the public or SONGS employees.

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CaptD

San Diego, CA

#1 Aug 27, 2012
So what were the two Unusual events about?

Why is their never any real data released by the Nuclear Industry?

TEPCO does the same thing...
BDV

Atlanta, GA

#2 Aug 27, 2012
With the crude at 125 US$ and the recent hecatomb in Venezuela, that's all petroleum propaganda can come up with agitation about an old nuclear powerplant in ecofascist California?
Dan

Upton, NY

#3 Aug 28, 2012
CaptD wrote:
So what were the two Unusual events about?
Why is their never any real data released by the Nuclear Industry?
TEPCO does the same thing...
The two events were the two different earthquakes! If they are felt at the plant they are required by regulation to report them as an unusual event if no further damage is done to the plant. Here is the NRC's Emergency classification system

An Emergency Classification is a set of plant conditions which indicate a level of risk to the public. Both nuclear power plants and research and test reactors use the four emergency classifications listed below in order of increasing severity. The vast majority of events reported to the NRC are routine in nature and do not require activation of our incident response program.

•Notification of Unusual Event - Under this category, events are in process or have occurred which indicate potential degradation in the level of safety of the plant. No release of radioactive material requiring offsite response or monitoring is expected unless further degradation occurs.
•Alert - If an alert is declared, events are in process or have occurred which involve an actual or potential substantial degradation in the level of safety of the plant. Any releases of radioactive material from the plant are expected to be limited to a small fraction of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) protective action guides (PAGs).
•Site Area Emergency - A site area emergency involves events in process or which have occurred that result in actual or likely major failures of plant functions needed for protection of the public. Any releases of radioactive material are not expected to exceed the EPA PAGs except near the site boundary.
•General Emergency - A general emergency involves actual or imminent substantial core damage or melting of reactor fuel with the potential for loss of containment integrity. Radioactive releases during a general emergency can reasonably be expected to exceed the EPA PAGs for more than the immediate site area.

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